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Chandrayaan-II, All Chandrayaan-II related articles
Phil Stooke
post Feb 8 2021, 09:19 PM
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Hi, Ohsin. I can't see the images in this link - is it possible to post them directly here?

Phil


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Ohsin
post Feb 8 2021, 09:30 PM
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Attaching them as is.
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Phil Stooke
post Feb 9 2021, 01:35 AM
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Thank you! That is very useful. It enables this comparison with the post-impact LRO image from this site:

http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1131



Attached Image



This object is the one a bit south of the impact site identified in that LROC blog post, the object which left a visible trail on the surface as it rolled away from the crash. The new image is notable for its superb resolution and sharpness, and it seems to resolve the track as a string of pits as if the object was bouncing (or had a very irregular shape as it rolled).

How I would love to see pictures like this of every landing and impact site on the Moon!

Phil


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Shan
post Feb 9 2021, 02:41 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Feb 9 2021, 07:05 AM) *
Thank you! That is very useful. It enables this comparison with the post-impact LRO image from this site:

http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1131



Attached Image



This object is the one a bit south of the impact site identified in that LROC blog post, the object which left a visible trail on the surface as it rolled away from the crash. The new image is notable for its superb resolution and sharpness, and it seems to resolve the track as a string of pits as if the object was bouncing (or had a very irregular shape as it rolled).

How I would love to see pictures like this of every landing and impact site on the Moon!

Phil


Phil, that's one of the engines which got separated at the first contact point, you can see the exhaust plume much more visible in this one.. (Oct 2019 image) whereas the one posted on LRO is Nov 2019 image where the plume is not that much visible due to lighting conditions..

Not sure what exactly happened during last few minutes of Vikram's landing, my view is the central engine would have got separated..only if the Vikram lander's telemetry is intact it can answer it for itself..


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threadworm
post Mar 18 2021, 07:01 AM
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Has anyone had any success with Chandrayaan-2's orthographic/DTM combination, in terms of 3D imagery?

I've produced 3D models in the past with other missions with QGIS, but the 3D plugin just doesn't want to play. I've also had a go with Blender, but I'm not experienced with it so may not be doing it right!
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threadworm
post Mar 20 2021, 10:30 AM
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Managed to answer my own question, partially at least.

For reasons best known to itself the DTM file was ridiculously exaggerating the vertical extent of the model. I found that my changing the vertical exaggeration in the Qgis2threejs plugin to somewhere around 0.00004 gave sensible results. There is a 'nodata' value of -32768, and I wonder if it's reading that in?

The resulting model looks a little 'lumpy', at least in this representation of part of Hadley Rille, and I'm not sure if that's a feature of the DTM itself or the processing its had to go through to get it presentable.


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Shan
post Mar 22 2021, 03:57 AM
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QUOTE (threadworm @ Mar 20 2021, 04:00 PM) *
Managed to answer my own question, partially at least.

For reasons best known to itself the DTM file was ridiculously exaggerating the vertical extent of the model. I found that my changing the vertical exaggeration in the Qgis2threejs plugin to somewhere around 0.00004 gave sensible results. There is a 'nodata' value of -32768, and I wonder if it's reading that in?

The resulting model looks a little 'lumpy', at least in this representation of part of Hadley Rille, and I'm not sure if that's a feature of the DTM itself or the processing its had to go through to get it presentable.


Attached Image


It seems they had some calibration issues with some instruments onboard..(OHRC was not calibrated first properly which gave blurry images but the images from Feb2020 were good).. I believe that's the case here also..Only ISRO can answer on that..
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threadworm
post Mar 23 2021, 05:00 PM
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I've been through all of the Orthographic/DTM combinations and produced a (very) rough guide as to what's covered in what they've released so far. I've also compiled a spreadsheet showing the latitude/longitude if anyone wants that. It doesn't hit many things of interest, though it does cover the Apollo 17 SIV-B impact site and also Luna 21.

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threadworm
post Mar 30 2021, 07:34 PM
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Apollo 14's lunar module in the calibrated TCM images ch2_tmc_nca_20200207T0122596445_d_img_m65 and ch2_tmc_ncf_20200207T0122596445_d_img_m65. The astronaut trails westward towards the ALSEP are clear, and those heading out and back from Cone crater can just be made out.
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Ohsin
post Jul 17 2021, 06:21 AM
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Few more OHRC images have been released.

https://pradan.issdc.gov.in/pradan/
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threadworm
post Jul 28 2021, 09:47 PM
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Ranger 9's impact point, from file ch2_tmc_nrf_20200107T1218554551_d_img_d18.

Working my way (slowy) through the TMC images they've added, so far they are frustratingly close to, but just missing, Apollo sites (other than the Apollo 14 one I posted earlier).

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Phil Stooke
post Jul 29 2021, 12:32 AM
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Hi Threadworm. That image doesn't seem to match the pattern of craters around the Ranger 9 impact site. I have attached an LRO NAC image of the Ranger 9 crater (confirmed by comparing the Ranger 9 images taken just before impact). The two bright-rimmed craters and other bright dots in your image should be visible but are not. If you post a wider context image we may be able to see where your feature is.

Phil


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threadworm
post Jul 29 2021, 08:52 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Jul 29 2021, 01:32 AM) *
Hi Threadworm. That image doesn't seem to match the pattern of craters around the Ranger 9 impact site. I have attached an LRO NAC image of the Ranger 9 crater (confirmed by comparing the Ranger 9 images taken just before impact). The two bright-rimmed craters and other bright dots in your image should be visible but are not. If you post a wider context image we may be able to see where your feature is.

Phil


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Apologies. I got carried away - that should have read Ranger 8!
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Phil Stooke
post Jul 29 2021, 05:44 PM
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That works! Here is a version with much of the stripe pattern removed. It would be nice to see this imaged by the high resolution camera.

Phil

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Ohsin
post Sep 3 2021, 06:32 PM
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In a virtual talk held today, Director of Space Applications Centre, ISRO showed an OHRC image of Apollo 11 landing site.

https://youtu.be/T8oV-Kx26no?t=3610

We were notified by u/Harshdeep_2021 on Reddit.
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