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Alsj Mp3s, Apollo audio
GregM
post May 10 2005, 03:25 AM
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So, the capsule lands in the deep blue south pacific sea. The air is fragrant. You are the frogman. You and your frogman buddies get the float collar on, and dingy inflated. You climb on the collar, knock on the hatch. The door opens, you stick your head in, and take a deep breath.....

Sometimes spaceflight isn't so glamourous!

I once read that it was real bad on the long duration Gemini flights. Lots of sweating, no cleaning up, no getting out of your seat, living in your suit for half of the time, don't even imagine going to the bathroom (it's that horrible) - all in the free space of a phone booth.


Major Matt Mason - Space Ranger, never talked about this
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lyford
post May 10 2005, 04:22 PM
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QUOTE (GregM @ May 9 2005, 07:25 PM)
So, the capsule lands in the deep blue south pacific sea. The air is fragrant. You are the frogman. You and your frogman buddies get the float collar on, and dingy inflated. You climb on the collar, knock on the hatch. The door opens, you stick your head in, and take a deep breath.....

Sometimes spaceflight isn't so glamourous!

I once read that it was real bad on the long duration Gemini flights.  Lots of sweating, no cleaning up, no getting out of your seat, living in your suit for half of the time, don't even imagine going to the bathroom (it's that horrible) - all in the free space of a phone booth.


Major Matt Mason - Space Ranger, never talked about this
*

Yes, and I understand at times Mir could be worse than a gym locker room filled with old sweaty socks.... Imagine slipping the surly bonds of Earth and docking in orbit - the hatch opens - PHEW - and thinking "I got 3 more months of this air?????"

Though, according to Shannon Lucid, this reputation is undeserved. On MIR 17, NASA ran its own tests on air quality, and did find some formaldehyde and ethanol levels high... not sure how this relates to "human contributions" to air quality.

And don't get me started on the fungus!

Somehow, you never hear about this stuff when pundits discuss the manned mission to Mars... unsure.gif


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Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
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dvandorn
post May 10 2005, 05:58 PM
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QUOTE (lyford @ May 10 2005, 11:22 AM)
QUOTE (GregM @ May 9 2005, 07:25 PM)
So, the capsule lands in the deep blue south pacific sea. The air is fragrant. You are the frogman. You and your frogman buddies get the float collar on, and dingy inflated. You climb on the collar, knock on the hatch. The door opens, you stick your head in, and take a deep breath.....

Sometimes spaceflight isn't so glamourous!

I once read that it was real bad on the long duration Gemini flights.  Lots of sweating, no cleaning up, no getting out of your seat, living in your suit for half of the time, don't even imagine going to the bathroom (it's that horrible) - all in the free space of a phone booth.


Major Matt Mason - Space Ranger, never talked about this
*

Yes, and I understand at times Mir could be worse than a gym locker room filled with old sweaty socks.... Imagine slipping the surly bonds of Earth and docking in orbit - the hatch opens - PHEW - and thinking "I got 3 more months of this air?????"

Though, according to Shannon Lucid, this reputation is undeserved. On MIR 17, NASA ran its own tests on air quality, and did find some formaldehyde and ethanol levels high... not sure how this relates to "human contributions" to air quality.

And don't get me started on the fungus!

Somehow, you never hear about this stuff when pundits discuss the manned mission to Mars... unsure.gif
*



Yeah -- when they speak of the glories of exploring the Moon, they never talk about things like space adaptation syndrome, which made at least one guy on most every flight queasy enough to vomit. They never talk about the indignities of bowel movements in a capsule no larger than the inside of a Volkswagen Beetle, for which, according to Wally Schirra, the only way to proceed was to get entirely naked and leave yourself a good hour for preparation and clean-up. They never talk about less-than-palatable food, total lack of warm water and food while on the Moon, or struggling into pressure suits that are designed to fit so snugly that, until you actually pressurized them, the neck ring would bite into your shoulders.

Even on the ISS, they never talk about how the only drinking water temperature choices are lukewarm and sort-of-hot, or how the noise level in some parts of the station is such that it could cause permanent hearing degradation if endured for as long as six months at a time.

I always thought SkyLab was on the right track. Hot showers, a refrigerator and freezer for food, an oven and table-top heaters with which to cook their food (making available such meals as lobster thermidor and prime rib), and a nice, big open space to just plain have fun floating around in. Now that was flying in style!

