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Neptunian System Imaging
jccwrt
post Mar 24 2015, 01:32 AM
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It's a shame to hear they're not too useful, but I'm not surprised given the somewhat spotty quality of the images.
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DrShank
post Mar 31 2015, 11:52 AM
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this was my attempt 20 years ago to cobble together a complete mosaic of the Neptune ring system. by coincidence, none of the arcs was in view in any of the shots taken during this long sequence. reminds me i should redo this and try to get rid of some of the artifacts . . .
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vikingmars
post Mar 31 2015, 01:09 PM
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QUOTE (DrShank @ Mar 31 2015, 01:52 PM) *
this was my attempt 20 years ago to cobble together a complete mosaic of the Neptune ring system. by coincidence, none of the arcs was in view in any of the shots taken during this long sequence. reminds me i should redo this and try to get rid of some of the artifacts . . .

Wow ! What a nice image ! Thanks a lot smile.gif
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MarcF
post Jun 24 2016, 02:48 PM
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Nice new pictures of Neptune by Hubble, confirming a new Dark Spot with its bright companion in the southern hemisphere !
Reminds me the great time of Voyager 2 flyby. Even if these Hubble images do not have the Voyager 2 resolution, they are quite good and confirm that great science could be made from Earth orbit !
Can't wait the first planetary views from JWST... and from a Neptune-dedicated mission (?)
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/h...spot-on-neptune
Regards,
Marc.
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jccwrt
post Sep 19 2016, 02:51 AM
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A few recent Neptune projects:

Here's a narrow angle frame from August 20, I think there's a JPL version floating around. However, it still has the scanline artifacts, and is so deeply saturated that it looks like a monochrome image that's been painted a single tone of blue.


Narrow angle frame of the Great Dark Spot rotating into view on late on August 23. I did some blending of narrow angle clear and green filter images to get more of the limb in view while retaining some of the sharpness of the cirrus clouds. Color is taken from wide-angle images taken simultaneously. Some of the color noise has been suppressed using the Deep Sky Colors HLVG plug-in. Not super happy with the results but I think it's the best I'm going to get considering the available data.



Finally a departing shot of Neptune and Triton on August 31. Dark Spot Jr. is near the cusp on the left, as well as a cluster of cirrus clouds that often popped up over the spot. Dark cloud bands around the south pole are also unusually clear in this image. Not sure why.
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Floyd
post Sep 19 2016, 10:51 AM
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Very nice. The geometry of the Neptune and Triton image is stunning.


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Ian R
post Nov 14 2016, 05:27 AM
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The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), is a new instrument designed by Princeton to observe exoplanets, and works in conjunction with the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii. It has also returned a quite astonishing image of Neptune:

http://www.universetoday.com/131903/prince...d-nearby-stars/



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JRehling
post Nov 15 2016, 07:10 PM
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That's a great image; I've seen an even sharper image of Ganymede, which I won't link because it's off topic. And the instrument isn't designed for Neptune but, in a nutshell, instruments with resolutions better than 0.01 arc seconds /pixel are now becoming available, which means that we can track features hundreds of km in size, maybe even under 100 km. That means that Neptune could be tracked almost continuously for the ~3/4 of the year when it's not lost in daylight. And echo that for Uranus, with 50% better detail. Indeed, with a lowly 6-inch telescope, I've imaged clouds in visible light on Uranus, which, owing to the seasons, Voyager 2 didn't even accomplish! It's a new era for the outer planets.
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algorimancer
post Nov 15 2016, 08:55 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Nov 15 2016, 01:10 PM) *
...I've seen an even sharper image of Ganymede, which I won't link because it's off topic...

I'd love to see that Ganymede image. Any chance you could post the link, perhaps in the appropriate category?
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JRehling
post Nov 16 2016, 06:23 PM
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QUOTE (algorimancer @ Nov 15 2016, 01:55 PM) *
I'd love to see that Ganymede image. Any chance you could post the link, perhaps in the appropriate category?


I posted it here:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=8253
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Astroboy
post Sep 6 2017, 04:06 PM
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1989-08-27T20:48:45-21:06:21, stabilized and interpolated to 1 frame per 96 seconds (I wanted to match the maximum frame rate the Voyagers were capable of). Some tiny bits of it don't interpolate well, but the compression of the gif hides those errors.



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TheAnt
post Sep 8 2017, 01:22 PM
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QUOTE (Astroboy @ Sep 6 2017, 06:06 PM) *
1989-08-27T20:48:45-21:06:21, stabilized and interpolated to 1 frame per 96 seconds.


Fantastic glimpse you provided us with there. =)
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