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Late 'night' Phoenix Observations.
3488
post Jul 12 2008, 08:55 PM
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Hi everyone.

Phoenix on Sol 46 have returned images of the Sun above the Northern Horizon, just before midnight.

Sun 11:14 PM local time.
Attached Image


Sun 11:16 PM local time.
Attached Image


Sun 11:26 PM local time.
Attached Image


Andrew Brown.


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"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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Stu
post Jul 12 2008, 09:10 PM
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Thanks!

I know that's just a big flarey... flare above a block of black, but boy, do I love that top image...!!! biggrin.gif


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3488
post Jul 12 2008, 09:29 PM
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QUOTE (Stu @ Jul 12 2008, 10:10 PM) *
Thanks!

I know that's just a big flarey... flare above a block of black, but boy, do I love that top image...!!! biggrin.gif


Hi Stu,

Yes I know, I do not think there is much that can be done about the 'blooming', part of the problem with using CCDs in high contrast conditions, but yes, I agree, I too love that top image. Suspect the top image was a shorter exposure.

Also RAC image @ 11:29 PM Sol 46. Note how different the illumination is.
Attached Image


As above but on Sol 47 @ 12:07 AM.
Attached Image


Sun above horizon: Sol 47 @ 12:29 AM local time.
Attached Image


Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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Stu
post Jul 12 2008, 10:56 PM
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IF those three images in today's release actually are R, G & B images, and IF I've got my colour balance right, then here's a colour view of Phoenix's night sky...

Attached Image


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3488
post Jul 12 2008, 11:19 PM
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Thank you very much Stu.

Yes IMO that is pretty well spot on. Just checked again on the U of A site, but there is nothing new. Perhaps in the next download? It's great to see these near midnight observations.

Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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imipak
post Jul 13 2008, 07:57 AM
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Thanks Stu and all, that's a keeper. I love such simple, almost abstract images where the power comes from the context.

At some point as the season changes there will be prolonged semi-sunsets, hopefully the CCD bleed problem will be mitigated somewhat - I'd love to see something like the Oppy "sunset at Meridiani" image, or even a simulated multiple exposures shot compiled over many days -- something like, say, http://www.eaglestation.com/sunsets/620-2197.jpg .(That's just a random pick from a quick google.)



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3488
post Jul 13 2008, 08:25 PM
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Hi imipak, what you suggested with the Midnight Sun montage you linked to, is exactly what I have already suggested to the Phoenix team.

Thought this may be interesting to share.

Changing illumination during half a sol 46 - 47 from the RAC, local time, Scandia Colles.

12:09 Hrs Sol 46.
Attached Image


19:25 Hrs Sol 46.
Attached Image


20:45 Hrs Sol 46.
Attached Image


22:36 Hrs Sol 46.
Attached Image


23:20 Hrs Sol 46.

Attached Image


00:06 Hrs Sol 47.
Attached Image


00:58 Hrs Sol 47.
Attached Image


Andrew Brown.


--------------------
"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before". Linda Morabito on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.
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djellison
post Jul 13 2008, 08:49 PM
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There's no need to fill the UMSF server by downloading and then attaching all the Phoenix imagery in question - simply provide links to it at the Phoenix website.
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slinted
post Jul 14 2008, 04:37 PM
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Here's an little preview of what I think we'll see in the midnight sun images, once we see an official release. What I did isn't accurate. Frankly, it's completely made up. I even left in the rainbow of CCD bleed as a reminder of how not-real it is. I tried to match the look of the Gusev sunset, but since the brightness and 'blue-ness' of the halo are dependent on dust levels, it may end up looking completely different (did I mention the image is made up? smile.gif ). I can't wait to see what the SSI team can do with them. This view will be as awe inspiring and (hopefully) popular as the now iconic Spirit image.

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djellison
post Jul 14 2008, 07:39 PM
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QUOTE (slinted @ Jul 14 2008, 05:37 PM) *
I even left in the rainbow of CCD bleed


And it's very pretty smile.gif
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Paul Fjeld
post Jul 15 2008, 04:08 AM
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QUOTE (3488 @ Jul 13 2008, 04:25 PM) *
Thought this may be interesting to share.
Changing illumination during half a sol 46 - 47 from the RAC, local time, Scandia Colles.

I really don't understand why the shadows, which are very distinct during the day, should be so washed out at midnight. Is the sky that much more lit up by a low sun? Is there a good deal of backfill lighting by the midnight facing surfaces of Phoenix... (no). Very odd and disturbing for a guy who has been trying to paint that scene for the last month (with little success).

Paul
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CosmicRocker
post Jul 15 2008, 04:32 AM
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I suspect that if you were to look at the exposure lengths of those images, you would find that the "shutter" remained open longer when there was less light.


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...Tom

I'm not a Space Fan, I'm a Space Exploration Enthusiast.
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fredk
post Jul 15 2008, 03:38 PM
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QUOTE (Paul Fjeld @ Jul 15 2008, 04:08 AM) *
I really don't understand why the shadows, which are very distinct during the day, should be so washed out at midnight.

I noticed that too. The ratio of scattered light (via the sky) to direct sunlight is much higher when the sun is close to the horizon, because the air is so dusty, and low sunlight must pass through lots of dust. Think of the dust storm last year - there was so much dust that shadows became much less distinct for the rovers, even at midday.

On earth you can see the same effect, but it's less noticable on clear days because on earth more of the scattered light is from air molecules than dust. Think of a smoggy or smoky day on earth.
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Ant103
post Jul 15 2008, 04:03 PM
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Hi,

Here is a try to make a mosaic with the two frames to have the midnight's sun. Removed manually CCD flare.


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Paul Fjeld
post Jul 15 2008, 04:14 PM
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Okay, that makes sense. I would have thought it would have been like the Opportunity low sun anyway - perhaps even more pronounced. The midnight shots are maybe a little more exposed, but I don't think so much that it would wash out a shadow line completely, especially since the lit parts aren't blown out. The anti-sun sky must be bright too then!

Paul
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