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Nasa announces new rover mission to Mars in 2020
7B8
post Jun 23 2020, 10:00 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jun 22 2020, 10:32 PM) *
More information about the helicopter here: https://trs.jpl.nasa.gov/bitstream/handle/2...L%2317-6243.pdf


Brilliant. Thanks. That answers my question. I'll take away that the landing system is fairly robust in terms of surface properties (soft/hard) but that the area for a test flight should only contain a few rocks higher than 5 cm and a general slope of up to 10 degrees.
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MichaelJWP
post Jun 23 2020, 03:15 PM
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Getting exciting as we approach the launch date.

Just watching the final assembly of the rover and packing for the transit to Mars, along with some great detail pictures of the 'skycrane'.

Was wondering if anyone had any reference to PDFs etc. on the development of this part of the EDL? And the control software?
For example, was this one (or Curiosity's) system tested in any way, as per the helicopter? Or was that impractical and it was all done with simulations and component testing?

Thanks for any detail:)
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MichaelJWP
post Jun 25 2020, 09:26 AM
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QUOTE (MichaelJWP @ Jun 23 2020, 03:15 PM) *
Getting exciting as we approach the launch date.

Just watching the final assembly of the rover and packing for the transit to Mars, along with some great detail pictures of the 'skycrane'.

Was wondering if anyone had any reference to PDFs etc. on the development of this part of the EDL? And the control software?
For example, was this one (or Curiosity's) system tested in any way, as per the helicopter? Or was that impractical and it was all done with simulations and component testing?

Thanks for any detail:)

Answering my own post here but managed to locate a few interesting PDFs about the Descent Stage for MSL/Curiosity. Not sure how much of the system has been upgraded for this mission though.
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Jim In ILLINOIS
post Jun 25 2020, 10:06 PM
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Launch Window: July 22 - Aug. 11, 2020

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

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mcaplinger
post Jun 26 2020, 12:02 AM
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QUOTE (MichaelJWP @ Jun 25 2020, 01:26 AM) *
Not sure how much of the system has been upgraded for this mission though.

A good source of information is the JPL Tech Report Server at https://trs.jpl.nasa.gov . Go there and search for "skycrane". See, for example, https://trs.jpl.nasa.gov/bitstream/handle/2...L%2316-2401.pdf


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rlorenz
post Jun 27 2020, 02:05 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jun 16 2020, 12:44 PM) *
When I said "fluid loop" I meant "fluid loop heated by the RTG". Look at the Cassini and Galileo examples, that had big RTGs and a whole bunch of little RHUs, leaving all the RTG heat just being wasted into space. Of course fluid loops have their own problems.


Technically there were fluid loops in the Cassini RTGs, but they were for cooling during ground handling - they didnt take the heat to the spacecraft. There was some exploitation of conducted/radiated heat in keeping the propulsion system a bit warm, but in fact there were shields to keep the RTGs from radiating too much heat onto the instruments.

A recent example of a non-RTG non-rover pumped fluid loop is Parker Solar Probe.

Dragonfly (which you could not unreasonably describe as a rover) will use a fluid loop, in the same way as Curiosity.
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Tom Dahl
post Jun 28 2020, 11:49 PM
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QUOTE (rlorenz @ Jun 26 2020, 09:05 PM) *
Technically there were fluid loops in the Cassini RTGs, but they were for cooling during ground handling - they didnt take the heat to the spacecraft. There was some exploitation of conducted/radiated heat in keeping the propulsion system a bit warm, but in fact there were shields to keep the RTGs from radiating too much heat onto the instruments.

For that matter, the Viking landers had a fluid loop, also primarily used during ground handling to keep the lander interior cool (each of the landers' two RTGs produced more heat in Earth's sea-level-pressure and warmish atmosphere environment than in vacuum or on the surface of Mars). The coolant loop was also used during the two-day terminal sterilization cycle when the lander was baked in a giant oven, to pump sterile hot water through the loop to heat the lander interior more quickly than would otherwise occur due to the very effective body insulation.

During portions of the on-surface mission corresponding to Mars local winter, heat from the RTGs was conducted into the lander via automatic Thermal Switches.
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Antdoghalo
post Jul 2 2020, 11:20 AM
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Launch delayed to the 30th due to rocket sensor issue. They are extending the optimistic launch window to the 15th of August.
https://www.mynews13.com/fl/orlando/ap-onli...eks-left-to-fly


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Antdoghalo
post Jul 22 2020, 12:53 AM
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Here is a Google Earth overlay showing the rover/drone landing site. It has a geologic overlay map and a HiRISE image covering most of the ellipse. Would do the same for Tianwen but... it's just a giant polygon over Utopia.
Attached File(s)
Attached File  Mars_2020_Rover__Perserverance_.kmz ( 2.99K ) Number of downloads: 100
 


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Steve G
post Jul 31 2020, 10:05 PM
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I'm curious about MOXIE. It separates oxygen from the carbon in CO2. The Oxygen is released as a gas, but what form will the carbon be?
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mcaplinger
post Jul 31 2020, 10:34 PM
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QUOTE (Steve G @ Jul 31 2020, 02:05 PM) *
I'm curious about MOXIE. It separates oxygen from the carbon in CO2. The Oxygen is released as a gas, but what form will the carbon be?

Dumped as gaseous carbon monoxide and unseparated CO2. It's worth noting that AFAIK the O2 is not actually collected, just measured to see that it existed. You could ask how useful this really is, but I'm not a chemist so my opinion doesn't count.

https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/marsdust2017/pdf/6036.pdf


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Marvin
post Aug 3 2020, 05:55 PM
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QUOTE (Antdoghalo @ Jul 21 2020, 07:53 PM) *
Here is a Google Earth overlay showing the rover/drone landing site. It has a geologic overlay map and a HiRISE image covering most of the ellipse. Would do the same for Tianwen but... it's just a giant polygon over Utopia.


Thanks for that.

I wonder what route the rover will take? Here is a wild guess: W then SW until it finds a way up the escarpment:

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