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Chandrayaan-II, All Chandrayaan-II related articles
Roby72
post Aug 13 2019, 11:26 PM
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Success for Lunar Tranfer Trajectory:

https://www.isro.gov.in/update/14-aug-2019/...sfer-trajectory

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nogal
post Aug 14 2019, 12:07 AM
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Here is an updated table with the latest information.

Fernando
Attached Image

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Phil Stooke
post Aug 20 2019, 05:23 AM
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https://www.isro.gov.in/update/20-aug-2019/...orbit-insertion

Lunar orbit!

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Aug 22 2019, 10:30 PM
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https://www.isro.gov.in/sites/default/files...moon_photo1.png

First image of the Moon, with the Orientale basin at the top and north at upper left.

Phil


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Steve G
post Aug 23 2019, 09:16 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Aug 22 2019, 02:30 PM) *
https://www.isro.gov.in/sites/default/files...moon_photo1.png

First image of the Moon, with the Orientale basin at the top and north at upper left.

Phil

That's an amazing picture. Our moon is so wonderfully diverse and interesting. I can never get bored gazing at its majesty.
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John Moore
post Sep 1 2019, 04:05 PM
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Well, looks like all went well on the fifth manoeuvre, 1 Sept, 2019, and also an update, 2 Sept, 2019, on the successful separation of the Vikram Lander (with the Pragyan rover onboard) from the orbiter.

Below image (Credit: ISRO): a tentative plan over the next few days up to the 7 Sept, 2019...when India's engineers' nerves will undoubtedly be fraying towards a successful landing.

John

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charborob
post Sep 4 2019, 01:41 AM
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The Vikram lander has reached its final orbit (35 x 101 km) before its descent to the Lunar surface (scheduled for Sept. 7).
https://www.isro.gov.in/chandrayaan2-latest-updates
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 4 2019, 08:49 PM
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The sun is about to rise on the landing site, and the high resolution camera on the orbiter is supposed to image the site for final site planning. The resolution will be about 30 cm/pixel, better than a standard 50 cm/pixel LROC NAC image and almost as good as the low altitude images (25 cm/pixel) NAC obtained over several of the Apollo sites. It will be great to see the site before and after landing with this camera, and really nice to see images of other sites with the same camera if they are taken. For instance, LRO images of the Chang'e 4 site are about 1 m/pixel, so this camera might give us 3x better resolution. I hope the camera team plan images of other sites at that resolution.

Phil


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John Moore
post Sep 5 2019, 07:00 PM
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Below, an approximate render of the lighting conditions of the 6 Sept, 2019 (round 6.00 pm UTC )…for successful landing of Vikram. Simpelius N and Manzinus C, lie roughly at the centre of the ellipse.

John

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SpaceListener
post Sep 6 2019, 08:11 PM
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At this moment, Vikram will start the descending trajectory shortly.
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Seryddwr
post Sep 6 2019, 08:25 PM
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Live feeds not looking good; it seems the lander deviated from its trajectory in the final moments of the descent a few minutes ago. No downlink unsure.gif
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SpaceListener
post Sep 6 2019, 08:28 PM
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A steeper inclination than the planned trajectory indicates some failure propulsion along without a downlink signal. I am afraid that Vikram has not landed as planned, softly. The last info from the panel was that its altitude was 1 km above the surface at 59 m/s (an acceptable landing speed must not be greater than 15 m/s). The people from the operation center are uneasy trying to figure out this incident.
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Seryddwr
post Sep 6 2019, 08:39 PM
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Rough luck, that. Space is hard! Hope ISRO can swiftly recover from this failure.
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Seryddwr
post Sep 6 2019, 08:48 PM
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India Today's live feed reporting that all was well up to an altitude of 2.1 kilometres. Communication was lost after that. Sounds like the issue was to do with the 'fine braking' phase - a misfiring or failed engine, perhaps?
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nprev
post Sep 6 2019, 09:02 PM
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Aaaaaaah....damn. sad.gif

My most sincere sympathies to the Chandrayaan II team. There is absolutely nothing easy nor routine about landing on another world. This was a truly brilliant & ambitious effort, and though lessons learned are always painful they are always invaluable as the only real way forward to new futures.


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A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
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