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29-30 August 2007 Icy Satellites (rev 49), Last stop on the road to Iapetus
Exploitcorporati...
post Aug 9 2007, 10:40 PM
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CICLOPS' Rev 49 Looking Ahead page is up. Highlights include a fourth monthy Voyager-class encounter with Tethys with 500m resolution over Odysseus (finally!)
Detailed mosaics of Rhea's prominent ray crater and points west are on tap for Old Scabby's second closeup. This should be a really cool periapsis passage to tide us over until the 10th of September.


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ugordan
post Aug 9 2007, 10:47 PM
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Darn it, I'm kind of disappointed. I was expecting to see another one of your neat icy moon collages here. biggrin.gif

Onward to Iapetus!

(... oh well, Rhea, too *yawn* ... )


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volcanopele
post Aug 9 2007, 11:03 PM
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I should that our Rev49 preview does not include the Iapetus encounter. Basically, it was decided to split up Rev49 since too many cool things were going on for them all to be done justice. So this preview covers the encounters around periapse up through Sept. 5 or so. We will publish an extra special Looking Ahead article just for the Iapetus flyby.

ugordan, LOL, so I guess if Rhea put on some dark makeup on her leading hemisphere and wore some equatorial jewelry, it would be "Onward to Rhea!" hmph, I guess Rhea will just never be as cool as her oblate twin sister, Iapetus.


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Exploitcorporati...
post Aug 9 2007, 11:40 PM
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Ooooh...double burn!!! laugh.gif

I've been taking belly dancing classes..."Equatorial Jewelry" has multiple possible connotations and would be an excellent name for a band as well.

Really looking foreward to seeing that whole crater and how old it actually is. Judging from the single WAC frame from 2005 of that area, Rhea is a lot more interesting on small scales than she looks from afar.

Gordan, a Hyperion multi-angle composite should be up tomorrow. smile.gif


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belleraphon1
post Aug 10 2007, 12:38 AM
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Gosh.... I second the darn it!!!!!!!

As soon as I see Exploitcorporations, I jump!!!!!! biggrin.gif

I had an old friend who was a belly dancer... she would have appreciated Equatorial Jewelry... and Iapetus. smile.gif

Truly look forward to Hyperion as done up by Exploitcorporations.

Craig
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Del Palmer
post Aug 10 2007, 03:16 AM
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Latest Looking Ahead update is now available:

http://ciclops.org/view.php?id=3392

Features:

* Solar conjunction
* Stereo coverage of Tethys' Odysseus basin
* Targeted Rhea flyby focusing on its fresh impact crater
* T35 (3,302 km)
* Start of Iapetus encounter


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ugordan
post Aug 10 2007, 10:52 AM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Aug 10 2007, 12:03 AM) *
ugordan, LOL, so I guess if Rhea put on some dark makeup on her leading hemisphere and wore some equatorial jewelry, it would be "Onward to Rhea!" hmph, I guess Rhea will just never be as cool as her oblate twin sister, Iapetus.
As a matter of fact, yes.

We know they're both geologically as dead as the Monty Python parrot is, but at least Iapetus wears "makeup" and sports a strange figure. Rhea is just plain... dull. Oh, that and we already got a sh*tload of close Rhea images. Last time we flew close to Iapetus, we found unexpected stuff. What interesting bit have we found at Rhea yet?

Nothing to see here people, move along...


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OWW
post Aug 10 2007, 01:09 PM
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I think this dutch proverb is very appropriate:

"Even if a monkey wears a golden ring, it is and remains an ugly thing"
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Rob Pinnegar
post Aug 10 2007, 01:40 PM
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I don't often actually laugh out loud at things I see on the Internet, but EC's characterization of Rhea as "Old Scabby" at the top of this thread did the job.

As for Rhea vs. Iapetus -- There's no doubt that currently-active bodies will always be most interesting, but, failing that, ancient activity trumps no activity at all. (Unless the absence of activity is interesting in itself, of course -- but while that might be the case for Mimas, it ain't so for Rhea.)
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edstrick
post Aug 11 2007, 06:30 AM
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Hey.. let's not give poor Rhea a hard time. She can't help looking like the ultimate battered wife.

Actually, Rhea IS interesting, but in horrendously subtle ways. Even the Voyager 1 close pass mosaics showed subtle lineaments of crater edges and features that simply aren't due to lighting effects <lighting CAN cause spureous lineations to appear> Something's "interesting" about the way Rhea responds to battering. Something makes the whispy features visible on the trailing side, only partially revealed to be due to subtle dione/tethys like fracturing.

It's a shame Rhea, the largest of Saturn's iceballs, isn't something semi-spectacular like Aerial at Uranus, but that's the breaks!
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volcanopele
post Aug 31 2007, 05:22 PM
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Some raws from the Rhea encounter are now up (hopefully some of the Tethys stuff a little later biggrin.gif )
http://ciclops.org/view_event.php?id=66

http://ciclops.org/view.php?id=3705 shows the interior of the "young" ray crater. Not quite that young it would seem. [EDIT: not that isn't... but http://ciclops.org/view.php?id=3713 is]


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nprev
post Aug 31 2007, 05:44 PM
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Huh. This image seems to show a lobate flow with striations near the top center...interesting! (Can't believe that I just used the word "interesting" with respect to Rhea, but that's what exploration is all about... smile.gif )

EDIT: Whoa! Look at this bright albedo feature with the dark spot! It actually looks young! Might have to drop the I-word & go with the F-word (fascinating!)


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volcanopele
post Aug 31 2007, 06:03 PM
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I'm confused, I don't see it.


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Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Aug 31 2007, 06:23 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Aug 31 2007, 08:03 AM) *
I'm confused, I don't see it.

Neither do I.
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ugordan
post Aug 31 2007, 06:24 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Aug 31 2007, 06:22 PM) *
Not quite that young it would seem.
To the untrained (and low-phase-confused) eye, that would appear to be pretty young terrain. It looks almost as young as some of Enceladus' surface.

I think nprev's talking about the small double crater at top center, in the brightest portion of the image. It's got a darker floor which I'd personally attribute to shading instead of albedo difference.


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