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LADEE
kenny
post Feb 1 2014, 11:08 AM
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LRO photographed LADEE passing underneath it. They also managed to reconstruct a better image from the blur, showing features on the spacecraft. Very nice...

Ladee from LRO
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Explorer1
post Apr 2 2014, 03:39 AM
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Teleconference this Thursday about the extended science and EOM.

http://www.nasa.gov/ames/nasa-to-host-medi...ed-moon-impact/
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 15 2014, 11:28 PM
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LADEE tweeted that it survived the eclipse.

Phil


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djellison
post Apr 15 2014, 11:38 PM
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There's a great display that will autonomously flick between realtime telemetry driven and predicted trajectory

http://ladeestk.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/preview.cgi

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dilo
post Apr 16 2014, 01:31 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Apr 15 2014, 11:38 PM) *
There's a great display that will autonomously flick between realtime telemetry driven and predicted trajectory

Cool indeed! Until this morning (08 UT) periaxis was a mere 5.19 km above nominal surface:
Attached Image

Now connection appear impossible for me (timeout expiring), do someone knows more recen informations?

NOTE: I was able to re-connect few minutes ago, exactly near the new periaxis! at 15:35 it was 5.29km (slightly increased)


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gwiz
post Apr 18 2014, 09:54 AM
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It's down, no details from NASA yet but someone's tweeted Sundman crater.
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 18 2014, 01:01 PM
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Yes, Thursday evening California time, Friday morning UT. Sundman crater is just north of Orientale, near Einstein crater and only just on the far side. Details were from Astrogator.

Phil



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Phil Stooke
post Sep 18 2014, 07:20 PM
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I added LADEE (extreme right edge) and Chang'E 3 to my fake olde-time lunar map with landing and impact sites:

http://publish.uwo.ca/~pjstooke/vehiculum.jpg

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Oct 28 2014, 08:20 PM
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LADEE imaged by LROC.

http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/822

Here's a finder image to locate the site.

Phil

Attached Image


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Explorer1
post Jun 18 2015, 06:24 PM
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Looks like an old mystery may have been solved: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v522/...ature14479.html
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dinos
post Jul 7 2015, 09:46 AM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jun 18 2015, 07:24 PM) *
Looks like an old mystery may have been solved: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v522/...ature14479.html

interesting but i don't think so... is there any additional source?


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 7 2015, 12:01 PM
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It's Nature... it is an additional source all by itself.

Perhaps you would care to explain the reason for your scepticism. It all seems pretty reasonable to me.

Phil



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Paolo
post Jan 15 2016, 08:20 AM
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one new paper on LADEE results in today's Science (and it appears to be in open access!):

How surface composition and meteoroid impacts mediate sodium and potassium in the lunar exosphere

QUOTE
Despite being trace constituents of the lunar exosphere, sodium and potassium are the most readily observed species due to their bright line emission. Measurements of these species by the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVS) on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) have revealed unambiguous temporal and spatial variations indicative of a strong role for meteoroid bombardment and surface composition in determining the composition and local time dependence of the Moon’s exosphere. Observations show distinct lunar day (monthly) cycles for both species as well as an annual cycle for sodium. The first continuous measurements for potassium show a more repeatable variation across lunations and an enhancement over KREEP (Potassium Rare Earth Elements and Phosphorus) surface regions, revealing a strong dependence on surface composition.


see also the perspective article (also in open access):

Sampling the Moon's atmosphere

QUOTE
In H. G. Wells' 1901 science fiction classic The First Men in the Moon, two protagonists, English businessman Mr. Bedford and the eccentric physicist Dr. Cavor, knock back a special enervating concoction designed to expand their lungs, followed by the requisite fortifying brandy, before venturing onto the Moon's surface to breathe the rarefied lunar atmosphere. Even more tenuous than Wells' imagined environment, the lunar exosphere is an atmosphere so thin that atoms never collide, bounded on one side by the lunar surface and extending thousands of kilometers out into space. This low-density envelope results from a balance among the influx of material from the Sun, outgassing from the Moon's interior, delivery from meteoritic bombardment, and the loss of material to space as well as recycling in the lunar surface (see the figure). The precise formula for the formation of the lunar exosphere is unknown, but recent data from orbital spacecraft are being used to delineate the relative contributions from different processes. On page 249 of this issue, Colaprete et al. (1) report measurements of sodium and potassium (Na and K) in the lunar exosphere based on observations from the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVS) aboard NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), which acquired continuous dayside and nightside measurements of exospheric Na and K over multiple lunar orbits.
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Phil Stooke
post Aug 29 2016, 02:36 PM
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Looking back at this thread, I didn't see any mention of the LADEE star tracker images. I have found three short GIF sequences shot by the star trackers:

http://www.nasa.gov/ames/ladee-star-tracke...canelli-craters

https://www.nasa.gov/ames/ladee-project-scientist-update/

http://www.americaspace.com/?p=59288

If anybody knows of others, please post them!

The first two show the surface illuminated by Earthshine. One has locations identified, the other doesn't. I have located them on these maps.

Phil

Attached Image


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