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ExoMars
nogal
post Oct 15 2019, 09:18 PM
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An update on the progress of the ExoMars parachute can be found at

http://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Hum...achute_progress

The article also includes an update on the overall mission progress.
Fernando
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Explorer1
post Dec 20 2019, 01:39 AM
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Looks like some progress has been made in ground tests with the JPL assistance; the high-altitude tests are coming soon too: http://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Hum...Mars_parachutes

Of course, the true test will be on the red planet....
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Quetzalcoatl
post Feb 28 2020, 03:02 PM
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Bonjour à tous,

The problem of parachutes to land on the red planet the European rover Rosalind Franklin and its surface platform Kazachok built by Russia will most likely result in the postponement of the Exomars mission to the next (but farther) launch window, in about two years.

The European and Russian space agencies are to meet on 12 March to make a final decision on this subject.

Until then, it was expected that the launch would take place in July this year from the cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. But the problems found during parachute deployment tests will certainly not be solved in time.

An ESA spokesperson said:

"An operational review of the project took place between ESA and Roscosmos at the end of January. A preliminary assessment was sent on 3 February to the heads of space agencies, Jan Wörner of ESA and Dmitry Rogozin of Roscosmos."

"Programme leaders were asked to submit an updated plan and schedule covering all remaining activities necessary for the authorisation to launch. This plan will be reviewed by the two heads of agencies who will meet on 12 March to jointly agree on next steps."

With this deadline, we are waiting for a public announcement on a possible confirmation of a launch in July or, more probably, of a two-year postponement at the next window favorable for a launch towards March.

The modifications on the parachute system that have been undertaken since the discovery of the problems must be validated, with the help of the JPL, by a last test at high altitude which was initially planned during February. Unfortunately, a change in NASA’s schedule would have postponed this indispensable test in March. huh.gif

In its space section, the BBC informs us of another complication concerning especially the rover Rosalind Franklin.

Thales Alenia Space reportedly discovered a defect in the hinges of the solar panels of the rover. The problem was found on the rover test model and on the flight model during the thermal and vacuum tests. The glue that was holding the hinges in place took off. Engineers are working to solve this problem. It is planned to replace the glue with bolts. The margins for the maximum payload are such that it’s not really going to be a problem.

In two weeks we should be fixed the fate of this launch in July 2020 ...
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 3 2020, 02:59 AM
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Many thanks for giving us these details. Sad - but much appreciated. And remember MSL was delayed 2 years, and many other missions have been before. You have to do it right!

Phil



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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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climber
post Mar 3 2020, 11:41 AM
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Merci serpent à plume, espérons que ça ne deviendra pas un serpent de mer.
Sorry guys, no way to put this in English...


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Quetzalcoatl
post Mar 3 2020, 01:52 PM
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Thank you, Phil, smile.gif

Adiu Climby, tongue.gif

"High-altitude parachute testing is now scheduled for the end of March," an ESA spokesperson told Spacenews.
The delay occurred despite six ground tests demonstrating successful parachute extraction, a phase where damage had been caused in previous high altitude tests.
However, the Exomars mission could be postponed even before these new tests are carried out. Heads of ESA and Roscosmos are expected to meet next week to discuss next steps following the mission progress report.

Extract from the source :

https://spacenews.com/exomars-parachute-tes...n-faces-review/
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atomoid
post Mar 3 2020, 11:12 PM
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QUOTE (climber @ Mar 3 2020, 03:41 AM) *
Merci serpent à plume, espérons que ça ne deviendra pas un serpent de mer.
Sorry guys, no way to put this in English...

well it was worth a try anyway... Thank you feathered snake, let's hope it doesn't become a sea snake.
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Quetzalcoatl
post Mar 4 2020, 03:45 PM
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Well done atomoid. smile.gif

QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 3 2020, 03:59 AM) *
... And remember MSL was delayed 2 years, and many other missions have been before. You have to do it right!

Phil


You’re absolutely right, Phil, a postponement is not a cancellation. The success of this mission represents a crucial step for European and Russian space exploration, the people know full well what is at stake.

I would have been particularly interested to see SEIS (the Insight seismometer) work in association with SEM (the Russian seismometer installed on the Kazachok platform). For the latter, although I am currently unable to find his technical specifications, I am quite convinced that simultaneous event recordings by the two instruments would bring a real benefit to the analyses of the data.

It is also possible that if the launch of Exomars is postponed for two years, a possible extension of Insight’s mission will allow my wish to be fulfilled.

In addition, I am convinced that the ability to work two machines at the same time on the surface of Mars would not stop at the only example I give, we can also think of the search for methane in the atmosphere and other similar things, when we know that surface and orbital measurements are sometimes very dissonant...

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climber
post Mar 12 2020, 11:17 AM
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Jan Wöerner, ESA director, announce ExoMars launch has been delayed. Official ESA com to be issued.


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Quetzalcoatl
post Mar 12 2020, 03:27 PM
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In addition to the announcement of this news by climber:

http://www.esa.int/Newsroom/Press_Releases..._Planet_in_2022

Cautious, predictable but frustrating.
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PaulH51
post May 15 2020, 11:10 AM
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ExoMars rover upgrades and parachute tests... (detailed ESA News release) Link
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Roby72
post May 15 2020, 09:20 PM
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QUOTE (PaulH51 @ May 15 2020, 12:10 PM) *
ExoMars rover upgrades and parachute tests... (detailed ESA News release) Link


ExoMars parachute is more than double the diameter of Curiositys - is there a table of other planetary mission parachutes (Viking, Huygens, Galileo-Probe, ...) to compare them easily ?
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Tom Dahl
post May 16 2020, 04:35 AM
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The Viking decelerator (parachute) was 53 feet in diameter, for what that's worth.
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rlorenz
post May 16 2020, 04:19 PM
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QUOTE (Roby72 @ May 15 2020, 04:20 PM) *
ExoMars parachute is more than double the diameter of Curiositys - is there a table of other planetary mission parachutes (Viking, Huygens, Galileo-Probe, ...) to compare them easily ?


"Planetary Landers and Entry Probes" by Ball et al. (Cambridge University Press) has a whole chapter on descent through atmospheres, including this table (part)
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