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India's Mars probe (MOM), Development, launch, and cruise to Mars
mcaplinger
post Oct 1 2012, 02:50 PM
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QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Sep 30 2012, 10:43 PM) *
To be fair, the Moon's is a much more challenging thermal environment than Mars'. I think.

That's certainly true. We ended up using every trick in the book to get LROC to perform in a low lunar orbit.


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gndonald
post Jan 4 2013, 11:43 PM
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Emily has posted an update on this one, the instruments have been selected and they hope to have them ready for March. I'm going to wish the Indians as much luck as they need for this mission. I'll be happy to see them get the probe onto a Earth - Mars trajectory.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakda...ars-update.html

In regards the launch profile, I can remember reading somewhere that for countries like India & China that initial 22,000 km orbit is easier to reach because their launch vehicles are optimised for putting communications satellites into that orbit.
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Paolo
post Jan 5 2013, 09:32 AM
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there was a very short story in Science yesterday (for those having access it's here
just one sentence to retain:

QUOTE
the Indian Space Research Organisation notes that the tiny satellite is "more of a technological mission than a science mission."


there is also a detailed list of instruments on NASAspaceflight forum
note that the Indian methane detector is said to be

QUOTE
designed to measure methane in the Martian atmosphere with ppb accuracy


i think this is about the same capability as the spectrometer on Mars Express. TGO, IIRC should go for part-per-trillion accuracy
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machi
post Jan 5 2013, 11:14 AM
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Here is source with short article about electro-optical payload of the Indian Mars mission.
You can find that article quickly by using ctrl+f and simply find "MCC".

Mars Colour Camera is refractor design and it has resolution 25 m/pix (50 microrad) from distance 500 km
It has 2K2K CCD with RGB Bayer filter for visible light between 0.4 to 0.7 microns.
Frame size is 5050 km from perigee and 8,0008,000 km from apogee.

Methane Sensor for Mars (MSM) is Fabry-Perot interferometer with ppb detection limit for methane. It works in narrow SWIR window (1642-1658 nm).

Thermal Infra-Red Imaging Specrometer (TIS) is grating spectrometer with uncooled microbolometer array for TIR between 7 to 14 microns.




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tolis
post Jan 5 2013, 12:19 PM
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The high apocentre makes it - in principle - capable of flying by Deimos.
Neither MEX nor the other orbiters currently operating around Mars
can approach that moon.
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Cosmic Penguin
post Feb 26 2013, 07:05 AM
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A paper on the mission to be presented on the 44th LPSC: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2013/pdf/2760.pdf

Edit: Another poster about the spacecraft seen at the Aero India 2013 Expo:

Attached Image


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UMSF - the place of Opportunity to satisfy your Spirit of Curiosity
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SFJCody
post Feb 27 2013, 05:09 AM
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I notice that this is scheduled to arrive at Mars a month before C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) which has a current nominal flyby distance of 100,000 km (likely to change significantly as the arc length increases). I wonder whether it would be possible to engineer some sort of flyby following orbit insertion? I imagine this is either impossible or would require the expenditure of much more propellant than ISRO would be prepared to sacrifice.
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Explorer1
post Feb 27 2013, 05:45 AM
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Way too many factors to consider right now. If anything, MAVEN be the most suited to getting a whiff of the tail, given its instruments being specialized for rarefied gases. Would instrument commissioning even been done for either spacecraft that soon after arrival?
And of course, it's really up to the comet to decide where to pass and how much volatiles to emit...
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Cosmic Penguin
post Apr 2 2013, 01:17 PM
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Updates from Emily: ISRO's Mars mission now undergoing assembly and testing; NASA, ISRO agree to future space science cooperation smile.gif


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jsheff
post Jul 9 2013, 01:14 AM
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The latest on this mission:

Indian Mars Mission news:

John Sheff
Cambridge, MA
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Paolo
post Jul 24 2013, 05:02 PM
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almost everything you wanted to know about MOM http://rd.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007...22-1521-9_5.pdf
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Explorer1
post Jul 24 2013, 05:19 PM
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Looks like there's a concern about Siding Spring's tail interfering with methane measurements; their instrument could confuse cometary material with Mars-originating emissions. Given how quickly methane is destroyed by the sun, would it really be much of a problem, even if some ended up in the atmosphere?
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Doug M.
post Jul 29 2013, 09:14 PM
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Emily Lakdawalla has another post up on this. Key grafs:

QUOTE
Meanwhile, in India, the Deccan Herald reports that the integration of the Mars Orbiter Mission's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) has begun. At the same time, payload integration is proceeding: all five science instruments are now with the spacecraft in Bangalore. The completed spacecraft will be delivered to India's launch facility in Sriharikota in mid-August for its November launch. That seems like a mighty short time for payload integration. On the other hand, the payload isn't really the point on this mission; India's first deep space operations is the point...

The original plan had been to launch the Mars mission on India's next-generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV), but delays and one launch disaster have meant that the GSLV has still not yet had a successful flight. India had to choose between delaying to 2016 or launching on the much smaller PSLV. The PSLV cannot send a spacecraft directly on an interplanetary trajectory; it will launch a downsized Mars Orbiter Mission, carrying a 15-kilogram science payload, into Earth orbit, and an upper stage will widen the spacecraft's orbit through multiple boosts into ever-larger ellipses until finally injecting it toward Mars a month later. Once at Mars, the same procedure will operate in reverse, but mass limitations will prevent the spacecraft from carrying enough fuel to bring it down into a low orbit. Instead, it will be in an elliptical orbit with a distant periapsis.


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Doug M.
post Jul 29 2013, 09:18 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Jul 24 2013, 07:02 PM) *
almost everything you wanted to know about MOM http://rd.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007...22-1521-9_5.pdf


Almost everything... doesn't have anything to say about the Mars orbit. We know from other sources that it will be a polar orbit with a very high apoapsis.

It does mention that a lot of components are being reused from Chandrayaan, as people had already guessed. Also that nominal mission would be six months from arrival in Mars orbit.


Doug M.
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elakdawalla
post Jul 29 2013, 11:36 PM
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Doug, it's been pointed out to me that I made some errors in the paragraph about the GSLV; I've edited my original post slightly. Sorry about that. (GSLV has had successful flights, though not many; recent failure had to do with a cryogenic upper stage).

This article says that orbit altitude will vary from 385 to 80,000 km, FWIW. That apoapsis is roughly 4 times farther from Mars' center than Deimos' orbit.


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