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Beyond Lewis and Clark Gap, Sol 4482- (September 2, 2016-)
James Sorenson
post Apr 30 2017, 05:29 AM
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Yes, Perseverance Valley is tbe gully like feature that Oppy is going to. Very close now.
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jvandriel
post Apr 30 2017, 12:03 PM
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The Navcam L0 view on Sol 4711-4712.

Jan van Driel

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Phil Stooke
post Apr 30 2017, 08:21 PM
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Here is Jan's new panorama in circular form. We are right beside the little crater Orion. The even smaller crater (pit) Mariner 4 is just to the SW of the rover.

Phil

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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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jvandriel
post May 2 2017, 02:19 PM
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The Navcam L0 view on Sol 4716-4717.

Jan van Driel

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Phil Stooke
post May 2 2017, 03:44 PM
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... and a circular version of it. Thanks! That small crater just north of us is visible in HiRISE. (EDIT - it's called Casper. Orion and Casper were the Apollo 16 LM and CSM respectively.) One more drive and we'll be on the rim. Maybe two drives to allow for some careful positioning right on the edge.

Phil

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jvandriel
post May 2 2017, 08:47 PM
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The Pancam L2 view on Sol 4716.

Jan van Driel

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atomoid
post May 2 2017, 08:51 PM
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..and the anaglyph view
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fredk
post May 4 2017, 04:16 AM
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Phobos transit visible in these 4719 pancams, even though the public jpegs are clipped:
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jvandriel
post May 5 2017, 08:22 AM
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The Navcam L0 view on Sol 4718-4719.

Jan van Driel

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jvandriel
post May 5 2017, 08:49 AM
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and the Navcam L0 view on Sol 4720.

Jan van Driel

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Steve5304
post May 5 2017, 02:01 PM
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Think we really need to visit that slab. it could be exposed Carbon ice.Gypsum..or whatever.. it seems rigid in place and not eroding on par with the crater and it seems linked on the Hirise Image to an interesting surface feature that may even be related to the gully

Its brightness is very noticeable.





What do you guys think? I can't recall seeing a feature like this on that scale
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vikingmars
post May 5 2017, 02:05 PM
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QUOTE (jvandriel @ May 5 2017, 10:49 AM) *
and the Navcam L0 view on Sol 4720. Jan van Driel

Thank you very much Jan van Driel smile.gif
Can those ripples in front of the rover be considered as "sand traps" ?
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Phil Stooke
post May 5 2017, 02:28 PM
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"I can't recall seeing a feature like this on that scale"

Look back 1000 sols to the images on this page:

http://www.midnightplanets.com/web/MERB/sol/03749.html


(Wdowiak Ridge, sol 3749)

The geologists who run the mission have not noted this as anything especially unusual. I personally think it's just the same as lots of other lumps and bumps seen along the crater rim. There are much more compelling reasons to go down into the crater again, where broad areas of outcrop downhill from the 'gully' will be explored later.


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Phil Stooke
post May 5 2017, 03:32 PM
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This is Jan's half-panorama from sol 4720 in a circular projection. It makes the slopes look much steeper than they really are. I would anticipate a drive out onto that spur just to the north of us (top of the image) to get a better look across the slope and into the valley.

Phil

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fredk
post May 5 2017, 04:10 PM
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QUOTE (Steve5304 @ May 5 2017, 03:01 PM) *
Think we really need to visit that slab. it could be exposed Carbon ice.Gypsum..or whatever...
Its brightness is very noticeable.

From the latest PS report:
QUOTE
It was intriguing enough for the scientists to consider dispatching Opportunity for a quick visit. It would be their only chance since once the rover descends into Perseverance Valley, she won’t be coming back this way again. “Our estimate was that it would take a month to go to Winnemucca, look at it, kick around, and get back,” said Golombek.

Ultimately, the decision was – no go

And ice would be much brighter than this - remember that Mars soil is usually very dark. Check out some of those old Phoenix ice pics.
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