-the other Doug


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“The trouble ain't that there is too many fools, but that the lightning ain't distributed right.” -Mark Twain
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garybeau
post May 21 2005, 04:19 PM
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What a great thread, you guys have an extraordinary memory for detail. I too was 13 in 1969 and watched and read everything I could get my hands on about the Apollo program. At one time or another I had read about most of these incidences, but completely forgot about them until now. I also had set up a camera and took pictures directly from the TV. I remember thinking at the time that this was a once in a lifetime event and that I had to somehow preserve this for the future. Who would have guessed that 36 years later you could get access to so much information with just the click of a button. There is far more material available with easy access today about the Apollo program than there was back then when it was happening.
But I still treasure those grainy photos I took off the TV because they bring me back to a very specific point in time.
Greg, I also have a couple of DVD sets from Spacecraft Films ("The Mighty Saturns" and "Apollo 15") and I agree with you they are well worth the money. There is a lot of footage there that I never saw before and the quality is superb.
But I do miss some of the commentary. I would like to find some footage of the
Apollo 11 landing exactly as it played out on TV with Walter Cronkite’s commentary.
If someone knows of a source where I could find that it would be greatly appreciated.


Gary
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Bob Shaw
post May 21 2005, 09:00 PM
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Yes, it's the 'realite' that counts, the feeling of being there at a point in history which for once wasn't full of pain and blood (think of Apollo 11 as the Omaha Beach of our generation, but blessed with no terror or death so that we may in all innocence cherish the memory).

I certainly hope to live long enough to see more flights to the Moon, and I hope that a good few of the Apollo astronauts make it, too.

And I too treasure the photos I took from the TV! I was lucky enough to visit KSC in 1975 to see the last Apollo launch, and then I returned for STS-1, which sort of turned the circle. I hope to be at the Cape again for the last Shuttle, too...


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Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
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GregM
post May 23 2005, 02:41 AM
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QUOTE (garybeau @ May 21 2005, 04:19 PM)
What a great thread, you guys have an extraordinary memory for detail. I too was 13 in 1969 and watched and read everything I could get my hands on about the Apollo program. At one time or another I had read about most of these incidences, but completely forgot about them until now. I also had set up a camera and took pictures directly from the TV. I remember thinking at the time that this was a once in a lifetime event and that I had to somehow preserve this for the future. Who would have guessed that 36 years later you could get access to so much information with just the click of a button. There is far more material available with easy access today about the Apollo program than there was back then when it was happening.
But I still treasure those grainy photos I took off the TV because they bring me back to a very specific point in time.
Greg, I also have a couple of DVD sets from Spacecraft Films ("The Mighty Saturns" and "Apollo 15") and I agree with you they are well worth the money. There is a lot of footage there that I never saw before and the quality is superb.
But I do miss some of the commentary. I would like to find some footage of the
Apollo 11 landing exactly as it played out on TV with Walter Cronkite’s commentary.
If someone knows of a source where I could find that it would be greatly appreciated.


Gary
*



I understand where you are coming from here. The Spacecraft Films products are without a doubt the best existing visual records of the Gemini and Apollo flights - but they are of course from an Astronaut's/Mission Control point of view. The great advantage of this is of course that you get to see and hear the mission as it happened uninterrupted and unfiltered.

Of course it however cannot reproduce the flavor of the moment that each person experienced viewing the events through the looking glass of the media and popular culture - which of course was all most folks had access to at the time. That is something quite different. It is this experience, however filtered and presented by the television networks, that we have the memories of. I would think that if you are looking to rekindle that personal experience, you might try contacting the television networks about their video records of their presentations of the Apollo missions. Although the actual television downlink of the missions are of course public domain, the television network's presentation of them, and the accompanying commentary, would I think be network property. Walter Cronkite = CBS.
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edstrick
post May 23 2005, 05:09 AM
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Walter: "My GOD... The Building's Shaking....THE BUILDING'S SHAKING HERE!...."

That evening, they censored his report for the evening news. Took out his first two words after Saturn 501 lifted off!
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dvandorn
post May 23 2005, 06:29 AM
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QUOTE (edstrick @ May 23 2005, 12:09 AM)
Walter:  "My GOD... The Building's Shaking....THE BUILDING'S SHAKING HERE!...."

That evening, they censored his report for the evening news.  Took out his first two words after Saturn 501 lifted off!
*

I have never seen a man more completely enraptured than Walter Cronkite after his experience of holding the glass wall up to keep the acoustic pressure of the Saturn V from pushing it into his booth. I think his reaction to the physical *presence* of the mighty Saturn was even more profound than his speechlessness a couple of years later when men finally landed on the Moon.

-the other Doug


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