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Galileo images and mosaics of Europa
Decepticon
post Oct 8 2005, 02:25 AM
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Has anyone here cleaned up this picture? It one of my favorite images of Europa http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA02528.jpg
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t_oner
post Oct 21 2005, 08:19 PM
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Here is a rendering using my map.
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Decepticon
post Oct 21 2005, 10:00 PM
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WOW! Keeping that one!

Have anymore? Webpage?
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mike
post Oct 22 2005, 12:19 AM
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So many moons and planets, so little time.. perhaps the Planetary Society will get enough money for a close inspection of Europa sometime soon.
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Decepticon
post Oct 22 2005, 02:26 AM
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Europa has always capture my imagination.

I even dream of swimming around its oceans!

This leads me to a kinda off topic question. Has Europa ever been in a Hollywood movie besides 2010?
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t_oner
post Oct 22 2005, 05:43 AM
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Decepticon,

I don't have a website but I have contributed many maps to Calvin Hamilton's Views of the Solar System. The above Europa image is created using the map at:
http://www.solarviews.com/eng/eurmap.htm
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Decepticon
post Oct 22 2005, 10:08 AM
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Thanks!
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tedstryk
post Oct 22 2005, 12:23 PM
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Great work! I have always enjoyed your work on Views. Great to see you in this forum!


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vexgizmo
post Dec 29 2005, 05:56 AM
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Thank you all for the time and effort put into these beautiful Europa products! Ted, your E14-based Europa color mosaic is amazing. Sorry we couldn't get you that green-filter near-terminator strip returned to Earth....

-Bob P.
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ilbasso
post Dec 29 2005, 03:12 PM
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QUOTE (mike @ Oct 21 2005, 07:19 PM)
So many moons and planets, so little time..  perhaps the Planetary Society will get enough money for a close inspection of Europa sometime soon.
*


Can you imagine how many spacecraft we could build if France, the UK, Russia, and the US stopped building warplanes for just one year and diverted the money to space hardware? I know that's totally fanciful, and I know we need planes, and our military plays a vitally important role (and my son is a helicopter pilot in the US Army)...but would it really "kill" us to go one measly year without building new ones? We could fund many of the projects we would so dearly love to do. Think how much we could learn about our solar system!

Add it to your New Year's wish list!

Has anyone totalled up the surface area of the moons and major asteroids, even just a rough order of magnitude, and compared it to the Earth's surface area? Isn't it amazing to think about how much unexplored territory there is in our solar system? Once we get the technology to visit them, the human race will be busy for decades crawling over every nook and cranny.


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ilbasso
post Dec 29 2005, 05:06 PM
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Answering my own question: counting only the terrestrial and icy planets and moons, and not including any asteroids, comets or KBOs, the total surface area of the non-Earth "solid" solar system objects is roughly 281.7 million square kilometers, or about 2.2 times the total surface area of the Earth (including the oceans).

That seems low somehow.

But assuming it's correct, and assuming that an astronaut could explore 10 km^2 of surface area per day, it would take 28 million "person-days" to explore the surfaces of the moons and planets in our solar system. That sounds like steady employment well into the next century.


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vexgizmo
post Jan 21 2006, 09:44 PM
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Here's a challenge that I hope one of you might accept. During the E12 Galileo orbit, there was a sequence of Galileo color images obtained of Conamara Chaos. Below is work by the Galileo SSI team to assemble these into color mosaics. This color imaging is enough to paint much of the famous E6 Conamara Chaos mosaic in true color (or near-true color extrapolated from 2 colors)--unfortunately we still only see this region painted by false bluish color based only on the E4 Europa albedo images. Can someone accept the challenge of painting Conamara with its true E12 color?

-Bob P.
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ljk4-1
post Jan 22 2006, 12:51 AM
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QUOTE (vexgizmo @ Jan 21 2006, 04:44 PM)
Here's a challenge that I hope one of you might accept.  During the E12 Galileo orbit, there was a sequence of Galileo color images obtained of Conamara Chaos.  Below is work by the Galileo SSI team to assemble these into color mosaics.  This color imaging is enough to paint much of the famous E6 Conamara Chaos mosaic in true color (or near-true color extrapolated from 2 colors)--unfortunately we still only see this region painted by false bluish color based only on the E4 Europa albedo images.  Can someone accept the challenge of painting Conamara with its true E12 color?

-Bob P.
*


Does anyone know what the composition of those brown areas are?

And did they come from the ocean floor?


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"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

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Guest_Myran_*
post Jan 22 2006, 03:20 AM
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QUOTE
Vexgizmo said:  Can someone accept the challenge of painting Conamara with its true E12 color?


Im certain it would be possible to do that, I did some fast dabbling with the small one you provided, but as soon I zoomed in I noted the jpeg noise and well...at least I would feel it more rewarding to spend time on if one had a larger sized image than that so one wouldnt get artifacts from masking the various parts.

I include the quick dabbling I did for reference though.



Edit: Images where each colour channel would be separated would of course be the very best.
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David
post Jan 22 2006, 08:47 AM
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QUOTE (ilbasso @ Dec 29 2005, 05:06 PM)
Answering my own question:  counting only the terrestrial and icy planets and moons, and not including any asteroids, comets or KBOs, the total surface area of the non-Earth "solid" solar system objects is roughly 281.7 million square kilometers, or about 2.2 times the total surface area of the Earth (including the oceans). 

That seems low somehow.
*


Most of that must be Venus (9/10s of Earth's total area, including oceans; a vast territory to explore, if one could only get to it -- drat that Venusian atmosphere!).

Given that Mars' surface area is about the same as that of the whole land area of Earth, and the Moon's is about the size of Asia, and there are only five bodies intermediate in size between Mars and the Moon, yeah, that seems about right.
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