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ExoMars
elakdawalla
post Jun 8 2015, 04:34 PM
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Just some forum management info: I have established a subforum for the ExoMars program, and split out a topic for ExoMars TGO launch preparations, now that the spacecraft is being assembled. It may be appropriate at some point in the near future to establish separate threads for the EDM and the ExoMars 2018 (or maybe now 2020) rover, but we can wait for some news.


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JRehling
post Mar 14 2016, 09:58 PM
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Now that the ExoMars Orbiter has successfully launched, we will soon have three different orbiters that are intended to map the distribution of Mars' atmospheric composition. I'm unsure of their relative strengths, but it's logical to think about their data will complement one another's.

An easy comparison is between their orbits…

MAVEN: 150x6,200 km (4.5 hours)
Mangalyaan: 420x77,000 km (73 hours)
ExoMars TGO: 400x400 km (120 min)

MAVEN is not expected to map the lower atmosphere's methane, but the other two are intended to do so. Obviously, ExoMars has a much shorter period, and should be better at determining temporal variations, which we know exist thanks to measurements from the surface made by Curiosity. Mangalyaan will perform full-disk methane scans at apoaeion, while ExoMars will be making more localized measurements. I'm not sure how their spectral resolution will compare.

The different missions could complement one another both in the search for methane and more generally. I don't know when the results will begin to be available, but 2017 might provide our first specific knowledge of the spatial and temporal variation of methane on Mars, and give us some landing sites for a follow-the-methane strategy.
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katodomo
post Mar 15 2016, 09:54 AM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Mar 14 2016, 10:58 PM) *
ExoMars TGO: 400x400 km (120 min)

TGO will initially enter a 300x96,000 km high elliptic orbit much like Mangalyaan and then slowly aerobrake over the next 12 months into the 400 km circular orbit. Full science phase only begins after circularization.
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marsophile
post Mar 21 2016, 06:11 AM
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I understand the Shiaparelli lander is due to set down in south Meridiani. Is there any possibility that the Opportunity rover might be able to observe part of the descent.
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Explorer1
post Mar 21 2016, 06:22 AM
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It would be really tricky; the timing would have to be perfect, and at any rate, I doubt the camera's are good enough to resolve something that small. I don't doubt that HiRISE on MRO can manage it (see my avatar for proof)!
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jamescanvin
post Mar 21 2016, 08:38 AM
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One problem is Shiaparelli is landing to the west, so if Oppy is still in Endeavour crater come October I don't think she'll have a line of sight.

If we are back out by then then I would imagine that a few Navcams would be taken in that direction at the right time just to try. It might be possible to see the entry phase, not sure how bright that would be.


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James Sorenson
post Mar 21 2016, 02:54 PM
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I think the better chance of catching something would be with with the front Hazcams since they are much wider FOV. They won't be able to resolve the lander because the lower resolution, but maybe flashing/atmospheric glow and streaking during peak heating if the rover was pointed in the general direction? Maybe find a small mound to pitch the rover slightly up for a better view of the sky? It would have to be incredibly lucky to catch anything in Navcam let alone Pancam.
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jamescanvin
post Mar 22 2016, 09:04 AM
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The direction for the entry phase will be well known, shouldn't be any problem getting it within a Navcam frame. Whether anything will be visible is another matter.

Probably 50/50 that you could get the decent within a Navcam frame (based on the landing ellipse) but as the parachute will be less than 1/2 a pixel across* I don't think that will be doable anyway.

*Unless it's at the far end of the ellipse and heading for Eagle crater smile.gif


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JRehling
post Mar 22 2016, 03:58 PM
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If the entry takes place in a dark sky, it would easily be visible, given a line of sight. Resolution isn't an issue. If it's in a daytime sky, then transparency would be a key variable.

I easily saw the Stardust capsule (re)enter Earth's atmosphere with the naked eye from many hundreds of miles away, directly over the lights of a city. But it was at night.
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akuo
post Mar 22 2016, 05:48 PM
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There is a report now that the Briz-M stage disintegrated after Exomars's separation from it:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/rock...aunch-disaster/


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Deimos
post Mar 23 2016, 02:49 AM
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Entry is early afternoon in Meridiani. Seasonally, dust optical depth may be 0.9-1.2 in the absence of a global dust event.
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PaulH51
post May 2 2016, 11:35 AM
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Not sure if this is the correct thread?

ESA Press release N° 11–2016:

SECOND EXOMARS MISSION MOVES TO NEXT LAUNCH OPPORTUNITY IN 2020
Dated 2 May 2016 : LINK
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Explorer1
post May 2 2016, 03:52 PM
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More and more like MSL; 2020 will be a crowded year for landings apparently!
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nogal
post Aug 12 2016, 05:23 PM
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As Emily suggested, perhaps this post should be moved to a new subtopic.

EDIT: I have moved the contents to here.

Fernando
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Sean
post Feb 18 2017, 02:48 AM
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@HiRISE flyby of Aram Dorsum

Click thru to see the video...



And the scene in Gigapan








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