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Chang'e 3 landing and first lunar day of operations, Including landing site geology and localization
Thorsten Denk
post Dec 2 2013, 10:01 AM
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Interesting speculation by the LROC team about a possible landing place near crater Laplace A:

A Great Place to Rove!

Chang'E/Yutu could land about 10km south east, then (the rover) cross a wrinkle-ridge and reach the rim of the 8km crater.

Thorsten (this is my first name, Denk is the family name)
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PaulH51
post Dec 2 2013, 11:58 AM
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QUOTE (Thorsten Denk @ Dec 2 2013, 06:01 PM) *
Interesting speculation by the LROC team about a possible landing place near crater Laplace A:
...A Great Place to Rove!...

Welcome Thorsten smile.gif
During the Chinese cntv.cn coverage the commentators disused the landing site : the 'Bay of Rainbows'. Sinus Iridum is Latin for "Bay of Rainbows"


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tolis
post Dec 2 2013, 09:09 PM
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Looking at the lovely picture of Sinus Iridum a few posts back,
I wonder if the rim of the original crater is supposed to be
somewhere under the lava plain and whether the subsurface radar
of the rover could pick it up.
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 2 2013, 09:29 PM
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Yes, it would be under the plains, but probably too deep to be detected. I am more interested in a different possibility - there's a bright/dark boundary between two different mare units, best seen in Clementine data (I posted a false color version higher up the thread). If they land near the boundary and drive over it they may be able to detect the underlying unit beneath the overlying one and get the thickness of the top unit. In fact they may get thichnesses of multiple flow units.

Phil



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Phil Stooke
post Dec 3 2013, 01:18 AM
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This map shows the extent of the landing region, extending quite far outside Sinus Iridum as well as inside it, and the coverage by Chang'E 2 at about 1.5 m/pixel. When we know where the landing will take place I will be adding more maps to zoom in on the site.


PS - for scale, 5 degrees of latitude is 150 km.

Phil

Attached Image


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Explorer1
post Dec 3 2013, 03:13 AM
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Planning a 'Yutu route map' sticky thread Phil? wink.gif
For what it's worth, the LROC team says they'll be photographing the site a few weeks after landing the 25th, January 22nd, and February 18th)
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/news/index.php?/a...;.html#extended
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dvandorn
post Dec 3 2013, 05:37 AM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Dec 2 2013, 09:13 PM) *
Planning a 'Yutu route map' sticky thread Phil? wink.gif

You know, that may not be a bad idea. Depending on the volume of images we get from the Chinese, it may be possible to follow the traverse somewhat real-time.

I would imagine we will have to wait to see if we get enough imagery to warrant it, but I'm beginning to think that we may need a dedicated Chang'e/Yutu folder, just as each of the Mars rovers has its own folder and LRO has its own folder, etc.

I am just on pins and needles waiting to see our first new lunar surface vista in decades!

-the other Doug


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Phil Stooke
post Dec 3 2013, 05:23 PM
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I guess I wasn't subtle enough! Yes, I am planning to map the route - whether in its own thread or not, and that may depend on image access. I am collecting material for a new Moon atlas and this will be part of it.

I will rely very much on our very helpful Chinese contributors for pointing out new articles and other information, translating names of features in the landscape etc.


Phil


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RichforMars
post Dec 3 2013, 05:32 PM
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This will be interesting. I remember seeing a long while ago the High definition video from the probe that went around the moon years ago. Good Stuff.
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dvandorn
post Dec 3 2013, 06:01 PM
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With today's imaging technology, I'm hoping for HD video from the lander of the landing itself, and also of Yutu deployment and operations.

-the other Doug


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tolis
post Dec 3 2013, 07:45 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Dec 2 2013, 09:29 PM) *
Yes, it would be under the plains, but probably too deep to be detected. I am more interested in a different possibility - there's a bright/dark boundary between two different mare units, best seen in Clementine data (I posted a false color version higher up the thread). If they land near the boundary and drive over it they may be able to detect the underlying unit beneath the overlying one and get the thickness of the top unit. In fact they may get thichnesses of multiple flow units.

Phil


So, Chang'e/Yutu will be landing/roving on top of a geologic sandwich.
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Cosmic Penguin
post Dec 6 2013, 10:51 AM
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Per latest Chinese reports:

Lunar landing is planned at 15:22-15:35 UTC on December 14.

The rover should be deployed from the lander at 20:38-22:21 UTC on the same day. Then some time within the communication window on December 15 at 07:21-15:38 UTC, the lander and rover will photograph each other and sing Moon River together during dating. wink.gif

Source


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peter59
post Dec 10 2013, 09:03 PM
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At 9:24 pm, it was confirmed that Chang’e-3 had entered the new orbit.
http://www.asianews.co/change-3-probe-move...er-to-the-moon/
It seems that all is well.


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Phil Stooke
post Dec 10 2013, 10:02 PM
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Yes, only 15 km high at about 45 degrees north. Not long now.


Phil



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Phil Stooke
post Dec 12 2013, 02:43 PM
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Time for a rather trivial prediction. Unless Chang'E 3 lands at the far eastern end of the mapped landing area, the mountain Promontorium Laplace will be visible on the horizon, barring small-scale local obstructions. That will help to give an idea of the location of the landing site quite quickly.

Phil



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