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Juno Science Results
hendric
post May 25 2017, 06:19 PM
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https://www.nasa.gov/feature/junoteleconference

Many surprises!

Jupiter not uniform below clouds!

Giant ammonia plume comes up from equator!

Core diffuse, possibly dissolving!

Magnetic field up close has surprised!


Congrats on the amateur images everyone!


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Gerald
post May 25 2017, 10:59 PM
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Here a link to the abstracts of the GRL special issue "Early Results: Juno at Jupiter".
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hendric
post May 26 2017, 06:21 AM
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http://science.sciencemag.org/content/356/6340

Science magazine also has a couple of articles on Juno results.


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ChrisC
post May 26 2017, 04:21 PM
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Full news conference with slides:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6o9FiTf1vZE

Time markers:
01:15 Diane Brown intro
02:43 Scott Bolton, orbit overview, three methods to peer into interior
09:20 microwave results (down to 350 km below clouds)
16:00 gravity field discussion
17:00 Jack Connerney with magnetic field results
20:00 aurorae
22:30 particle impact detections
24:10 Heidi Becker with view looking OUT past rings at Orion, no radiation hits to image sensor
27:45 Candy Hansen with JunoCam
34:45 back to Scott Bolton for audible radio results and next orbit plans
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nprev
post May 27 2017, 06:36 AM
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ADMIN NOTE: Edited topic title to make this an omnibus thread for Juno findings (pressers, papers, etc.)


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JRehling
post May 27 2017, 11:31 PM
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I was curious about the estimated mass of heavy elements in Jupiter, which is possibly the single most fundamental statistic that Juno can derive. At this admittedly very early point in Juno's mission, the paper by Wahl, et al estimated 7-25 Earth masses. Keep in mind that Militzer, et al (2008) estimated the same at 14-18 Earth masses, which is better constrained. Hopefully, the remaining (>90%) of Juno's orbits will nail this down much better. (I wonder if the earlier result actually had a greater uncertainty… some research admits to some fundamental unknowns and derive results that are presuming some quantities that aren't actually known.)

What Jupiter's structure is like tells us about the evolution and dynamics of large planets, but the bulk composition tells us the really fundamental thing – what kinds of protoplanetary clouds make what kinds of planetary systems in general.
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alan
post Oct 16 2017, 03:36 PM
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Michael Wong‏ @Miquai

Until today, I have never had a class that audibly FREAKED OUT at something a professor showed. What a time to be alive.
3:07 PM - 29 Sep 2017 from Pasadena, CA

https://twitter.com/Miquai/status/913887910637715458

In reference to a Juno result that was under embargo, perhaps it will revealed at the DPS meeting this week.
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elakdawalla
post Oct 19 2017, 03:05 AM
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Sadly, no Juno press briefing this week. I'm told AGU should be good.


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Tom Tamlyn
post Jan 11 2018, 04:42 AM
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Is there any likelihood that a video of Scott Bolton's AAS231 plenary session lecture on results from the Juno mission will be publicly released?

I read something on the AAS website to the effect that videotapes of ordinary meeting sessions are posted on the AAS members' site as a "member benefit," but I was hoping that the video of this lecture wouldn't be restricted to members.
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JRehling
post Jan 11 2018, 04:35 PM
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Some people have posted on Twitter photos of and comments about Bolton's Jan. 9 lecture. Some of the Twitter quotes are ambiguous or cryptic, but there are some definite and stunning new discoveries.

• Cyclones circling Jupiter's north pole form an octagon, whereas the south pole shows a pentagon.
• Jupiter's magnetic field twice as strong as expected.
• More lightning than expected.
• Odd-numbered harmonics in gravitational field expected to be zero, but aren't.
• Impossible for one or two entry probes to provide the big picture. (Implications for future Saturn, etc. missions.)
• Aurorae somehow switch off at night.
• Great Red Spot has roots that reach much more deeply (>350 km) into atmosphere than zones and belts do.
• All heavy elements enriched (over solar) by same amount, except water is depleted. (Galileo Probe result?)

Overall: "Everything" we thought we knew about Jupiter's interior before Juno was wrong.

I note from IR images that most polar cyclones have swirling hot/cold centers, but three at south pole cold only.

As mentioned in previous releases:
• Larger, fuzzy core instead of small, compact one or none.
• River of gases rich in ammonia flowing from depths up to surface near equator.

Profoundly spectacular video showing a dive through the Great Red Spot:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lsKC1NVaqw

A long approach video shows Galileans orbiting "half" Jupiter for (several?) weeks.

My sense is that this talk seems to have contained more significant discoveries concerning one world than we've seen in a long time except maybe Pluto; that's rather stunning when one considers that this is the sixth mission dedicated to Jupiter, and moreover, that the mission isn't half over.
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jman0war
post Feb 27 2018, 06:51 PM
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Wow some very nice image processing on this forum.
I hope someone assembles a best-of and puts them into a single thread someday.

How close to those cloud tops do you think humanity will ever mange to reach ?

Via unmanned satellite of course.

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Explorer1
post Feb 27 2018, 07:55 PM
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Well we had the Galileo probe, which went right through the cloud tops (and below!) in 1995. Do you mean the lowest possible orbit?
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jman0war
post Feb 27 2018, 08:54 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Feb 27 2018, 08:55 PM) *
Well we had the Galileo probe, which went right through the cloud tops (and below!) in 1995. Do you mean the lowest possible orbit?

Ah, i guess i don't remember seeing any stunning images like these.
I do remember the moons though.

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JRehling
post Feb 28 2018, 04:16 AM
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The Galileo Probe had no camera. There's no guarantee that a view from inside the clouds would be interesting, or – even if beautiful – scientifically rewarding, and it would have been a very expensive instrument needing a lot of bandwidth during a very short time window.

The Galileo Orbiter returned some very nice images of Jupiter's clouds, but Juno is producing a more stunning gallery, thanks to people on this board and others. There were no programmatic scientific investigations for JunoCam, but it seems increasingly likely that there'll be scientific value had from them sooner or later.
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mcaplinger
post Feb 28 2018, 06:44 AM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Feb 27 2018, 08:16 PM) *
The Galileo Probe had no camera... it would have been a very expensive instrument needing a lot of bandwidth during a very short time window.

There was actually a proposal for a low-cost camera that fit within the data allocation for the Galileo probe, but it wasn't selected.


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