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MAVEN Orbital Science, Post Siding Spring
atomoid
post Feb 19 2015, 09:19 PM
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such a quiet mission, finally an update was released today: NASA’s MAVEN Spacecraft Completes First Deep Dip Campaign

and another item i didnt notice previously: NASA’s MAVEN Mission Identifies Links in Chain Leading to Atmospheric Loss


Edit: doh!! wrong thread..

ADMIN: Moved to start a new topic of Orbital Science from the start of the deep dip campaign.

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Ron Hobbs
post Mar 18 2015, 04:48 PM
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MAVEN has observed aurora and the mysterious dust cloud, and apparently the LPW has seen it since the beginning of operations.

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2015/march/nasa-...mars/index.html

MAVEN is on the case.
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dvandorn
post Mar 18 2015, 05:30 PM
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Well... if dust is observably being sputtered off of Mars, as these observations suggest, that sort of explains where the red dust covering parts of Phobos and Deimos came from. I had always thought that dust plumes from impacts, even over billions of years, didn't seem like they would provide enough material to cause the pigmentation on the moons we see today. If these solar-wind-generated sputtered air-and-dust plumes have been happening for millennia, and if some fraction of the plumes are accelerated by the solar wind interactions out to the distance of the moons, we then have a process for the material transfer that makes more sense, and explains what we see on the moons.

Also, this shows rather strongly how solar wind interactions with the upper atmosphere could well have sputtered off a relatively thick Martian atmosphere over billions of years, doesn't it? Consider that a lot more gas molecules would get accelerated to escape velocity by such interactions than dust particles, and that we can see how many dust particles have been boosted (enough to account for the red coloration of the moons), and you get a good gut-level appreciation of the long-term effectiveness of the solar wind's sputtering capabilities.

-the other Doug


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Explorer1
post Mar 18 2015, 05:46 PM
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Is this the same cloud detected from Earth based observations, announced last month?
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Paolo
post Mar 19 2015, 08:40 AM
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I don't think so. those were transient water and CO2 clouds, this is a (permanent? ) dust cloud
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elakdawalla
post Aug 31 2015, 08:02 PM
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MAVEN data through May 15, 2015 are now available to the public. I'm not sure what's there; I'm curious what there is to play with from IUVS, which produced pictures like these.


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marsophile
post Nov 4 2015, 08:58 PM
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Press conference Thursday being reported by the Space media.

http://www.space.com/31000-mars-atmosphere...ts-preview.html
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B Bernatchez
post Nov 5 2015, 07:35 PM
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New results at http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/2015/1...ian-atmosphere/.
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marsophile
post Nov 5 2015, 08:54 PM
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I wonder if it is possible that the high-altitude dust is a temporary phenomenon resulting from the comet Siding Spring? The Science paper seems silent on this.
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JRehling
post Nov 6 2015, 07:25 PM
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This morning, I was reading about how ice cores have been used to track the varying abundance of components of Earth's atmosphere, and was wondering about the viability of a mission to do this on Mars. There's plenty of ice in the high latitudes, and it must be chronologically sorted, although the absolute scale might be hard to work out, and highly nonlinear. But it seems like a potentially interesting mission. Tracking the isotopes in H2O and CO2 would be a couple of the more interesting investigations.
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elakdawalla
post Nov 6 2015, 08:44 PM
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QUOTE (marsophile @ Nov 5 2015, 12:54 PM) *
I wonder if it is possible that the high-altitude dust is a temporary phenomenon resulting from the comet Siding Spring? The Science paper seems silent on this.

There was a question related to this at the press briefing, and the answer was that comets make only a minor contribution to the high-altitude dust; that interplanetary dust particles are the major contributor.


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alan
post Oct 17 2016, 08:25 PM
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MAVEN Gives Unprecedented Ultraviolet View of Mars

Attached Image


http://lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/2016/1...t-view-of-mars/

Short movie
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 9 2016, 12:06 AM
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Here is an image of Phobos from Maven. The source is this press release from many months ago - I just noticed it had not been noted here.

http://mars.nasa.gov/news/whatsnew/index.c...amp;NewsID=1893

I just added some different processing of my own. I have inverted it from the published format because I think it is the northern hemisphere which is illuminated (Phobos having seasons just like those of Mars). The background is UV photons scattered by the gas molecules escaping from Mars.

Phil

Attached Image


EDIT: I have found that this image should be flipped left-right. The northern hemisphere is illuminated, and this view is from quite far south with the upper limb near the equator at about 90 degrees east.


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nprev
post Dec 9 2016, 05:47 AM
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Great catch!

I never get tired of images of Phobos or Deimos with Mars in the background in some way. smile.gif


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