IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

21 Pages V   1 2 3 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Dust Storm
djellison
post Jun 5 2018, 03:05 PM
Post #1


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14114
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Expect a quiet few sols - http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/~lemmon/mars-tau-b.html
SOL TAU
5097 0.65
5098 0.64
5099 0.67
5100 0.64
5101 0.60
5102 0.60
5103 0.61
5104 1.55
5105 ****
5106 2.12

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 9 2018, 06:38 AM
Post #2


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 8127
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Breaking news: As Mars nears one of its closest perihelion passes, a large dust storm has developed. Per the press release, the storm now covers a surface area the size of North America. It may possibly grow into a global storm as has happened during previous close perihelion years (notably 1971, which coincided with Mariner 9's arrival).

Needless to say, this will produce highly challenging conditions for Oppy, and the mission team is making survival preparations. Science operations have been suspended at this time.

We wish the team the very best of luck, and GO OPPORTUNITY!!!!! wheel.gif wheel.gif wheel.gif


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sean
post Jun 9 2018, 11:17 AM
Post #3


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 709
Joined: 10-November 15
Member No.: 7837



Oh god.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
fredk
post Jun 9 2018, 02:17 PM
Post #4


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3850
Joined: 17-January 05
Member No.: 152



Some details of the storm activity at the MRO MARCI Weekly Weather Reports site. That's only updated weekly, on Wednesdays.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
James Sorenson
post Jun 9 2018, 06:44 PM
Post #5


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 631
Joined: 21-December 07
From: Clatskanie, Oregon
Member No.: 3988



Good luck to Opportunity and to the very talented team that has brought her through obstacle after obstacle after all these wonderful and fascinating years. She will prevail with the Sun gleaming off her dust-free camera lenses and solar cells after this passes. GO OPPY!! wheel.gif wheel.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Jun 9 2018, 07:18 PM
Post #6


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1565
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



Given the length of the mission, it was only a matter of time until another dust storm showed up; hopefully it won't be global or very long lasting!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
marsophile
post Jun 10 2018, 12:46 AM
Post #7


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 463
Joined: 10-September 08
Member No.: 4338



Once the dust storm per se abates, there may be a period while dust settles out of the atmosphere. I wonder if there might be some advantage at that point to positioning the rover on a slope so that it minimizes the catchment area that is presented to the falling dust. If this conflicts with maximizing the sun exposure of the solar panels, perhaps it could be done at night.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Jun 10 2018, 08:21 PM
Post #8


Martian Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7620
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



"I wonder if there might be some advantage at that point to positioning the rover on a slope"

The rover is already on about as steep a slope as it can easily manage. But pondering the geometry, to reduce the projected area of the panel to 50% you would need a slope of 60 degrees, completely impossible. The allowable slopes are only going to cut dust deposition by a small amount. We'll have to rely on wind gusts.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jun 10 2018, 09:03 PM
Post #9


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14114
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



When you have skies this dusty - the single best strategy is to be flat. You're getting your power from the diffuse glow of the whole sky.....anything other than flat hurts you.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
centsworth_II
post Jun 10 2018, 09:21 PM
Post #10


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2141
Joined: 28-December 04
From: Florida, USA
Member No.: 132



Also, with panels flat, a gust of wind from any direction will blow off dust.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jun 10 2018, 09:34 PM
Post #11


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14114
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Moreover - it's not dust 'fall' that hits the arrays - it's just blowing around and sometimes you get some. Tilting at a large angle may actually put your arrays facing upwind and cause more harm than good.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
pioneer
post Jun 10 2018, 10:07 PM
Post #12


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 127
Joined: 8-June 04
Member No.: 80



Will Opportunity get a chance to send back images from the surface during the dust storm?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jun 10 2018, 10:13 PM
Post #13


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14114
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



Other than taking occasional tau measurements of the sun - no - there simply is not enough power to do so.

If you look at the MER raw image page and PanCam tracking database - you'll see the only imaging attempted since Sol 2107 has been tau measurements of one sort or another.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ngunn
post Jun 10 2018, 10:29 PM
Post #14


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3449
Joined: 4-November 05
From: North Wales
Member No.: 542



I wonder how much tilt you need to shake some dust off by jiggling around a bit. Anything worth trying there?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
djellison
post Jun 10 2018, 10:38 PM
Post #15


Administrator
****

Group: Chairman
Posts: 14114
Joined: 8-February 04
Member No.: 1



The sort of slope that represents a threat to vehicle safety can cause some kinds of coarse dust, bordering on sand, to rattle down the rover deck.

This is all academic - we don't know how long this storm will last, nor what state the vehicle will be in when it ends. We may find we come out of it with hundreds of watt hour to burn.

Remember - dust on the arrays is not the problem right now. It's dust in the atmosphere. A brand new rover with clean arrays would also be in trouble right now. We went into this with a pretty clean rover. A dust factor of 0.772 ( see https://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/mission/statu...tml#opportunity ) is remarkably clean.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

21 Pages V   1 2 3 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 18th October 2018 - 05:25 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.