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Rosetta PDS, Images and other products made from archived data
JohnVV
post Oct 2 2016, 12:49 AM
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the img files are not 32 bit float

they are 16 bit LSB unsigned as per the label on the img file
QUOTE
SAMPLE_TYPE = LSB_UNSIGNED_INTEGER
SAMPLE_BITS = 16

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chuck0
post Oct 2 2016, 09:48 AM
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That label is for a NAVCAM image file, not an OSIRIS one. The OSIRIS ones are 32bit float

http://imagearchives.esac.esa.int/picture....26/category/252


QUOTE
Object = IMAGE
INTERCHANGE_FORMAT = BINARY
LINES = 2048
LINE_SAMPLES = 2048
FIRST_LINE = 1
FIRST_LINE_SAMPLE = 1
SAMPLE_TYPE = PC_REAL
SAMPLE_BITS = 32
BANDS = 1
UNIT = W/M**2/SR/NM
SAMPLE_DISPLAY_DIRECTION = RIGHT
LINE_DISPLAY_DIRECTION = DOWN
End_Object



Played a bit more with some of the OSIRIS images...

havent seen that one on here yet:



it is the WAC version of the spacecrafts shadow on the comet image. Also, there is one patch of stuff that looks like ice above and slightly to the left of Rosettas shadow smile.gif .

The next one is an overexposed view of comet activity... love those images because they show off pretty nicely what makes comets such special small bodies smile.gif



If you zoom in you can also see a huge number of small/faint streaks which i would assume are a bit larger/closer particles leaving the comet?
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chuck0
post Oct 2 2016, 07:57 PM
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Also, since i love color pictures and the global comet images show so few color variations i took a look at the zero phase angle flyby. There is quite a bit of variation across the three bands that are available (Red, Orange, Blue)... registering them is pretty straight forward since it is primarily only a rotation/translation.







It is really a pity that there is only one proper WAC OSIRIS image of that flyby.
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jccwrt
post Feb 7 2017, 01:55 AM
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Most recent release of OSIRIS data is finally working, so I put together a color image taken on March 3. This should be in approximately true color (using images from VIS_BLUE, VIS_GREEN, and VIS_RED), with the caveat that the saturation has been increased a little to make the subtle color variation a little more obvious.

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jccwrt
post Feb 8 2017, 03:06 PM
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A couple of tries at doing some HDR work with the OSIRIS wide-angle far excursion coma studies.



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machi
post Oct 23 2018, 10:16 PM
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I wrote new article for my blog after more than 4 year hiatus (hibernation?).
It's a first part of few (5+) articles covering mostly color imaging of 67P comet from the Rosetta spacecraft.
First part is mainly about history of cometary nuclei imaging to put Rosetta mission in to the context and it contains only 2 images of 67P on the end of article,
but on other side it also contains 6 new reprocessed images of cometary nuclei from different mission (VeGa-2, Deep Space 1 , Deep Impact, Stardust and others).
Article is in the Czech language but it should readable via Google translator (translator button is on the page) and basic info about images is already in the English language.
Here are two new images of comet 67P via Flickr taken in the beginning of the mission (5. August 2014).
First is close to real colors and it uses three images taken through orange, green and blue filter (details in the link).



Second image has spectrally extended and enhanced colors and it's from the same sequence but now near-IR image is used as red image and orange image is used as green image in the RGB composite.



I have also already some 50% of images for the second part of article series which should be about global mapping of 67P comet.
Images are available on my Flickr account and here are few examples in spectrally extended and enhanced colors later in the mission when comet was more active.
All of them are made using near-IR, orange and blue images as RGB composite.

24. June 2015.



12. April 2015.



22. November 2015




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Explorer1
post Oct 24 2018, 01:45 AM
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Gorgeous work Machi! The clear outline of the night portion is always a neat sight, thanks to the coma making the background less than the usual black for completely airless bodies.

Your blog post also reminded me, if only Giotto's camera hadn't broken, I wonder what Halley would have looked like up close? What sort of resolution would have been possible? If we want a Rosetta style rendezvous mission in 2061, it's best to start planning now!
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Adam Hurcewicz
post Oct 24 2018, 07:25 AM
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Wow. It's great work machi. I will wait for other articles smile.gif


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Adam Hurcewicz from Poland
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machi
post Oct 24 2018, 12:09 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Oct 24 2018, 03:45 AM) *
Gorgeous work Machi! The clear outline of the night portion is always a neat sight, thanks to the coma making the background less than the usual black for completely airless bodies.

QUOTE (Adam Hurcewicz @ Oct 24 2018, 09:25 AM) *
Wow. It's great work machi. I will wait for other articles smile.gif

Thanks!

QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Oct 24 2018, 03:45 AM) *
Your blog post also reminded me, if only Giotto's camera hadn't broken, I wonder what Halley would have looked like up close? What sort of resolution would have been possible? If we want a Rosetta style rendezvous mission in 2061, it's best to start planning now!

On paper, hi-res images should have up to 13 m/pix resolution but I think that images from the closest distance would be significantly affected by the dust. This effect is already visible in the highest resolution images which were send to Earth. They have very low contrast.
I think that more interesting would be images covering opposite hemisphere of the comet as that hemisphere was better illuminated by the Sun.
But Giotto was simply very risky and bold mission barely comparable to anything else.
With flyby speeds near 70 km/s in distance 600 km from the most active comet ever visited by humanity, no other mission comes close to that.
In the end it did pretty good job!


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