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Ceres Nomenclature, Feature names approved for use on Ceres
volcanopele
post Jul 7 2015, 07:07 PM
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16 craters on Ceres now have official names
http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/SearchRe...er%2C%20craters

The crater with the main bright spots is now named Occator

I'm working on a quick map with the names


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volcanopele
post Jul 7 2015, 07:44 PM
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And here's that map with names (the mosaic map by Steve Albers)

Attached Image


So Spot 5 crater is Occator. Spot 1 crater is Haulani.


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Habukaz
post Jul 7 2015, 07:46 PM
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I guess that makes them the Occator spots. Could the spots themselves receive a name, as an albedo feature or something?

Nice map.


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MarsInMyLifetime
post Jul 7 2015, 09:34 PM
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QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jul 7 2015, 01:07 PM) *
16 craters on Ceres now have official names
http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/SearchRe...er%2C%20craters

The crater with the main bright spots is now named Occator

I'm working on a quick map with the names


If they were to add Exeter and Interocitor as names I think I would turn blue with nerdy excitement.


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dvandorn
post Jul 7 2015, 11:16 PM
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Trying to get my head around how to pronounce the Spot 5 crater, I googled the name. Lots and lots of results identifying Occator as the God of the Harrow (or hoeing, in modern parlance), whose spirit was invoked by priests of Ceres, but very little with useful pronunciation guides.

What little I found suggests it is pronounced ah-CATE-ore. Not OCK-a-tore.


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Daniele_bianchin...
post Jul 7 2015, 11:22 PM
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it's Strange. Im don't result occator in roman divinitY. ...
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stevesliva
post Jul 7 2015, 11:33 PM
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I think there's a fair chance the first syllable is a long o and the penultimate is stressed.
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charborob
post Jul 8 2015, 12:29 AM
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And in Latin, the "a" should be pronounced as in "cat", and not as in "cake".
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jekbradbury
post Jul 8 2015, 12:39 AM
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In the Latin (occātor) the first syllable is a short o but the second is a long a, so the accent falls on the penult (/oˈkaː.tor/). The traditional English pronunciation would then be /ə(ʊ)ˈkeiː.tər/, or either oh-KAY-ter or uh-KAY-ter; a close analogue would be the first syllable of "Olympus" and the next two syllables as in "crater" but without the 'r.'
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nogal
post Jul 8 2015, 12:28 PM
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QUOTE (jekbradbury @ Jul 8 2015, 01:39 AM) *
In the Latin (occātor) the first syllable is a short o but the second is a long a, so the accent falls on the penult (/oˈkaː.tor/).


Thank you all for the posts on Ceres mythology and name pronounciation, I had no idea about the "helper gods" so I went searching. As usual, the Wikipedia proved to be a good starting point.

My native language is Portuguese, a Latin-based language. However I never learned Latin, so I had some fun digging around for the most likely pronunciation: it turns out there are four competing ones. Here is a link to WHEELOCK'S LATIN, a very reputed source.

So the classic latin pronunciation (I hope I got it right unsure.gif ) seems to be very close to my "gut feeling": Attached File  Occator.mp3 ( 46.17K ) Number of downloads: 169


Fernando
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stevesliva
post Jul 8 2015, 05:32 PM
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QUOTE (jekbradbury @ Jul 7 2015, 08:39 PM) *
In the Latin (occātor) the first syllable is a short o but the second is a long a, so the accent falls on the penult (/oˈkaː.tor/). The traditional English pronunciation would then be /ə(ʊ)ˈkeiː.tər/, or either oh-KAY-ter or uh-KAY-ter; a close analogue would be the first syllable of "Olympus" and the next two syllables as in "crater" but without the 'r.'


"oh-KAY-ter" is what I meant by long o on the first syllable. It seems there's some wiggle in Latin pronunciation to declare the first syllable "open" and therefore a long vowel.... but I don't really know what makes a syllable "open." I *think* it's open if you're not saying ock-kate-er, and instead drop the consonant from the first syllable, opening it. But that depends on what the Romans said.
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TheAnt
post Jul 8 2015, 05:51 PM
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QUOTE (stevesliva @ Jul 8 2015, 07:32 PM) *
"oh-KAY-ter" is what I meant by long o on the first syllable. It seems there's some wiggle in Latin pronunciation to declare the first syllable "open" and therefore a long vowel.... but I don't really know what makes a syllable "open." I *think* it's open if you're not saying ock-kate-er, and instead drop the consonant from the first syllable, opening it. But that depends on what the Romans said.


I think jekbradbury's suggestion /oˈkaː.tor/ is a very good one with the first vowel as when someone say 'oh' in short beginning with a flat 'o' and no embellishment.
But I'd like to add that the a be "open" in this case mean no diphthong to the vowel, which is something English / American speakers often have a very hard time not doing, a longer 'o' and certainly not followed by 'kate' but 'ká' then 'torr'.
Yes I got a "leetle" insight into latin due to a small insignificant involvement with biologists that are so snobbish they still use the Latin language. =)



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stevesliva
post Jul 8 2015, 05:55 PM
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If I were a planetary scientist, I probably wouldn't want to butcher fossae and chasma and mare and all the rest either. Luckily, I can just write them on the internets.
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Gladstoner
post Jul 8 2015, 09:53 PM
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I've mentioned it before and will do so again here now that there is a Ceres Nomenclature thread....

I hope the powers-that-be consider the name 'Corn Palace' for the large mountain. Even though the name sounds a bit corny (no pun intended smile.gif ), it is the name of an agricultural festival in Mitchell, South Dakota (which I think would satisfy the nomenclatural rules for Cerean non-crater features), and both the mountain and festival's name-sake structure have imposing edifices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Palace
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Daniele_bianchin...
post Jul 9 2015, 09:47 AM
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I am not satisfied with some names .. :-/
I hope in a Fossae name Like "Caereris Mundus", a Fossae that was open only three days a year in ancient Rome..
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