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10 years - with Opportunity, The MER mission continues
Ant103
post Jan 26 2014, 02:44 PM
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My contribution to this 10 years on Mars anniversary smile.gif

(Yes, I was a "little" inspired by a recent event ^^. And pretty amusing that the 10 Years on Mars coinciding with the 30 Years of Mac:) )

Attached Image


Better resolution and explications here : http://www.db-prods.net/blog/2014/01/26/op...0-ans-sur-mars/


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James Sorenson
post Apr 21 2014, 08:05 AM
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I did this animated GIF and created deck pan's up until Sol-2814 using PDS images.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/43581439@N08/...094172/sizes/o/
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bear10829
post Mar 27 2015, 09:47 AM
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A cartoon, which you might enjoy: Opportunity Anniversary Cartoon
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Explorer1
post Mar 27 2015, 04:40 PM
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Hilarious!

The mouse-over caption suddenly reminded me; the RAT is still sharp and ready to go? Its been so long since I've heard anything about it, but I do recall at Gusev the rocks were much harder then at Meridiani, so Spirit's teeth started to wear down much faster than Opportunity's.
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TheAnt
post Mar 27 2015, 06:18 PM
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Thank you all! A huzzah huzzah for Opportunity and a chortle for 'That's Opportunity's of the planet'. =)
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RichforMars
post Jun 3 2015, 11:46 PM
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Does anyone here think this rover could make a long trek to Ares Vallis?

It came to mind, as last month I was reading the old Pathfinder mission press briefing which was posted days after the mission's last data transfer from the craft. Sojourner Rover's mission was not yet over if the battery failure hadn't occured when it did the extended mission was designed to send the six wheel probe to the outer vicinity of the landing site.

It would of been a target 50KM from Pathfinder, the challenge to anaylis the rocks.

From what I understand the rover will eventually go past marathon valley, going south.
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djellison
post Jun 4 2015, 12:05 AM
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QUOTE (RichforMars @ Jun 3 2015, 04:46 PM) *
Does anyone here think this rover could make a long trek to Ares Vallis?


No. Even in her most rapid of years - Opportunity covers, typically, about 10-15km/year. It's 2000km from Opportunity to Pathfinder - so it would take more than a century of driving.


QUOTE
It came to mind, as last month I was reading the old Pathfinder mission press briefing which was posted days after the mission's last data transfer from the craft. Sojourner Rover's mission was not yet over if the battery failure hadn't occured when it did the extended mission was designed to send the six wheel probe to the outer vicinity of the landing site.


I think you mis-read the press briefing. The plan was to send Sojourner on a long drive of around 50 meters around the lander - but not to the edge of the MPF landing ellipse. Sojourner's maximum theoretical radio range was about 500 meters - not the 30km+ to the edge of the MPF landing ellipse.
From https://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/MPF/newspio/mpf/r...es/mpfover.html
The rover team had planned to send the rover on its longest journey yet -- a 50-meter (165-foot)clockwise stroll around the lander -- to perform a series of technology experiments and hazard avoidance exercises when the communications outage occurred. That excursion was never initiated once the rover's contingency software began operating.
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RichforMars
post Jun 4 2015, 12:17 AM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Jun 4 2015, 01:05 AM) *
No. Even in her most rapid of years - Opportunity covers, typically, about 10-15km/year. It's 2000km from Opportunity to Pathfinder - so it would take more than a century of driving.




I think you mis-read the press briefing. The plan was to send Sojourner on a long drive of around 50 meters around the lander - but not to the edge of the MPF landing ellipse. Sojourner's maximum theoretical radio range was about 500 meters - not the 30km+ to the edge of the MPF landing ellipse.
From https://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/MPF/newspio/mpf/r...es/mpfover.html
The rover team had planned to send the rover on its longest journey yet -- a 50-meter (165-foot)clockwise stroll around the lander -- to perform a series of technology experiments and hazard avoidance exercises when the communications outage occurred. That excursion was never initiated once the rover's contingency software began operating.


Ah yes, okay I muddled it up, perhaps I understood that orginally. It was about two weeks ago I read this.

Ofcourse the rover could of gone beyond the fartherest rock it had been to, that was the next logical step.

But just how rough is that terrain in that region, presuming the rover went west diaganolly?

So is the Mars Six lander closer, I'm sure the terrain in that direction is quite rough.
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djellison
post Jun 4 2015, 12:22 AM
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Mars 6 is approx 1,500km to the SSW. Same story applies - it's two orders of magnitude further than any year of driving Opportunity has ever had.

You can see the landers and measure the distance between them yourself using Google Earth and switching to the Mars map.
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RichforMars
post Jun 4 2015, 12:36 AM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Jun 4 2015, 01:22 AM) *
Mars 6 is approx 1,500km to the SSW. Same story applies - it's two orders of magnitude further than any year of driving Opportunity has ever had.

You can see the landers and measure the distance between them yourself using Google Earth and switching to the Mars map.


Sure, thanks.

I guess the team in theory wouldn't want to speed a bit to such a hypothetical location.

I guess starting a thread about a new mission to that region is out of the question. Hopefully some day that may happen. It's just great place.
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