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Vera Rubin Ridge
PaulH51
post Jun 19 2017, 02:01 AM
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Impressive work debayering / processing those MastCams smile.gif


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atomoid
post Jun 19 2017, 09:46 PM
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Thanks for the Sketchfabs Sean, I will say it enhances my quality of life flying around future MSL terrain like this!
Here's an interssting composition from sol1729, plus an obligartory sol1728 stereo crosseye.

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elakdawalla
post Jun 19 2017, 10:53 PM
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Every time I think the rock textures can't get weirder, Curiosity proves me wrong. Thanks for the 3D views.

And Sean, those Sketchfab VR things are awesome.


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jvandriel
post Jun 20 2017, 02:28 PM
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The Navcam L view on Sol 1730

Jan van Driel

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Steve5304
post Jun 21 2017, 12:21 PM
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QUOTE (atomoid @ Jun 19 2017, 10:46 PM) *
Thanks for the Sketchfabs Sean, I will say it enhances my quality of life flying around future MSL terrain like this!
Here's an interssting composition from sol1729, plus an obligartory sol1728 stereo crosseye.

Attached Image



That is interesting...I bet that is so brittle it would shatter like glass at if you dropped a pin. ...looks like Plaster at a right angle on potato chip ledge. I guess the low gravity atmosphere allows brittle and unsound structures to last longer than here on earth. Reminds me of when people mix copper and caste pipes a process begins called electrolysis which destroy both and you get pits, waves and right angles just like that rock. Interesting

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Sean
post Jun 21 2017, 01:00 PM
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I have updated the Vera Rubin Sketchfab model to color...



Vera Rubin Ridge @Sketchfab

How to get started with Sketchfab VR








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Phil Stooke
post Jun 22 2017, 05:06 AM
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This is a circular version of Jan's 1730 panorama. Many of the blocks are large enough to show up clearly in HiRISE images.

Phil

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Sean
post Jun 22 2017, 12:08 PM
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MSL 1732...


Maybe our path onto Vera Rubin Ridge is just left of center?... looks inviting!

Detail...




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Art Martin
post Jun 22 2017, 06:09 PM
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A few questions to those in the know.

I saw today that a solar conjunction is coming up soon. What is the exact timing of that and do we plan on being atop Vera Rubin Ridge throughout it?

Secondly, because we've been climbing up this hill, the giant mesas at the base of Mt. Sharp have been hidden from view. I would imagine that the view from atop Vera Rubin Ridge will once again expose that dramatic geography and that they'll be considerably closer than when they disappeared. The photographs should be stunning. Am I right in my assumption?

Third, are there any upcoming sections of the trek ahead that appear particularly perilous with real questions as to whether the rover can navigate over the rugged and steep terrain especially with the degraded wheels?

Lastly, I've seen a number of daily updates that talk about doing further drill diagnosis but no indications at all about the outlook on being able to use this tool. Any insight on this?
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Holder of the Tw...
post Jun 22 2017, 06:57 PM
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In regards to the drill, Emily Lakdawalla posted on the Planetary Society's blog last week:

Curiosity Update

QUOTE
A problem with the brake on the rover's drill feed mechanism that occurred back in December is still preventing its use, and there's currently no estimate of when (if ever) it will return to action.


QUOTE
As Curiosity approaches the top of the Murray formation and journeys into new rock units, it would be a really good time for the drill to come back into service. Unfortunately, there is no estimate for when that may happen. Engineers have been hard at work testing the drill, trying to develop methods to reliably advance the drill feed. Project scientist Ashwin Vasavada tells me that the experiments they've been performing have borne some fruit but have not led to a solution that allows the drill feed to function reliably.

They're shifting now from trying electronic solutions to the balky drill feed (like adjusting voltages, using one or the other or both brake coils) to mechanical solutions (experimenting with the orientation of the drill and with the use of vibration and percussion at different levels). And because it's been so long since the last successful drill attempt, on sol 1495 at Sebina, the project is beginning to expend some effort to explore some "less standard uses of the drill" that would bypass the use of the drill feed altogether for sampling activity. Let's all hope it doesn't come to that, but I'm glad they're preparing for the possibility that the drill feed mechanism might be unrecoverable.


In regards to the current situation facing the wheels, and the blocky terrain ...

QUOTE
One piece of good news about the changing terrain: despite the increasing blockiness of the Murray, there's been no acceleration in wheel damage. Rover drivers can steer around many of the blocks. Even when wheels have to confront rock, Murray formation rock is soft enough that Curiosity's wheels tend to crush it, unlike the Bradbury rocks that used to puncture the wheels' thin skin.

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jvandriel
post Jun 22 2017, 07:52 PM
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The Navcam L view on Sol 1732-1733.

Jan van Driel


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Sean
post Jun 23 2017, 12:11 AM
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A simulated Curiosity ( scaled by HiRISE ) climbs Vera Rubin Ridge ( Sol 1732 )


Detail...


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PaulH51
post Jun 23 2017, 02:56 AM
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Quick and Dirty 10x2 RMI telephoto mosaic featuring a small section of 'Northern Neck' targeted on sol 1734. One of the frames (lower center) was not available as an enhanced data product when I assembled the mosaic. I've patched it as well as possible within the limitations of MS ICE and my basic skills. Hoping for a better version to be posted here smile.gif
EDIT: I've identified the target area on a crop from Sean's CG mosaic
Attached Image
Attached Image

Mods please feel free to delete as better versions are posted
PS Great work Sean, love the CG Curi on the Ridge smile.gif


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djellison
post Jun 23 2017, 06:14 AM
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QUOTE (jvandriel @ Jun 22 2017, 12:52 PM) *
The Navcam L view on Sol 1732-1733.

Jan van Driel


Attached Image


Yeahhhh....my bad on cutting that tiny piece off Mt Sharp with the upper tier. Couldn't convince myself I could still get all of VRR if I nudged it any more left. Fingers crossed I can try again on Monday.
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jvandriel
post Jun 23 2017, 01:25 PM
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The Navcam L view on Sol 1734

Jan van Driel

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