IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

7 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
India's Mars probe (MOM), Development, launch, and cruise to Mars
Doug M.
post Jul 30 2013, 11:49 AM
Post #31


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 93
Joined: 8-August 12
Member No.: 6511



QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Jul 30 2013, 01:36 AM) *
Doug, it's been pointed out to me that I made some errors in the paragraph about the GSLV; I've edited my original post slightly. Sorry about that. (GSLV has had successful flights, though not many; recent failure had to do with a cryogenic upper stage).

This article says that orbit altitude will vary from 385 to 80,000 km, FWIW. That apoapsis is roughly 4 times farther from Mars' center than Deimos' orbit.



Okay! Thanks, Emily.

In theory, Mangalyaan could come fairly close to Deimos. In practice, hoot, who knows. I would imagine that if they arrive in Mars orbit with a little bit of fuel left to play with, a Deimos flyby would at least be discussed.

The gentleman in the article is upset because Mangalyaan is turning out to be more of a technological proof-of-concept than an actual scientific mission. And I can see the force of that. On the other hand, there's precedent; Pathfinder and Sojourner were test beds for lander and rover technology. (As it turned out, they ended up performing much better than expected and delivered some respectable science.)


Doug M.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bobik
post Nov 2 2013, 08:48 AM
Post #32


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 72
Joined: 28-October 12
Member No.: 6732



MOM Martian orbit parameters:

MOI Epoch: 24-09-2014, 02:34
Periapsis: 365.3 km
Apoapsis: 80000 km
Inclination: 150.0°
AOP: 203.5°
RAAN: 61.4°
Period: 76.72 hr
Sun Elevation: 6.8°

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c25/pdf/pslv-c25-brochure.pdf

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
bobik
post Nov 4 2013, 10:50 AM
Post #33


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 72
Joined: 28-October 12
Member No.: 6732



It seems that the Thermal Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (TIS) has a spectral range of 7-14 μm and a spectral resolution of 580 nm (THEMIS: 6.8-14.9 μm and ~1 μm, respectively). Bhatt et al., 2013
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Nov 4 2013, 02:40 PM
Post #34


Martian Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 7170
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



From the Deccan Herald today:

"“We hope to observe Phobos, but not the other one, Diemos, as it is too tiny,” V Adimurthy, senior adviser of interplanetary missions at Isro, told Deccan Herald."

Too bad - Phobos is very well imaged already, Deimos is poorly covered by images especially at high resolution. We really need to see more of it. Even the shape model is very uncertain on the trailing side. China's ill-fated orbiter launched with Phobos-Grunt was going to look at it (I was told personally by a person involved with it). Maybe we will have to wait for the next Chinese orbiter suggested to fly in 2018.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Nov 5 2013, 02:28 AM
Post #35


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1413
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



Is there a link to the webcast? It's t-7 hours, and the facebook page mentions there will be one, but the ISRO site just shows an old link...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Nov 5 2013, 03:29 AM
Post #36


Administrator
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 5027
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



The website says the webcast will begin at 14:00 IST, which is to say, not for roughly 5 hours.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Nov 5 2013, 03:35 AM
Post #37


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1413
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



I see it now; thanks. Now to wait.
Amazing that a Mars probe can go from first announcement to launch day in only three pages on this of all forums! (not a criticism of anyone, just noting a consequence of the lack of info until the past few weeks)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elakdawalla
post Nov 5 2013, 03:39 AM
Post #38


Administrator
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 5027
Joined: 4-August 05
From: Pasadena, CA, USA, Earth
Member No.: 454



Yeah. I do have to say that they're making up for lost time with their Facebook page. Lots of info and high-resolution photos.


--------------------
My blog - @elakdawalla on Twitter - Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Nov 5 2013, 08:30 AM
Post #39


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1413
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



Spaceflightnow has the stream starting.
Definitely a different vibe on the preshow from NASA press conferences wink.gif

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jamescanvin
post Nov 5 2013, 09:07 AM
Post #40


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2249
Joined: 9-February 04
From: UK
Member No.: 16



FYI. I'm finding the mobile video stream from spaceflightnow much more reliable than the desktop feed which was very glitchy for me.

2 mins ...


--------------------
My MER & MSL Imagery site - Martian Vistas ---- Twitter Feed (including sol by sol updates on Opportunity's activity)
Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post Nov 5 2013, 09:10 AM
Post #41


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1413
Joined: 13-February 10
From: British Columbia
Member No.: 5221



Liftoff!

And coasting...
Hope to see good news tomorrow morning.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Astro0
post Nov 5 2013, 09:10 AM
Post #42


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 3108
Joined: 21-December 05
From: Canberra, Australia
Member No.: 615



Launch!

Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post Nov 5 2013, 09:48 AM
Post #43


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1881
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



So far so good. The liquid fueled fourth stage has ignited. Hopefully everything works...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Nov 5 2013, 12:38 PM
Post #44


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 7947
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Successfully made initial parking orbit, looking good thus far.


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Doug M.
post Nov 6 2013, 08:55 AM
Post #45


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 93
Joined: 8-August 12
Member No.: 6511



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Nov 5 2013, 05:35 AM) *
I see it now; thanks. Now to wait.
Amazing that a Mars probe can go from first announcement to launch day in only three pages on this of all forums! (not a criticism of anyone, just noting a consequence of the lack of info until the past few weeks)


It hasn't attracted a lot of attention in mainstream media, either. I'd say this is one part India having been rather tight-lipped (reasonable, given that it's their first effort and fingers are crossed) and two parts it not fitting any convenient narrative. India launched a Mars probe... wait, India? Huh?

(Prediction: if China's Moon landing succeeds next month, we will see much, much more media coverage. Because that's going to fit a couple of different narratives really well.)



Doug M.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

7 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th June 2017 - 03:27 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.