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Ceres Low-Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO)
ZLD
post Jan 15 2016, 07:37 PM
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LAMO 7
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JohnVV
post Jan 17 2016, 06:06 AM
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a few low angle views from LAMO-6
PIA20296
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JohnVV
post Jan 20 2016, 04:00 AM
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some more renderings

This time "Kupalo Crater"
http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images...tml?id=PIA20192


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ZLD
post Jan 20 2016, 04:42 AM
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LAMO 8
My blog post





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ZLD
post Jan 21 2016, 04:22 PM
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LAMO 9
My blog post





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ZLD
post Jan 24 2016, 12:14 AM
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My blog post

LAMO 10




LAMO 11








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ZLD
post Jan 25 2016, 08:17 PM
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My blog post
LAMO 12





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ZLD
post Jan 26 2016, 08:17 PM
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My blog post
LAMO 13





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Gladstoner
post Jan 26 2016, 08:46 PM
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QUOTE (ZLD @ Jan 26 2016, 02:17 PM) *

Fascinating features.

So what's with those radiating 'bird feet'? If I saw those hills on Earth, I'd think they were an erosional remnant of a larger mountain. But on Ceres, there is no apparent process to remove the material in such a manner.
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ZLD
post Jan 26 2016, 09:52 PM
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My best guess is that right after impact, the basin uplifted into something resembling the central ridge you see, and as it rapidly cooled, the exterior sort-of buckled inwards as it compressed from cooling unevenly. This would only be possible if this region is heavier in rocky material.

I will say, I am especially intrigued by the feature at center left, along the central ridge. Tall peak, central pit, who knows...


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Ken2
post Jan 26 2016, 11:21 PM
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QUOTE (Gladstoner @ Jan 26 2016, 12:46 PM) *
Fascinating features.

So what's with those radiating 'bird feet'? If I saw those hills on Earth, I'd think they were an erosional remnant of a larger mountain. But on Ceres, there is no apparent process to remove the material in such a manner.



I favor the least interesting explanation as evident in LAMO G, I think it's due to settling and sliding of the puffy ejecta in-fill of the craters.

Most craters* start out as an empty cones, and in-fill by their ejecta and landslides, and the ejecta of countless other craters. The craters are filled of unstable relatively puffy fine-grained ejecta. Subsequent impacts cause huge Ceres-quakes which will cause landslides (clearly evident all over the place) and settling, which I believe is the majority of the cracks on crater floors.


*Most craters (other then young ones big enough to have lava in-fill at the time of creation, and very large ones (I don't know what that size is on Ceres, and it's probably a function of age))
e.g. old (earliest) craters have a harder surface which may rebound more. Also assuming it was mostly a molten interior at the time of formation, then the lava in-fill (and after a given crater could no longer expose lava) then elastic rebound would be decreasing as a function of age. The later craters would be formed in a puffy impact gardened surface which looks to be km thick. An impact in a loosely bound matrix would evacuate a clean cone and then have severe landslides back into the pit. It's even possible that most of the central peaks are in fact landslide conjunctions (i.e. if there are landslides all around the craters they would meet in the middle and after a few met the forming ridge/peak would accumulate subsequence landslide terminating debris as the crater in-filled. I think these type of processes may explain the majority of Cere's crater's features. I wonder what magnitude Cere's quake is generated for a given impact diameter and distance from the impact?
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JohnVV
post Jan 27 2016, 12:37 AM
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impact , stresses, land movement and so on

i bet that when the papers start coming out it will be many things all having a part

No 3d renderings yet , just a heightmap
-- 8 bit normalized 0,255
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Gladstoner
post Jan 27 2016, 02:19 AM
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Occator and Dantu: Before and after?

Attached Image


Possibly analogous features marked:

Attached Image


Can't wait to see the Occator close-ups....
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Bill Harris
post Jan 27 2016, 03:21 AM
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The Asterisk Central peaks are likely volcanic.

--Bill


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ZLD
post Jan 27 2016, 09:29 AM
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I'd like them to be volcanic as well but there's little to show they are. No visible flows anywhere really. Not that they couldn't have long since been erased, but there's no evidence to push for it. Several mound-like features are present with what would seem to be central depressions.

Also, interesting comparison Gladstoner. I definitely think there is some resemblance here. However, I have to wonder that if they have been through similar processes, in regards to Dantu, why has a small patch of bright material near the cracks remained while everything else has disappeared, especially a bright central patch of it in the center of the central ridge. One possibility is that it has been recently active, long after most of the bight material was covered up or insolation caused the material to become less reflective. But if it was recently active, then how? Strange place.


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