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Mission: Hayabusa 2
hendric
post Today, 02:59 PM
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Any speculation yet on the bright spot on the top? (north?) Exposed water ice seems unlikely at this distance from the sun! Maybe carbonates?


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Space Enthusiast Richard Hendricks
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"The engineers, as usual, made a tremendous fuss. Again as usual, they did the job in half the time they had dismissed as being absolutely impossible." --Rescue Party, Arthur C Clarke
Mother Nature is the final inspector of all quality.
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mcmcmc
post Today, 03:07 PM
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QUOTE (hendric @ Jun 25 2018, 02:59 PM) *
Exposed water ice seems unlikely at this distance from the sun! Maybe carbonates?

I dont't get the connection.
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john_s
post Today, 03:50 PM
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Remember this object has very low albedo, so a "bright" spot could still be quite dark in absolute terms. For instance a chunk of lunar mare basalt would probably look bright if transported to Ryugu. To me it looks like a large boulder sitting at the pole- whether the higher albedo is due to exotic composition or just the exposure of a fresh, unweathered, rockface remains to be seen.

John
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dudley
post Today, 03:51 PM
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I was thinking of salt deposits, like those found in Occator crater on Ceres. I doubt, though, that such a small body as Ryugu would be geologically differentiated, so as to permit this.
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Paolo
post Today, 05:03 PM
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I am neither a chemist nor a geologist, but I think carbonates would require liquid water to form.
on the subject of the number of craters, on the latest image I can count only one bona fide crater, plus 3 or 4 suspect circular features, possibly subdued craters.
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