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Vesta departure and journey to Ceres, A new phase of Dawn adventure
chuckclark
post Sep 17 2012, 03:02 PM
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Soon as Phil gives the okay, I'll get started on a fold-up map of the thing.
Phil . . . ?
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dilo
post Sep 18 2012, 05:43 PM
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Update:
Attached Image

Last engine stop, yesterday, lasted about 9 hours based on speed data; as consequence, Hill sphere exit date shifted slightly ahead (Sep,23 around 20 UTC).

PS: in the last posts, the two left plots (long term range/speed and Energy trends) weren't updated correctly, I'm sorry for this!


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dilo
post Sep 21 2012, 11:31 AM
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Update:
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Final Hill sphere exit date estimation: Sep,23, 19.30 UTC.


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Phil Stooke
post Sep 21 2012, 04:03 PM
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"Phil . . . ? "

OK Chuck - here I have taken those two polar maps of topography and reprojected them into simple cylindrical. There are a few very minor errors in this composite but nothing to worry you in your work. It should be easy to match this with published gridded maps to get crater names, lat and long etc. (a grid is faintly visible on this, from the originals). But this gives you the topography to locate your ridge lines etc.

PS - apparent mismatch along the equator is caused by different illumination of the rendered shaded relief between the two halves.

Phil

Attached Image


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dilo
post Sep 24 2012, 10:55 PM
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This is my final update plot of Vesta departure:
Attached Image

Dawn is definitively out of Vesta sphere of influence, exact time depends on which Hill sphere radius you assume. In fact, while classic formula is based on average distance of the body from Sun, others reccomend to use pericenter distance, which gives a smaller radius; moreover, I calculated also the present Hill radius based on current heliocentric distance.
Here below my results, based on interpolation of Mystic simulator distances (sorry for improper use of "code" format but table format appears problematic otherwise!):
CODE
Method (Sun distance)   Distance from Vesta     date/time UTC
Periastron                  113180 km           Sep, 22  12:40
Average                     124180 km           Sep, 23  18:52
Current                     134750 km           Sep, 24  22:30
I tend to prephere last one, which occurrred few hours ago, probably during the weekly engine shutdown...


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Explorer1
post Nov 3 2013, 05:57 PM
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New blog post about Ceres cruise:

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs...ward-ceres.html
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Explorer1
post Dec 7 2013, 03:39 AM
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New info about Ceres plan, with details on hybrid control mode for low-altitude mapping orbit:

http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/feature_stories/D..._Dance_Card.asp
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Holder of the Tw...
post Dec 1 2014, 09:51 PM
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According to the November 2014 Dawn Journal, today is the day that Dawn takes its first resolved photos of Ceres, nine pixels across. These are being taken mainly to calibrate the camera. Still a couple of months to go before they start getting the really good stuff.
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Astro0
post Dec 1 2014, 11:34 PM
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DSS43 at Canberra DSN is tracking DAWN right now. Not far off sun-point as you can see.

Attached Image



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Paolo
post Dec 5 2014, 03:33 PM
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the Max Planck Institute has a release (i n German) with the first, distant images of Ceres:
http://www.mps.mpg.de/3867888/PM_2014_12_0..._eine_neue_Welt
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Holder of the Tw...
post Dec 5 2014, 03:41 PM
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Here is a link to the picture on the Dawn web site: Dawn snaps Ceres
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SpaceScout
post Dec 5 2014, 07:25 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Dec 5 2014, 04:33 PM) *
the Max Planck Institute has a release (i n German) with the first, distant images of Ceres:

From the Max Planck release:
"up to today, the sharpest images of Ceres were acquired by HST. Starting end of January 2015, the Framinc Camera images will match and exceed that resolution. From that moment on, we'll enter a new Land."


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peter59
post Dec 6 2014, 10:51 AM
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Without a doubt, Ceres is significantly larger than Vesta.
Attached Image

In three or four weeks should start to reveal the first surface details.


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jgoldader
post Dec 6 2014, 12:05 PM
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This is exciting! smile.gif Can't wait to see Ceres close up. Almost looks like albedo differences in the photo, but could just be phase effects.
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SFJCody
post Dec 6 2014, 12:45 PM
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Exciting... but in a bittersweet way. This finishes the initial reconnaissance of the rocky terrestrial worlds in our local neighbourhood. If we want fresh terra incognita after this we have to go way, way out to the solar system's frigid fringes.
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