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Rosetta - Early Orbital Operations at Comet 67P C-G, August 6, 2014 - November 13, 2014
MarsInMyLifetime
post Sep 10 2014, 09:18 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Sep 10 2014, 01:02 PM) *
There is fuzziness elsewhere in that image which might be just glare, but this is right over the neck area, so I think this is jets.

Phil

Because several images were merged for admittedly pictorial impact, the data's integrity for interpretation is iffy to me. But man, what a pretty selfie!


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ngunn
post Sep 10 2014, 10:00 PM
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These recent views, unlike earlier ones, are looking into the light. From this angle the jets should be more prominent relative to the cometary surface, similar to what we have seen in Cassini's images of Enceladus. So my bet is on Phil: that image does show the jets.
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MarsInMyLifetime
post Sep 11 2014, 04:49 AM
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The latest ESA mosaic has a phenomenon that might be useful going forward: each adjacent pair happens to have enough overlap to yield a nice cross-eyed view of that section of landscape. In these views that I cropped and lined up (generally Sun coming from top or left for ease of visual sensemaking), the elevations of the platforms and furrows become much more clear, at least to me. Hoping this happenstance of the mosaic overlap is of use to somebody. In clockwise order:


Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image


Edit: A tap or two of Ctrl+ helps to get the scale up to where stereo merging is easier.


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Malmer
post Sep 11 2014, 08:51 AM
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QUOTE (MarsInMyLifetime @ Sep 11 2014, 06:49 AM) *
The latest ESA mosaic has a phenomenon that might be useful going forward: each adjacent pair happens to have enough overlap to yield a nice cross-eyed view of that section of landscape. In these views that I cropped and lined up (generally Sun coming from top or left for ease of visual sensemaking), the elevations of the platforms and furrows become much more clear, at least to me. Hoping this happenstance of the mosaic overlap is of use to somebody. In clockwise order:

"edit removed images"

Edit: A tap or two of Ctrl+ helps to get the scale up to where stereo merging is easier.


Yes those mini stereo strips are really cool. It is a nice little extra perk. I eill try to make little mini 3D dem:s out of them. They make it easier to understand just how rough and hostie the surface really is. But I'm hoping that we get another osiris stereo pair at some point.
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marsbug
post Sep 11 2014, 10:11 AM
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QUOTE (MarsInMyLifetime @ Sep 11 2014, 05:49 AM) *
The latest ESA mosaic has a phenomenon that might be useful going forward: each adjacent pair happens to have enough overlap to yield a nice cross-eyed view of that section of landscape. In these views that I cropped and lined up (generally Sun coming from top or left for ease of visual sensemaking), the elevations of the platforms and furrows become much more clear, at least to me. Hoping this happenstance of the mosaic overlap is of use to somebody. In clockwise order:


Attached Image

Edit: A tap or two of Ctrl+ helps to get the scale up to where stereo merging is easier.


Thanks MarsInMyLifetime! Looking at the steep sided, flat topped, mound just to the lower right of the center of the image I've left in the quote... can anyone say if the bright top the result of a lighter deposit, or angle wrt the Sun?


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vikingmars
post Sep 11 2014, 11:31 AM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Sep 10 2014, 08:02 PM) *
There is fuzziness elsewhere in that image which might be just glare, but this is right over the neck area, so I think this is jets. Phil

Totally agree with you, Phil.
They are jets indeed, because they are oriented towards the Sun.
I made my own processing yesterday of the nucleus for some friends in France, haven't seen your post, and I obtained the same results...
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MarsInMyLifetime
post Sep 11 2014, 01:09 PM
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QUOTE (marsbug @ Sep 11 2014, 05:11 AM) *
Thanks MarsInMyLifetime! Looking at the steep sided, flat topped, mound just to the lower right of the center of the image I've left in the quote... can anyone say if the bright top the result of a lighter deposit, or angle wrt the Sun?

That feature was exactly what got me to investigating the possible stereo effect. The shadow shows that it is projecting a rounded top onto the terrain, so it is definitely not at surface level (just a bright spot) or flat topped. It is boulder-like, unlike the rampart structures which are generally quite a bit larger. I'm looking forward to explanations why it and the series of smaller bright objects above it are not draped in the same dark stuff that covers the rest of the landscape.

The pan in the middle left has some interesting furrow features that look like fingers reaching into the circle. I'm starting to see these furrows/tubes in many places now. They may have something to do with the transport of volatiles to the surface (and then end up exposed as fossil features once their former substrate sublimates away).


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marsbug
post Sep 11 2014, 01:44 PM
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I'm glad to hear you say that, I was thinking I was imagining things - there are linear features, and even sets of narrowly spaced parallel furrows, in the images I've seen. My guess would be gas transport to, but who knows (yet)? Fascinating!


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Harder
post Sep 11 2014, 08:01 PM
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The science editor of a reputable Dutch newspaper reported today that the Philea landing site selection process is becoming tense, as the sheer roughness of the 67P surface is becoming increasingly evident at the candidate landing sites. There are flatter (less rough) areas on 67P but these are unfavorable for the required amount of sunlight for Philea. What will the landing team decide? I can’t wait to hear their decision and rationale on Monday!
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atomoid
post Sep 11 2014, 10:48 PM
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(below left) interesting bright circular patch at top right in sept 10 release.
Nice resolution in this release, also nice is the subtle illumination of the dark inner-facing 'side' between the two lobes.
the same area is covered on sept 1 aug 16 aug 8 aug 3, but the aug 7 release has it (below right), seems theres nothing there, perhaps a sort of camera artifact?
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vikingmars
post Sep 12 2014, 09:24 AM
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Here is the spectacular image taken by Rosetta's NavCam on September 10, showing the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, and fully cleaned and processed to show you its backlighted shape. The night side of the front lobe is now seen thanks to the sunlight coming from the other lobe... Enjoy ! smile.gif
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neo56
post Sep 12 2014, 04:57 PM
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Really impressive image Olivier !


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polaris
post Sep 12 2014, 05:42 PM
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Impressionnant, Olivier !
La présentation pour La Villette avance ?
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SpaceListener
post Sep 12 2014, 08:23 PM
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Recent update from ESA Where Will Rosetta's Philae's Lander land on comet 67P/churyumov-Gerasimenko?
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Explorer1
post Sep 13 2014, 04:30 PM
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No matter what happens on touchdown, there will be loads of science data from Philae: quite the checklist, including a 'farewell' image from CIVA of the deployment!
Looks like the surface temperature is the main limit on lander lifetime as perihelion approaches.
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