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Rev 120-121 - Oct 23-Nov 30, 2009 - Enceladus E7, E8
Juramike
post Nov 22 2009, 02:01 AM
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Snowy ridges of Enceladus:

Attached Image



I took the Cassini Raw N00146709.jpg image, and used the Filter/Video/Deinterlace (even fields, interpolate) filter in Photoshop.

This image was acquired from a distance of 1,855 km.

-Mike

Full Res TIFF (3 Mb - and it's well worth it!) here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31678681@N07/4123688100/

[EDIT: original image and technique changed based on suggestion below, images on flickr and here updated.]


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elakdawalla
post Nov 22 2009, 02:10 AM
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The every-other-line truncation can be fixed quickly in Photoshop by using the Filter -> Video -> De-interlace. You can get a quick and dirty result that way. To refine it a bit, just select the part of the image that has the truncation problem and run the filter on that part.


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Juramike
post Nov 22 2009, 02:16 AM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Nov 21 2009, 09:10 PM) *
The every-other-line truncation can be fixed quickly in Photoshop by using the Filter -> Video -> De-interlace.


Well, by golly, it does. And it's a much better result than the one above....

*sigh*


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jgoldader
post Nov 22 2009, 02:28 AM
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This one

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...5/N00146706.jpg

looks like really heavy rime ice in a freezer that's been too long between defrostings. That texture... it looks too amazing to be real. So beautiful it almost makes you want to cry.

Congrats and THANK YOU, Cassini team!

Jeff
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belleraphon1
post Nov 22 2009, 02:52 AM
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All... more Enceladus and the Rhea images are now availale...

Enceladus
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...5/N00146863.jpg

Rhea
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...5/W00061511.jpg

I have to step away from the pc for awhile.... someone may want toopen a Rhea thread.

Craig
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Loiserl
post Nov 22 2009, 04:01 AM
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Here's a link to the website of mine where I have posted a short, 3-frame animation of Cassini's aproach to the sourthern pole of Enceladus.

Link: http://www.espaciosur.com.ar/2009/11/cassi...ercamiento.html


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Astro0
post Nov 22 2009, 04:41 AM
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4-frame surface closeup.
Attached Image
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nprev
post Nov 22 2009, 04:42 AM
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This is literally lunacy. I keep staring at these Enceladus images & they just...won't...stop...being...overwhelming. Can scarcely believe what we're seeing, really.

Astro0, really like your artistic composition; it's frame-worthy!

EDIT: And as I wrote that, you posted that terrific mosaic! (BTW, dunno how the hell we're gonna land something there someday, to say nothing of comm; talk about multipath potential!)


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Shaka
post Nov 22 2009, 06:06 AM
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Was I born too early, or too late? huh.gif
I feel what it was like to skip across the surface of the Moon.
I'll never know what it's like to lean over the lip of a geyser on Enceladus.
sad.gif
Astro0 understands, but his vision graces UMSF, when it should cover the front page of The Times and all the rest.


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Stu
post Nov 22 2009, 08:01 AM
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QUOTE (ngunn @ Nov 21 2009, 11:36 PM) *
However it appears to be left-right inverted relative to others posted here. Is it just me? I know it's late . . .


You're right, it is. I was, as usual, "just messing about". smile.gif I leave it to others here to be 1000% accurate.


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Stu
post Nov 22 2009, 08:20 AM
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Astro0 - those two latest image creatiosn of yours are shockingly beautiful. Thanks for sharing them with all of us here.

Don't know about anyone else, but this encounter with Enceladus has made me feel an almost childlike sense of wonder again. I thought I'd have to wait maybe another 20 years to actually see the plumes coming out of Enceladus, on images taken by a post-Cassini orbiter, yet there they are, and I've been able to mess about with them and not just gawp at them.

This is nuts, absolutely nuts. On exceptionally still and clear evenings here in Cumbria I've seen Enceladus through my humble 4.5" scope. It looked just like a pinprick of light close to Saturn, a hole in the black velvet of space made by the point of a needle... now I see it, on these very pages, thanks to the Cassini team and all my friends and fellow explorers here, as a world, a real world, criss-crossed with meandering canyons of ice, covered with fields of snow and slashed by deep, axe-wound gorges out of which gush geysers...

One day people will walk up and down those canyons, running their gloved hands along their sides, maybe stopping to carve out intricate designs in the ice, leaving their mark as humans are always moved to do. One day spacesuited children will bound across those snowfields, boots crump-crumping as they land, laughing and giggling in the low gravity. One day explorers will stand on the edge of Baghdad Sulci and stare wide-mouthed at the beauty of the scene, leaning back to stare up at the geyser erupting out of the ground before them. Seen through the geyser's veil, the Sun will be surrounded by glorious haloes of rainbow-hued light, and the stars above them will shimmer and dance...

And standing there, beside that geyser, they'll wonder how it felt like to be us, here, in 2009, to be the first people to see the beauty of their homeworld, on grainy images taken by a tiny, Mayfly-fragile spaceprobe sent out across the gulf of space by a generation that Wanted To Know.

Amazing.


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jasedm
post Nov 22 2009, 09:18 AM
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Certainly a candidate for most stunning spacecraft encounter this year - breathtaking. Imagine what a radiation-hardened orbiter could achieve at Io - (obviously it could come nowhere near as close to Io's plumes though....)
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dilo
post Nov 22 2009, 11:32 AM
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I was plaiyng with Stu mosaic, in order to enhance weaker plumes parts...
Attached Image

Hope you enjoy this "psychedelic" result!


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ugordan
post Nov 22 2009, 01:27 PM
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Ooh, shiny!
Attached Image


IR3/GRN/UV3 filters, Saturn appears green in this filter combo which I think is kind of neat. Otherwise no color apart from hints of blue at the tiger stripes.


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ngunn
post Nov 22 2009, 02:30 PM
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Amidst the excitement I almost missed this excellent article:
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/cassiniins...nsider20091119/

Thanks for all the wonderful image work folks (now continuing on Rhea also).
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