IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

14 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Cape York - The "Lakelands", Starting sol 2703
Phil Stooke
post Sep 10 2011, 02:02 AM
Post #31


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5726
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



A circular version of mhoward's nice new panorama.

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dilo
post Sep 10 2011, 05:23 AM
Post #32


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2492
Joined: 15-January 05
From: center Italy
Member No.: 150



Marvellous, guys! Starts to recall me Spirit Odyssey on Husband hill!


--------------------
I always think before posting! - Marco -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jvandriel
post Sep 10 2011, 12:08 PM
Post #33


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1346
Joined: 22-April 05
From: Ridderkerk, Netherlands
Member No.: 353



Another Navcam L0 view taken on Sol 2710.

Jan van Driel

Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fredk
post Sep 10 2011, 03:09 PM
Post #34


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3234
Joined: 17-January 05
Member No.: 152



Some comments on Chester Lake (and a false colour (?!) pancam view) here. "Paraphrased" from Squyres:
QUOTE
The new target should be IDD'd... it looks bright and Noachian itself... Need to build a nice story here and relate it to the Tisdales... We think there might be a coating, so we'll have to choose a target carefully and at least APXS it... Consider RAT'ing it to get into its guts...

It is something entirely new, or SOS ("Same Old Sulfates")? This is our first major Noachian target, so let's make it count.
I wonder what about it "looks Noachian"...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Matt Lenda
post Sep 10 2011, 04:12 PM
Post #35


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 98
Joined: 17-July 11
From: Pasadena, CA
Member No.: 6066



QUOTE (fredk @ Sep 10 2011, 07:09 AM) *
Some comments on Chester Lake (and a false colour (?!) pancam view) here. "Paraphrased" from Squyres:I wonder what about it "looks Noachian"...

Had me fooled, too. I asked myself that all day.

The EOSs and SOWG meetings are particularly cryptic these days; these guys talk and head and shoulders above my comprehension!

-m
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
marsophile
post Sep 10 2011, 05:50 PM
Post #36


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 313
Joined: 10-September 08
Member No.: 4338



Maybe it is the orbital images of that locality that look Noachian rather than that specific rock.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Sep 10 2011, 06:45 PM
Post #37


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5726
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



The new target is Salisbury... my home town! - I mean the one in Wiltshire, not one of the Salisburys in the colonies.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Sep 10 2011, 07:13 PM
Post #38


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5548
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Another magnifcent view...

Attached Image


Full size version here: http://twitpic.com/6iynsp/full


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
serpens
post Sep 11 2011, 01:22 AM
Post #39


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 432
Joined: 17-February 09
Member No.: 4605



QUOTE (fredk @ Sep 10 2011, 04:09 PM) *
I wonder what about it "looks Noachian"...

It looks like an impact breccia, integral to the weathered rim of a crater that pre-dated the Meridiani sediment formation. Could it be anything other than a Noachian construct?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bill Harris
post Sep 11 2011, 09:28 AM
Post #40


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2344
Joined: 30-October 04
Member No.: 105



True that, Serpens. The geomorph of this area is more complex and convoluted than we we assume or possibly can imagine. It's like standing on a small chunk of the Canadian Shield and figuring out depositional environments with a handlens and a Brunton.

Ah, the comparative simplicity of seven years on the playa may have spoilt us...

--Bill (almost giddy with anticipation over impending MI's and APXS) smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SteveM
post Sep 11 2011, 03:37 PM
Post #41


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 246
Joined: 5-February 06
Member No.: 675



Could some of you tell a non-geologist what kinds of questions the new detail we're encountering might answer. What more will we learn about the history of Mars -- besides the overly mentioned issue of water.

Steve M
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Sep 11 2011, 06:11 PM
Post #42


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 5726
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



We don't know all the details, but it seems the sulfate and blueberry rocks of the plains we've just left were formed in a relatively brief period in the middle of Martian history. Water was there, and probably very salty and foul-tasting water! - not very pleasant for life. These rocks at Cape York are much older, and may have formed in very different conditions. What we hope to learn is, what were those conditions? Warm or cold? Reducing or oxidizing conditions? Acidic or alkaline? Lots of water or only a bit? Water in the ground, or melting out of overlying snow? So we would expect evidence of water, but it's the environmental conditions that are most important.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bill Harris
post Sep 11 2011, 08:57 PM
Post #43


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2344
Joined: 30-October 04
Member No.: 105



That is it, exactly. When a rock like basalt weathers, in the presence of water, it breaks down into clay minerals (the phyllosilicates in the news) and various anions and cations ("minerals" dissolved in the water). The type of clays, and other weathering byproducts, is dependent on the ionic makeup of the water to begin with, as well as the temperature and whether the environment was oxidizing or reducing. By looking at the weathered zone on the hill, we can tell what the conditions were way back then.

--Bill


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Stu
post Sep 11 2011, 09:29 PM
Post #44


The Poet Dude
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 5548
Joined: 15-March 04
From: Kendal, Cumbria, UK
Member No.: 60



Thanks Bill and Phil, that's a really clear, really useful explanation of the significance of this place. Much appreciated.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post Sep 11 2011, 10:00 PM
Post #45


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3154
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



There is the complication of deciding whether any clays that may be found were formed by weathering of the basalts before the impact or after brecciation and deposition on the crater rim. It's not an easy puzzle.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

14 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th October 2014 - 06:01 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.