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InSight Surface Operations, 26 Nov 2018-
climber
post Aug 8 2019, 09:05 PM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Aug 7 2019, 06:53 AM) *
.... but since I'm an engineer I have to point out that an MSL drill hole is about 17mm in diameter and 4 cm deep, and the HP3 mole is 27mm in diameter....

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PaulH51
post Aug 11 2019, 01:36 AM
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Push number three? Sol 250 (Aug 10)
Looks like at lease 2 pushes in different locations during this sol. We can see some crumbling of the pit wall, but due to the late afternoon shadows we can't yet see inside the pit. But progress is progress smile.gif
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JRehling
post Aug 11 2019, 04:23 AM
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We can see a bit into the hole. Brightness jacked up, square-root style. There is some soil collapsed around the mole. However, I can't tell if this is progress from the previous status.
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 11 2019, 06:29 PM
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Doing something similar with the sol 243 image, I think there is certainly some extra material in the hole on sol 250.

Phil

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atomoid
post Aug 13 2019, 02:33 AM
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looks a bit better on sol251
https://mars.nasa.gov/insight-raw-images/su...0000_0250M_.JPG
based on the integrity of the hole, it makes sense such a simple pressing action would not fill the hole very much further than it has already collapsed, and even so the resultant infill would be too loose and leave a derth of soil around the probe that would tend to complicate attempts at further compaction, so it would seem the approach requires additional soil followed by compressive pressing.. im sure they've already tried different approaches based on all foreseen contingencies, well see what comes up next.
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 14 2019, 04:55 PM
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There were two separate scoop contacts on sol 250, and now two more on sol 253. It looks like the strategy is to press in different locations to encourage material to slump into the hole, though it's not always apparent that anything happened. The first contact on sol 250 did result in a slump of material into the hole. Whether this is enough, or whether more material will have to be pulled in, is something we will have to wait to see.

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Aug 14 2019, 06:19 PM
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Here is the hole after sol 253, brightened to show debris in the hole. A bit more than on sol 250, but not much more.

Phil

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atomoid
post Aug 15 2019, 06:26 PM
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little scoop stomp loop (7 frame gif @4fps) sol253
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 22 2019, 10:10 PM
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Looks like we will be waiting until after conjunction for any more progress on the mole. My impression so far is that the strategy of making the wall of the pit collapse is not going to be enough, so maybe we will see the scoop pulling soil towards the hole.

Phil


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PaulH51
post Aug 22 2019, 11:21 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Aug 23 2019, 06:10 AM) *
Looks like we will be waiting until after conjunction for any more progress on the mole. My impression so far is that the strategy of making the wall of the pit collapse is not going to be enough, so maybe we will see the scoop pulling soil towards the hole....

Sounds like a good call Phil: Blog update from Leonard Davis: http://www.leonarddavid.com/mars-insight-mole-madness/
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stevesliva
post Aug 29 2019, 03:22 PM
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Mole update from DLR
https://www.dlr.de/blogs/en/all-blog-posts/...aspx/ressort-2/

QUOTE
I am thinking towards pinning the mole with the scoop such that the pinning and the pressing of the mole against the wall of the pit would increase friction. This will be more risky than the previous strategy, but with the unexpectedly stiff duricrust, it may be worth a try.
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atomoid
post Aug 29 2019, 06:47 PM
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Thanks for sharing that link, its incredible to consider the duricrust is being so resistant that even pressing with the blade tip didn't collapse the pit appreciably, which backs up the inference that the tiltmeter recordings support the scenario of "...the mole first lifted the SSA while at the same time penetrating slowly about 7 cm until it had hammered through the duricrust and the SSA resettled on the ground.", suggesting that pinning the mole against the wall of the pit may indeed be perhaps the best remaining option.
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fredk
post Aug 29 2019, 08:46 PM
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I guess one worry with pinning the mole with the scoop is what happens after the mole digs in completely below the surface. Then the scoop will no longer be able to provide pressure so there's a risk that the mole will stall again in loose soil or a new cavity. What about scooping/scraping soil into the hole in addition to pinning with the scoop? Is there much risk with scooping/scraping?
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 29 2019, 10:37 PM
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The risk might be that the surface is unpredictable if it's cemented, rather than loose sand or dust. The scoop might stall and then jump, or a plate of duricrust might break and shift, at an unpredictable location.

Phil


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moustifouette
post Aug 30 2019, 10:00 PM
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What about digging a hole farther away, in order to better understand soil properties and to get some material to file to mole hole ?
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