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Philae Wakes Up!
scalbers
post Jun 14 2015, 06:33 PM
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Here is a TF1 news story, with a different interview?

http://lci.tf1.fr/science/nouvelles-techno...nt-8621490.html


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Harder
post Jun 14 2015, 06:53 PM
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Thanks for the link to the news item, this is probably what was referred to! Earlier I read the CNES website, where it was mentioned that Mr. le Gall was invited for the TF1 news. I thought that if there was going to be any news about a next contact with Philae, then this would be a good PR moment with the CNES director himself on TV.
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neo56
post Jun 14 2015, 07:01 PM
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I watched TF1 news with Mr Le Gall interview but he said nothing more than what was previously announced on the ESA website.


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brellis
post Jun 14 2015, 07:21 PM
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Great news! What discoveries are yet to come, and will we learn more about Philae's adventures on the surface in these intervening months? Did it get bumped around by an outgassing or some surface rumbling? Did it move from where they thought it was when the batteries ran out to a place that gets more sun light? *gets popcorn ready*

Confidence was expressed by the mission team that it could reboot as it has; I had wondered if it could survive another orbit and get rebooted 6.5 years from now. Chances of that seem very slim based on this from the BBC article:

QUOTE
Many people had worried that the very low temperatures endured by the lander on the icy comet could have done irreparable damage to its electronic circuitry.
The fact that both its computer and transmitter have fired up to contact home indicates that the engineering has stood up remarkably well in what must have been really quite challenging conditions these past seven months.


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nprev
post Jun 14 2015, 07:52 PM
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Very exciting news indeed, and a triumph for the mission engineers. smile.gif

Remember that despite the initial good news I'm sure that there will be several days (at least) of checkout activity, and Philae is in what is arguably the most dynamic surface environment ever experienced by a lander. Let's root for the team and be grateful for every bit we get. wink.gif


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deglr6328
post Jun 14 2015, 08:36 PM
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Wow, this site still exists....and I somehow even remembered my password after I don't know how many years!

Anywhats, I heard a scientist interviewed on the BBC who said the first priority of the mission would be to drill another comet sample and analyze it!?! Is this REALLY the case? Obviously they need to do a lot of work waking individual instruments back up and transferring old accumulated data, but even then is it possible to repeat the sampling experiment at all? I was under the impression that the COSAC instrument exhausted its helium carrier gas for the GS/MS and maybe some other consumables during the first attempt in the initial battery powered 60hr science window. Can anyone inform further?
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katodomo
post Jun 14 2015, 09:48 PM
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Only one oven for COSAC was filled (or supposed to be filled) by SD2 as far as I know. Since the system is built for multiple (26) runs I would assume that the helium regulator with its two tanks doesn't just fully open its valve on the first sample and let it run till dry. Even then a drilled sample could still at least be evaluated under the CIVA MI spectroscopic microscope.

Since the SD2 and Ptolemy/COSAC require quite a bit of power drilling won't be on any priority list though.
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MahFL
post Jun 14 2015, 10:11 PM
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I think they concluded no solid sample got into the oven, and it was gas that was analyzed.
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vikingmars
post Jun 14 2015, 10:13 PM
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QUOTE (Harder @ Jun 14 2015, 08:22 PM) *
Vikingmars, did you perhaps watch the 20:00 TF1 news? Monsieur Le Gall was announced but I can't pick up TF1 to hear what he has to say, so much for my "TripleSat" antenna dish!

In fact, nothing new : just PR from Mr Le Gall...
The REAL news about Philae are always coming from CNES' Toulouse Space Center, so stay tuned !
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ZLD
post Jun 14 2015, 10:24 PM
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Wonderful news!

I think this is probably one of the most interesting times in planetary exploration with the broadest spectrum of missions occurring. Two dwarf planets with Dawn at Ceres and New Horizons at Pluto, a long term comet orbiter with Rosetta, a resurrected comet lander with Philae, a (possibly) resurrected Venus orbiter with Akatsuki, tons of data streaming back from Mars and Saturn, next year Jupiter. Truly the crème de la crème of engineering feats in recent times.


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Harder
post Jun 15 2015, 07:53 AM
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this morning the CNES director Mr Le Gall reported on France 2 that Philae is fully awake and that a second contact was established, lasting several tens of minutes.
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climber
post Jun 15 2015, 08:16 AM
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Some planning info that were set up before first contact (in french) : https://rosetta.cnes.fr/fr/le-sonc-prepare-...eveil-de-philae

They plan direct science without using batteries so they'll start with the less power dependent instruments: ROMAP SESAME CIVA & ROLIS.
Plans will certainly change regarding actual situation but I'll bet for pictures been taken pretty soon since knowing Philae environment will considerably help planning.


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climber
post Jun 15 2015, 08:26 AM
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It looks like MUPUS would be first on the list: https://twitter.com/philae_mupus/status/610356676202491904


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Herobrine
post Jun 15 2015, 02:48 PM
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http://isee3.p3s.nl/philae/ has started displaying new data. So far, it looks like it's just the Rosetta systems (ESS, MSS) with actual data.
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stone
post Jun 15 2015, 03:26 PM
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QUOTE (deglr6328 @ Jun 14 2015, 09:36 PM) *
I was under the impression that the COSAC instrument exhausted its helium carrier gas for the GS/MS and maybe some other consumables during the first attempt in the initial battery powered 60hr science window. Can anyone inform further?

COSAC has a very nice gas dosing system and it has not used much of its helium yet. So if there was no major problem during the very cold time on the comet it is likely to work again. With the active comet the COSAC and Ptolemy mass spectra will be a lot of fun to look at.

There is no house keeping data from the instruments yet, so it is a little bit early to speculate which one will be the first to be switched on.

For me the wonder is that Philae survived the 100°C below zero and is still working.

Thanks for the support!

One of the COSAC team.
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