IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Juno, perijove 11, February 07, 2018
Kevin Gill
post Feb 9 2018, 09:27 PM
Post #16


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 26
Joined: 22-July 14
Member No.: 7220



Perijove 11, #'s 10 & 11
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
Attached Image
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Kevin Gill
post Feb 9 2018, 09:31 PM
Post #17


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 26
Joined: 22-July 14
Member No.: 7220



Perijove 11, #'s 12, 13, 14, 15
Attached thumbnail(s)
Attached Image
Attached Image

Attached Image
Attached Image
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sean
post Feb 9 2018, 09:38 PM
Post #18


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 709
Joined: 10-November 15
Member No.: 7837



Lovely work Kevin!

Here are my initial attempts with...

PJ11_12 [Gerald Eichstadt]


&

PJ11_13 [Matt Brealey] *updated to full res*


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bjorn Jonsson
post Feb 10 2018, 12:53 AM
Post #19


IMG to PNG GOD
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 1979
Joined: 19-February 04
From: Near fire and ice
Member No.: 38



Here is my preliminary processing of image PJ11_13 in an approximately true color/contrast version and an enhanced version. This image includes the very bright cloud feature discussed earlier in this thread. I was careful not to saturate it during the processing. These images have been cropped and are also enlarged by a factor of 1.2 relative to the original images.

Attached Image
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sean
post Feb 10 2018, 01:20 AM
Post #20


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 709
Joined: 10-November 15
Member No.: 7837



Here is PJ11_11 [G.Eichstadt]






--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Sean
post Feb 11 2018, 12:31 PM
Post #21


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 709
Joined: 10-November 15
Member No.: 7837



PJ11_13_crop [G.Eichstadt]








--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 06:07 PM
Post #22


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



QUOTE (JRehling @ Feb 9 2018, 07:24 PM) *
There's so much to like here. Great work, once again!

I am struck by the color in that bright cloud: Specifically, the nonuniformity of it. And, again on the note that this non-science instrument may yield some impressive science, I wonder of the utility of this image, and others like it, for providing insight as to the still-unknown chromophores in Jupiter's clouds. If the chemical reactions that produce chromophores are produced at different combinations of altitude and solar incidence, images showing variations in hue in cloud surfaces that have freshly risen could potentially rule out some candidate reactions/compounds.

There is certainly variation in hue over that bright cloud. How much is due to compositional variation and how much due to variations in illumination is another question. I'm sure it wouldn't be trivial to perform the required analysis, but this is one of the first images I've seen that suggests that it's possible.

This, and other questions are going to be discussed on a new tab on the missionjuno site, called "Think Tank".
The last inconsitencies I've been aware of have been fixed early today, such that I think, that I can point to this new feature now.
Candy's basic idea is an experiment with "science in a fishbowl", as far as it's possible with topics that are eventually intended to be published in regular peer-reviewed papers.

Within the PJ11 thread, I've posted links to a first set of PJ11 maps. They will e.g. help to narrow down the locations in terms of longitude and planetocentric latitude, which areas will be worth to render in high resolution, in order to measure small-scale features, like the bright cloud and its structure.
Regarding the color, it's always better to have at least two images of the same target to mostly rule out camera and processing artifacts.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 11:11 PM
Post #23


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



Some more PJ-11 close ups:
#19, and #20:
Attached Image
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 11:13 PM
Post #24


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



#21, and #22:
Attached Image
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 11:16 PM
Post #25


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



#23, #24, and #25:
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 11:18 PM
Post #26


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



#26.#27, and #28:
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 11:23 PM
Post #27


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



#31, #32, #33, and #34:
Attached Image

Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image

The latter three have been taken with TDI 1, 3, and 6.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 12 2018, 11:32 PM
Post #28


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



#35.#40, #41, #42, and #43:
Attached Image

Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image


Attached Image


with some more south polar views.

The according PNG versions are submitted to missionjuno. Only for #19, I've overlooked two processing artifacts (in the upper and lower left corners) in the version I've submitted to missionjuno.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
JRehling
post Feb 13 2018, 04:19 PM
Post #29


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2078
Joined: 20-April 05
Member No.: 321



QUOTE (Gerald @ Feb 12 2018, 11:07 AM) *
This, and other questions are going to be discussed on a new tab on the missionjuno site, called "Think Tank".


That's great to know, Gerald. I'll enjoy seeing it.

With the chromophores question, there's a bit of a real world case here of "How do you know the refrigerator light goes off when you shut the door?" Or, the somewhat more mystical quantum mechanical question (yes, facetious) "Is the Moon still there when I don't look at it?" If sunlight plays a role in the creation of chromophores, and nobody doubts that it does, getting multiple observations, or even a single observation, is troubled a bit by the expectation that the phenomenon in question will vary over any set of observations. If the chromophores evolve (chemically or physically or via transport) much faster than a single Juno orbit, then we may have to rely upon a single hours-long perijove to study this phenomenon. Or, of course, several perijoves, studying the phenomenon longitudinally. (For example, you don't need to visit a city for 80 years to understand how people of all ages dress. You can see children, teenagers, young adults, older adults in one hour and piece together the timeline from those many cases.)

So, it may be informative to image the same active cloud formation twice in a perijove, but here I think the secondary role of imaging runs afoul of the mission's top priority, which wouldn't allow that sort of wasteful repointing.

In any event, good job and thank you for reducing the raw data to the point where such questions can even be asked!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gerald
post Feb 13 2018, 06:39 PM
Post #30


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2170
Joined: 7-December 12
Member No.: 6780



Regarding the quantum physical question: When I don't look to the moon, but I see my shadow on the floor, I know, that the moon is there, and forced its wave function to collapse/decohere in my branch of the wave function of the universe.
Regarding Jupiter's chromophores: If the question of the photochemistry of chromophores in Jupiter's atmosphere has a convincing chance to be solved by a sequence of JunoCam images, we can ask for an according campaign, if that's even necessary, since we already have image sequences of the same target area, and the chromophores may need to make their (quantum-physical analog of a) decision, how stable they are.

My expectation is, that they are considerably longer-lived than one Jupiter day. With a global statistical analysis, we'll get mostly shading and scattering effects. Those might be able to be used to make conclusions about the grain size distribution of aerosols in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. We won't distinguish easily effects by polarization. Modeling and subtracting these ingredients might eventually add some constraint to the chemical stability of the chromophores. But if chromophores would change rapidly under sunlight, I'd expect this to be pretty obvious by a systematic change of Jupiter's color as a function of solar illumination, or of distance from the terminator.

I'd think, that long-term changes can be evidenced a little better by considering the bluish hue over Jupiter's polar regions compared to lower latitudes. But even here, we need to consider the overall structure of Jupiter's atmosphere depending on latitude that might act as a latitude-dependend color filter. So, it's certainly a long way to conclusions about microscopical dynamics and photochemistry, at least on the mere basis of JunoCam images.

I'll try to contribute my part to pin these things down as far as the data allow.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th October 2018 - 05:52 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.