IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

3 Pages V  < 1 2 3  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Europa Subsurface Ocean
Bob Shaw
post Jan 27 2006, 06:54 PM
Post #31


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2488
Joined: 17-April 05
From: Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Member No.: 239



QUOTE (Jeff7 @ Jan 27 2006, 02:57 AM)
Link was truncated.wink.gif

There we go

I wonder if there are any plans to gather samples from those lakes?
*


Jeff:

It's been discussed, but would be very difficult to do without contaminating the lakes themselves. Even getting *near* the fluid water is hazardous, sadly (for the lakes). It may, however, be too late anyway, as drilling close by may already have penetrated the 'no go' zone required for a sterile investigation.

Bob Shaw


--------------------
Remember: Time Flies like the wind - but Fruit Flies like bananas!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Feb 8 2006, 12:51 PM
Post #32


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



Newly Discovered Antarctic Lakes

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/...p3?img_id=17176

To quote:

"Scientists recently published the first thorough description of the size, depth, and origin of these two large lakes, called 90° East Lake (for its longitude) and Sovetskaya Lake (for the Russian research station that was unknowingly built over top it many years ago)."

Now I truly wonder how pristine at least the latter lake is.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Feb 17 2006, 04:23 PM
Post #33


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



Special Public Event

Europa: Life Beneath the Ice?

What lies beneath the ice of Jupiter’s frozen moon Europa?

Almost certainly, a liquid water ocean.

Could life have evolved in such an icebound sea, growing in the darkness of eternal winter?

Europa is one of the solar system’s most fascinating worlds, having the precious commodity of liquid water, fascinating geology, and even the possibility of life. Numerous science committees have judged it as the top priority for outer solar system exploration. Join the NASA Astrobiology Institute Europa Focus Group and The Planetary Society for an eye-opening presentation about Europa, how life can evolve in unexpected places, and the type of mission that might be sent to answer some of our questions. Steven Quale will show clips from the film, Aliens of the Deep. Time for Q&A with the speakers will follow the presentation.

Admission is Free.

Seating is limited. First come, first served.

SPEAKERS:

Chris McKay, NASA Ames, Planetary Scientist
Torrence Johnson, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Galileo Project Scientist
Bob Pappalardo, University of Colorado, Boulder, Planetary Scientist
Steven Quale, filmmaker and co-Director of Aliens of the Deep
Bruce Betts, Moderator, The Planetary Society, Director of Projects

Date: Sunday, February 26, 2006
Time: 7:00 – 9:00 PM

Location: NASA Ames Research Center
Building 943, Eagle Room
Moffett Field, CA
Directions: Exit off Hwy 101

This event is presented by The Planetary Societyin affiliation with The NASA Astrobiology Institute Europa Focus Group.

If you need additional information, please contact The Planetary Society, 626-793-5100

http://www.planetary.org/programs/projects...ropa_event.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Feb 23 2006, 03:55 PM
Post #34


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



THE PITS

- Deep Ocean Mining In Prospect

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Deep_Oce...n_Prospect.html

St Louis MO (SPX) Feb 19, 2006 - A Canadian geologist predicts the world is on
the brink of a new era of deep-ocean mining of mineral deposits. Steven Scott,
with the University of Toronto, said advances in marine geology and deep-ocean
technology have combined to make possible going more than two kilometers (about
6,000 feet) underwater for gold and other minerals, and two start-up
marine-mining companies - Nautilus Minerals and Neptune Minerals - are actively
exploring deep seafloor deposits.

-----------
WATER WORLD

- Scientists Urge Responsible Deep Sea Vent Research

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Scientis...t_Research.html

St Louis MO (SPX) Feb 19, 2006 - Ocean scientists have asked the international
community to develop responsible research guidelines for deep sea vents, which
are among the world's most extreme ecosystems, but which are being studied more
frequently and could be damaged by human activities.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Mar 6 2006, 09:38 PM
Post #35





Guests






Today's Planetary Radio podcast (Europa: Life Beneath the Ice?) is featuring an interview with Torrence Johnson, Chris McKay, and Bob Pappalardo.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Apr 4 2006, 08:17 PM
Post #36


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



Title: Exploring Europa's Ocean: A Challenge for Marine Technology of this Century

Authors: Carsey, F.
Chen, G.
Cutts, J.
French, L.
Kern, R.
Lane, A.
Stolorz, P.
Zimmerman, W.
Ballou, P.

Issue Date: 2000

Citation: Marine Technology Society Journal
Washington D.C., USA

Abstract: The Galileo spacecraft has sent back tantalizing image data hinting at a vast ocean beneath a thick ice crust on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons which is about the size of our moon.

URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2014/13849

http://trs-new.jpl.nasa.gov/dspace/handle/2014/13849


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Apr 20 2006, 11:19 AM
Post #37


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



ERS-2 helps detect massive rivers under Antarctica

British scientists have discovered rivers the size of the Thames in London
flowing hundreds of miles under the Antarctica ice shelf by examining small
changes in elevation, observed by ESA’s ERS-2 satellite, in the surface of the
oldest, thickest ice in the region, according to an article published in Nature
this week.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMA94OFGLE_planet_0.html


ICE WORLD

- Antarctic Subglacial Rivers Are Found

http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Antarcti..._Are_Found.html

London (UPI) Apr 20, 2006 - British scientists say plans are to drill beneath
the frozen wastes of the Antarctic, to investigate subglacial lakes, are being
reviewed.


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_Richard Trigaux_*
post Apr 20 2006, 08:09 PM
Post #38





Guests






What is incredible is that, seemingly, it is the geothermal flux which makes all this ice melt. This geothermal flux seems something weak at human scale, but at the scale of a continent, it is enough to feed a large river of melting ice.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
scalbers
post Jun 14 2019, 07:35 PM
Post #39


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1349
Joined: 5-March 05
From: Boulder, CO
Member No.: 184



As good a thread as any to post this new paper about surface sodium chloride on Europa implying this also exists in the ocean. The visiible wavelength yellowish color on parts of the surface is examined spectroscopically, and is distinct from other areas having more of a brownish color.

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/6/eaaw7123


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 14 2019, 08:16 PM
Post #40


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 8382
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Reminder to all that this is an older thread (ca. 2006), and rule 1.3 applies (last modified 2012).


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

3 Pages V  < 1 2 3
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st August 2019 - 05:25 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.