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Rosetta - Post Separation Ops at Comet 67P C-G, November 14, 2014 -
Malmer
post Nov 24 2014, 07:00 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Nov 24 2014, 04:14 PM) *
The long wait for an OSIRIS color image may be over:

https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/meetingapp.cgi#Paper/22395

The AGU abstracts are online and full of good stuff, and a very small number of them contain images, including this one.

Phil



That is one very strange image indeed... the mottling is confined to a broad stripe of the image starting abruptly about 20% in from left and ending about 10% in from the right. It almost looks a little bit like it was added in post. (Scientific DRM?)

The "non mottled" areas look much nicer...

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climber
post Nov 24 2014, 07:37 PM
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I notice that Rosetta/Philae topics get (so far) about 1500 posts and 300.000 views. Wondering if this beat Curiosity around landing time?


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Spin0
post Nov 24 2014, 08:21 PM
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Newly published Navcam images of the region, 2.59 m/pixel: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/11/24/co...ch-20-november/

ADMIN NOTE: Post moved from Philae topic to correct discussion.
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neo56
post Nov 24 2014, 11:09 PM
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Very nice animation Mattias, as always smile.gif

NavCam mosaic taken on 20 November:


The shadow of the upper lobe is slightly visible on the coma.


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fredk
post Nov 25 2014, 04:23 AM
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QUOTE (Malmer @ Nov 24 2014, 08:00 PM) *
the mottling is confined to a broad stripe of the image starting abruptly about 20% in from left and ending about 10% in from the right.

Very obvious if you extract the saturation channel and stretch:
Attached Image

Very sharp boundary between mottled area and unmottled to the right. The boundary's clearly unrelated to anything on the comet.
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Malmer
post Nov 25 2014, 08:37 AM
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Yes. And the mottling seems very regular. Like a Perlin noice function...

The parts outside the area are quite nice. One could perhaps work a little on the registration of the images to get less fringing. But you can clearly see the colour of the surface change on the different terrain types. (Especially if you remove the overall red tint)
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4th rock from th...
post Nov 25 2014, 08:56 AM
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Looks like noise / low resolution data. Perhaps some channels are of much lower resolution.


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ugordan
post Nov 25 2014, 09:03 AM
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Thing is, looking at the rotational state in each of the rgb components, it's suggestive that the source frames cover the entire body, not a case of a colorized greyscale image at the center. Very odd.


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Gerald
post Nov 25 2014, 12:06 PM
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A strongly hue and saturation stretched (hence false-color) version of the colored OSIRIS image:
Attached Image

My overall, somewhat subjective and qualitative impression is, that bluish spots are correlated to holes/depressions, and reddish spots to peaks/hills.
I can't say, whether this also means some correlation of hue to activity.

From the abstract of the paper I've some hope, that the OSIRIS team might have been able to quantify this presumption.
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Malmer
post Nov 25 2014, 01:49 PM
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My bet is that the image has been intentionally degraded to make sure that it is not used by anyone to do any science.

It is just way to much low frequency noise in the individual channels and there seem to be almost no correlation between surface type and color.
The images from OSIRIS we have seen so far are very very nice. there seem to be no noise pattern of any kind in those.

If one instead looks at the areas outside the noise stripe one is treated to a much higher quality.
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Michael Capobian...
post Nov 25 2014, 04:51 PM
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Is anyone interested in matching up the diagram of probable Philae landing zones with the recent Navcam images showing those parts of the comet?
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Floyd
post Nov 25 2014, 06:33 PM
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The zones are just on the other side of the dark grey ridge. Our point of view is 180 degrees off from what we would need to spot Philae.


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Malmer
post Nov 25 2014, 11:22 PM
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QUOTE (neo56 @ Nov 25 2014, 12:09 AM) *
Very nice animation Mattias, as always smile.gif


Thank you. I think it is a lot of fun to do. It makes the comet more like a physical object to see it like that. And I get to learn the surface very intimately. I have over 150 surface features that I match over the images. They each have a number. Its strange to have a private toponomy like that.

I go: -ooh look there's a nice image of twelve. Now lets see if i cant find seventeen in this picture. nope. At least I can see 119. that's enough for the camera solve...

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Phil Stooke
post Nov 26 2014, 07:25 PM
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The jets are really multiplying now! Also, I think this is the first time the dark side has been visible silhouetted against the background coma - we've seen it before with Halley and Hartley-2 but not here.

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/11/26/co...ow-of-the-coma/

Phil


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SteveM
post Nov 26 2014, 09:35 PM
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Just noticed -- actually just realized what I've been seeing for some time -- that the jets are primarily pointing toward the Sun, while a comet's dust and ion tails point away from the Sun. Can Rosetta observe the process by which the trajectory changes as they become tails, or is Rosetta too close to see that effect?

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