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LRO-LCROSS - Orbit Insertion / Flyby Coverage
Lewis007
post Jun 29 2009, 07:22 AM
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Following the initial LOI burn of LRO on June 23, an additional four burns have been made, to put the probe into the so-called commissioning orbit. I prepared an overview of these burns below; the info comes from the http://lroupdate.blogspot.com/ website.

burn / date / time (EDT) / duration / (polar) orbit
LOI-2 / 24-06-2009 / 06:56 / 12 min / 200 x 1680 km
LOI-3 / 25-06-2009 / 06:32 / 12 min / 199 x 740 km
LOI-4 / 26-06-2009 / 08:25 / 10 min / 200 x 200 km
LOI-5 / 27-06-2009 / 08:34 / 4 min / 31 x 199 km

About a week and half after reaching the commissioning orbit, the process starts of activating the remaining instruments and start calibrating them.
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climber
post Jun 30 2009, 09:34 PM
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LCROSS spoted with an amateur telescope: http://www.backyardastronomer.com/lcross/L...90629-anim2.gif


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zeBeamer
post Jul 1 2009, 03:03 AM
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This morning, the LOLA instrument was turned on (not the lasers, just the receptors), and began collecting Laser Ranging data later in the afternoon !
Those data are not exactly like SLR (Satellite Laser Ranging), because it is not a two-way link, but they are timetagged at both the transmitting end (the Goddard station) and the receiving end (the LOLA receptor #1, through a fiber optics between a small telescope attached to the Earth-pointing high-gain antenna and the Moon-pointing LOLA instrument). They give an absolute range betwen the Earth and LRO (after some careful correlation and calibration), which will help improve the position knowledge of the spacecraft and benefit all the instruments (especially LROC, which turned on today for a bit!)

(see the LRO blog)
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JRA
post Aug 10 2009, 03:06 AM
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Does anyone have any news as to when the LRO will move into it's mission orbit? I assume it depends on how all the instruments are checking out, and as far as I've read, everything seems to have been working great so far. I've read in the press kit that the commissioning orbit could last up to 60 days, but I figured it could turn out to be less then that if everything is going well.
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jmknapp
post Aug 10 2009, 08:25 PM
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QUOTE (JRA @ Aug 9 2009, 10:06 PM) *
Does anyone have any news as to when the LRO will move into it's mission orbit? I assume it depends on how all the instruments are checking out, and as far as I've read, everything seems to have been working great so far. I've read in the press kit that the commissioning orbit could last up to 60 days, but I figured it could turn out to be less then that if everything is going well.


FWIW, according to the trajectory files at http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/downloads.html (LRO_Mission_Baseline_Ephemeris_v10), they should already be in a 53x48 km orbit today (Aug. 10). Not a tweet on that score at http://twitter.com/lro_NASA though.


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JRA
post Aug 12 2009, 11:52 PM
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QUOTE (jmknapp @ Aug 10 2009, 12:25 PM) *
FWIW, according to the trajectory files at http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/downloads.html (LRO_Mission_Baseline_Ephemeris_v10), they should already be in a 53x48 km orbit today (Aug. 10). Not a tweet on that score at http://twitter.com/lro_NASA though.


Thank you for the info and the links. And I just saw this today on the LRO twitter. "Orbit #583 around the Moon! Still humming along in my commissioning orbit, on track for Mission Orbit Insertion end of August! :-)"
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2amazing
post Sep 14 2009, 04:42 PM
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Orbit #988 about the Moon!! Final instrument calibrations as my team prepares for my Mission Orbit Insertion (MOI) burn tomorrow.
http://twitter.com/LRO_NASA
14-sept-09
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Guest_Zvezdichko_*
post Sep 15 2009, 08:37 PM
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Guests






http://lroupdate.blogspot.com/

LRO now in its final orbit!
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elakdawalla
post Sep 15 2009, 08:53 PM
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Zvedichko, do you do anything but sit in front of your computer hitting "refresh" on your browser? smile.gif Thanks for this and all your other tips.


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Guest_Zvezdichko_*
post Sep 15 2009, 09:01 PM
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Guests






I'll take this as a compliment smile.gif Yes of course, I had a dinner just an hour ago tongue.gif . And I'm preparing to travel to the capital tomorrow so I won't be able to follow the press-conference on Thursday.

I had a lot of work today in front of my monitor, because I'm following the progress of Phobos-Grunt and there are interesting publications in the ru-net. That's why I also had the chance to check LRO's websites.
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Phil Stooke
post Sep 15 2009, 10:13 PM
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Your contributions are very useful!

Phil


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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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2amazing
post Sep 16 2009, 07:54 PM
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With this the tool on http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/whereislro, you can see the altitude

<Display options,> Altitude (height in km) show.

You see that the height orbit is between 32 km and 72 km smile.gif

Before final orbit was it 43 and 176 km.

Now wait and see the results of the high res images.

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