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The Top of Vera Rubin Ridge Part 1, Site 66-67, sol 1812-1943, 11 Sep 2017-23 Jan 2018
charborob
post Nov 7 2017, 02:12 PM
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Sol 1866 Lmastcam:
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Art Martin
post Nov 7 2017, 06:31 PM
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What an amazing view of the path ahead. Does anyone know the height of some of those large mesas at the base of Mt. Sharp? So hard to get a feel of scale in these photos. I remember early in the mission the first high res shots of that area there was a boulder down at the base of one of them and it was supposedly taller than the rover and it looked tiny in comparison to the hill beside it.
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RoverDriver
post Nov 7 2017, 06:55 PM
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QUOTE (Art Martin @ Nov 7 2017, 10:31 AM) *
What an amazing view of the path ahead. Does anyone know the height of some of those large mesas at the base of Mt. Sharp? So hard to get a feel of scale in these photos. I remember early in the mission the first high res shots of that area there was a boulder down at the base of one of them and it was supposedly taller than the rover and it looked tiny in comparison to the hill beside it.


This should give you a rough idea:
https://hirise-pds.lpl.arizona.edu/PDS/EXTR...1750_U01.ca.jpg

Paolo


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Sean
post Nov 7 2017, 07:39 PM
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If you have a Daydream or GearVR phone [ or phone supporting VR ] or HMD you can visit this area in person. The mesas are frickin' huge.

Sketchfab


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jvandriel
post Nov 10 2017, 09:31 AM
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The Navcam L view on Sol 1869.

Jan van Driel

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Floyd
post Nov 10 2017, 04:28 PM
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The rim is so clear now--dust must be very low!


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Phil Stooke
post Nov 10 2017, 06:13 PM
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Yes, it's great to see the rim again so clearly.

Here is Jan's panorama from sol 1869 in circular form. We are in a recess in this small topographic step on the ridge, probably ready to climb it now. Let's hope that drill can be used on the ridge before we have to move on.

Phil

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Floyd
post Nov 10 2017, 10:56 PM
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Any chance this is a walk around to understand the overall diversity of rock types, and when done, possibly go back down the hill to an older layer to start drill sampling?


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Phil Stooke
post Nov 10 2017, 11:45 PM
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I really can't see a return to the lower surface north of the ridge. That geologic unit had been drilled further north, and examined at almost every stop by ChemCam and APXS along the way.

Phil


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Floyd
post Nov 11 2017, 12:00 AM
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I was thinking older and younger layers of Vera Rubin Ridge, not all the way back down.


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PaulH51
post Nov 11 2017, 06:32 AM
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Question for the group: I used to get the approximate elevation of Curiosity from the JPL traverse maps posted here, but JPL have not updated the maps since sol 1830. I'm guessing I could obtain elevation from NAIF or maybe from the JSON files. Not sure how easy that would be, but likely beyond my skill-set. So I'm hoping there could be another source for that data without having to await the PDS....

In the meantime here's a (very rough & ready) Curiosity Sol 1871 L-NavCam partial pan assembled in MS ICE, the stitch is poor, but the scenery is lovely.
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jvandriel
post Nov 11 2017, 07:33 PM
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The Navcam L view on Sol 1871.

Jan van Driel

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HSchirmer
post Nov 11 2017, 07:39 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Nov 11 2017, 12:45 AM) *
I really can't see a return to the lower surface north of the ridge.
That geologic unit had been drilled further north, and examined at almost every stop by ChemCam and APXS along the way.

Phil


But, if you don't drill actual bedrock, how would you know it's the same geologic unit?





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neo56
post Nov 11 2017, 08:38 PM
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I made an animation with the 25 MAHLI dust level checks of REMS UV sensors that Paul selected.
The distribution of dust changes between sols 1498 and 1552: while dust was evenly distributed on the ring-shaped magnets before sol 1498, it then forms accumulations, as if the fine fraction of dust had been blown away by a wind event. We also observe this dust accumulation on the left side of the REMS device.

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Higher resolution version of the animation here.


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Phil Stooke
post Nov 11 2017, 09:25 PM
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"But, if you don't drill actual bedrock, how would you know it's the same geologic unit?"


All the ChemCam and APXS data, plus geological interpretation of HiRISE and rover images. The rover updates at JPL have made clear the interpretation being followed by the rover team. This ridge is a new unit. To go back to the earlier question, which I misinterpreted, certainly there might be a return to lower units on the top of the ridge if variations in ChemCam and APXS (plus Mastcam multispectral) suggest it's useful, otherwise one drill site may be enough.

Anyhoo, here is Jan's 1871 panorama in circular form.

Phil



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