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Voyager mosaics and images of Jupiter, A fresh look at some ancient stuff
john_s
post Feb 1 2019, 06:25 PM
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That's an incredible image! I'm surprised I've never seen a version of it before.

Thanks,
John
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Ian R
post Feb 3 2019, 06:44 PM
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Tremendous mosaic, Justin; I know how hard it is to work with the Voyager Jupiter data sets, so this is particularly satisfying!


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 5 2019, 11:54 PM
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Today is the 40 year anniversary of the Voyager 1 Jupiter closest approach. This was the start of a complete revolution in knowledge about the outer solar system (one interesting example: Before Voyager, all of the outer planet satellites were thought to be 'dead' but today it seems more typical for each giant planet satellite system to contain at least one geologically active body).

The Voyager spacecraft are well known for their many spectacular and beautiful color images of Jupiter. Some of these images or mosaics are well known. However, there is also a lot of 'ugly' black and white images. This post contains a selection of these ugly images. In the last 24 hours before closest approach, Voyager 1 took a lot of clear filter images with its narrow angle camera together with context images with the wide angle camera. There are also some orange, green and violet filtered narrow angle images from the first half of this period. Many of these hi-res images are low contrast, fuzzy and underexposed and in many cases their location on Jupiter is far from obvious despite the context images. The resolution is typically 5-7 km/pixel. I usually selected images that show something interesting; there are also many low contrast and almost featureless images that are not included.

Thanks to the many spectacular hi-res images from Juno, today many of these images are probably mainly of historical interest. Nevertheless it is interesting to take a detailed look at them. With the benefit of hindsight it turns out that many of the interesting small scale features visible in the JunoCam images are also visible in these Voyager 1 images. The resolution of the JunoCam images is typically higher though and the image quality far better. The color in the JunoCam images is also very useful for distinguishing between various features.

What follows is a series of posts containing 'ugly' hi-res Voyager 1 images of Jupiter. Global, schematic context renders of Jupiter are also included. There are two versions of each hi-res image, a version without any contrast enhancements or filtering and a version with contrast enhancement and in some cases also some sharpening. Unless otherwise noted the hi-res image are clear filter images.
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 6 2019, 12:05 AM
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A few of the images I'm posting have appeared in earlier posts here (see e.g. http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&p=163825 and http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=6684 ) but most of them have not been posted here before.

This is a context image for the first three hi-res images. These hi-res images were obtained when Voyager 1 was about 1.3 million km from Jupiter's center.

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[A] Image C1636530 (violet filter):
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[B] Image C1636628 (green filter):
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[C] Image C1636652 (green filter). In my opinion this is an especially interesting image; it will be discussed further in another post that includes a higher resolution image that probably shows related features.
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 6 2019, 12:15 AM
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The remaining hi-res images I'm posting (18 in total) all have significantly higher resolution than the images posted above. They are in the order they were obtained; during that time Voyager 1's distance from Jupiter's center dropped from 632960 km to 497580 km.

This is a schematic context render for these images. The images themselves appear in the following posts.

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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 6 2019, 12:42 AM
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[A] Image C1638035. This is a very interesting image that looked extremely weird to me when I took my first really close look at it almost 10 years ago. The strange features in the upper half of the image near the right edge are located at planetographic latitude ~7.7 degrees south. I suspect these features are similar to the features in the lower resolution image [C] in the post that appeared above; the features in that image are located between planetographic latitudes 3 and 6 degrees south. It has been pointed out by John Rogers in his Juno PJ15 report that similar features probably appear at higher resolution in some of the JunoCam images (see e.g. JunoCam image PJ15_30).
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[B] Image C1638047:
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[C] Image C1638049. This image (and also images [B] and [D]) apparently shows some of the relatively small, bright high altitude clouds familiar from JunoCam images:

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[D] Image C1638051:
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[E] Image C1638055:

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[F] Image C1638059:
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 6 2019, 12:50 AM
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[G] Image C1638101. Shows features familar from the JunoCam images, e.g. a spiral-shaped storm near top and some small-scale cloud shadows.
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[H] Image C1638109. A relatively (but not completely) uniform and featureless image:
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[I] Image C1638111:

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[J] Image C1638117:
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[K] Image C1638155:

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[L] Image C1638159. Cloud shadows and a nice, spiral-shaped storm:
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 6 2019, 01:02 AM
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[M] Image C1638201. Of the thousands of Voyager Jupiter images, this is the image you want to look at if you want to see cloud shadows and obvious vertical relief in Jupiter's clouds:
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[N] Image C1638321:
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[O] Image C1638329.

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[P] Image C1638333. Clearly shows some of the small, bright high altitude clouds:
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[Q] Image C1638335. Here the context image is rather blurry so it's difficult to tell exactly what's going on here. I might look for a lower-res context image from images taken one Jovian day earlier:
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[R] Image C1638337:

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Bjorn Jonsson
post Mar 6 2019, 01:05 AM
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And this completes this series of posts containing 'ugly' high resolution Voyager 1 images. Later I might post additional discussion of some of these images. In particular it's interesting to compare some of them to the new and higher quality JunoCam images.
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john_s
post Mar 6 2019, 03:01 AM
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Thanks Bjorn! Your "ugly" pictures are beautiful, and a browsing them was a perfect way to commemorate the anniversary. I spent that day, at a provincial UK university, being very frustrated that I didn't know what was going on- too bad we didn't have UMSF back then!

John
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Bjorn Jonsson
post Apr 17 2019, 08:11 PM
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Ian Regan recently posted a blog entry at the Planetary Society website that contains lots of beautiful images processed from wide angle camera (WAC) image data:

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs...es-jupiter.html

These are probably the best WAC Voyager Jupiter images I have ever seen; as mentioned in the blog entry, most of the images that previously have been processed are from the narrow angle camera (NAC) data. In a way these WAC images nicely complement the 'ugly' and 'postage-stamp' hi-res NAC images I posted here at UMSF in early March.
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