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Parker Solar Probe, Take the Solar Plunge
JRehling
post Mar 3 2021, 12:38 AM
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Protons from the Sun are a type of cosmic ray and PSP is uniquely close to the Sun.

The trails can curve as they lose energy inside a solid medium.

Of course, one variable that drives up the number of artifacts is the exposure duration, and seeing the night side of Venus involves a relatively high exposure duration, but that depends on a lot of variables.

Deep Sky Object imagery is pretty prone to pick up on both cosmic ray hits and (from Earth, more likely) satellite / space junk / asteroid trails, and in images where you don't see those, there's a good chance that someone made an effort to remove them. I tend to shoot multi exposure images and when one out of many frames has such a flaw, I just don't use that frame for that part of the composite. for example.
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rlorenz
post Mar 4 2021, 04:08 AM
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QUOTE (JTN @ Mar 2 2021, 07:04 PM) *
In some frames, particularly the fourth frame in Ian R's latest (reproduced here), the tracks are curved, which makes me think they can't be cosmic rays


It is debris in the near field, being accelerated by electrostatic forces
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El Mitico
post Mar 29 2021, 05:14 PM
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Hi. Longtime lurker here....working in the field of cosmic rays

It seems to me that the image shows a combination of stellar objects on the background, producing the left to right streaks due to the long exposure, with stratight traces from cosmic rays on the ccd, plus particles moving in the near field during said exposure time. Why do they move like that? local electromagnetic fields from the spacecraft? radiation pressure?...no idea!. But electrostatic forces alone would produce more straight lines wouldnt they?
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