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MSL Post Landing - Commissioning Period & Early Observations, Commissioning Activity Period 1B - Sols 9 through 16
JRehling
post Aug 22 2012, 08:38 AM
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dougr, Viking lasted more than 1 martian year and it was in the tropics, so it was at some time at the subsolar latitude.

We've seen that temperatures on Mars can vary extremely sharply as a function of distance from the surface, with centimeters a relevant scale. So unlike on Earth, we have to take the comparison between two different systems with a grain of salt. Temperatures derived from IR reflectance as detected from orbit have shown temperatures far higher than any lander has detected, in part due to sampling the very hottest locations on the planet, in part due to measuring the surface and not the air a few decimeters above.
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chris
post Aug 22 2012, 09:34 AM
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In relation to the wind sensors, extensive details of the REMS instruments are available here

Edit: typo
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Stellingwerff
post Aug 22 2012, 09:45 AM
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The top of MtSharp in full detail:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/pr...NCAM00504M_.JPG

(actually: the top of the local part of the upper mount, the real top lies far back)

[Edit] Ah, too busy with the website to notice that there was already another round of similar pictures yestersol..... Sorry for spamming...

grz,
Ludo.
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Drkskywxlt
post Aug 22 2012, 12:17 PM
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QUOTE (charleski @ Aug 21 2012, 08:34 PM) *
Here's a quickie composite showing the model (in green), actual pressure readings in blue and the temperature in red.


I think you misinterpreted the times or something. There's no (significant) phase distortion. Here's the REMS team's comparison:

http://marsweather.com/models-come-up-against-data
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ollopa
post Aug 22 2012, 01:08 PM
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Anyone know the times of to-Sol's comms passes? Around now, I'm guessing.
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charleski
post Aug 22 2012, 01:44 PM
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QUOTE (Drkskywxlt @ Aug 22 2012, 01:17 PM) *
I think you misinterpreted the times or something. There's no (significant) phase distortion. Here's the REMS team's comparison:

http://marsweather.com/models-come-up-against-data


The phase distortion is present in the model as well, but more pronounced in the actual data. Basically the peaks are broader and flatter than the troughs.
Here's an image showing air pressure changes in the Caribbean Sea as a weather pattern moves over - the diurnal changes are far closer to a sinusoid with amplitude modulation from the weather-front (Source, image down the page in a comment).

Pathfinder found even more complex variations in pressure. Maybe the result of Curiosity being on a crater floor rather than an exposed plain.

I did get the scale of the model a bit wrong in the composite I posted. The graph on their page is correct.
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jmknapp
post Aug 22 2012, 02:26 PM
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QUOTE (ollopa @ Aug 22 2012, 08:08 AM) *
Anyone know the times of to-Sol's comms passes? Around now, I'm guessing.


Check http://mslfan.com/2012/08/08/msl-almanac/

times UTC

QUOTE
Wednesday, August 22
3:21am ODY pass
3:37am MRO pass
3:44am earthrise
5:18am ODY pass
5:59am sunrise sol 16
6:23am MEX pass
9:47am earth zenith
12:06pm noon sol 16
12:17pm MEX pass
3:43pm MRO pass
3:49pm earthset
4:13pm ODY pass
6:13pm sunset sol 16
6:15pm ODY pass


The MRO pass coming up in about an hour (3:43pm UTC) is a very good one (times LMST):

QUOTE
rise azimuth 175, 03:31:08 P.M.
zenith azimuth 269, 03:37:37 P.M.
set azimuth 351, 03:44:25 P.M.
min range 274 km
max elevation 79


The calendar lists some marginal passes (i.e., even if the satellite only barely peeks above the horizon), so click through to get all the details.

I wonder if MEX has been used for downlinking at all yet. It's above the horizon for hours sometimes, so seems like there's a lot of potential.


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Ant103
post Aug 22 2012, 03:29 PM
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Sol 15 panoramic, showing a large piece of sky. I love this kind of view smile.gif



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djellison
post Aug 22 2012, 03:32 PM
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QUOTE (jmknapp @ Aug 22 2012, 06:26 AM) *
I wonder if MEX has been used for downlinking at all yet. It's above the horizon for hours sometimes, so seems like there's a lot of potential.


http://blogs.esa.int/mex/2012/08/20/first-...with-curiosity/
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Drkskywxlt
post Aug 22 2012, 03:38 PM
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QUOTE (charleski @ Aug 22 2012, 09:44 AM) *
The phase distortion is present in the model as well, but more pronounced in the actual data. Basically the peaks are broader and flatter than the troughs.


Ok, I think we're talking about different things. For a plot like that, typically in atmospheric science the "phase" is referring to the local time of the maximum (about 9am local solar time). The plot you posted looked like that phase was several hours off between obs and model.

I expect what you're seeing on some of the broadening of the maximum is due to atmospheric tides, although I don't know which one for sure without checking. You can see that quite clearly in the Pathfinder data. The curious sharp "notch" at ~2100 each day I can't explain off the top of my head...
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mars loon
post Aug 22 2012, 03:47 PM
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here's our mosaic of Curiosity taking aim at Mount Sharp with her robotic arm; by Ken Kremer and Marco Di Lorenzo - kindly published at NBC News.com by Alan Boyle on Aug 22, 2012. It was the main photo on the front page top of NBC News.com overnight (see below)- still there as a smaller version now :
http://photoblog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/08...ars-destination

Attached Image


composite of navcams from sols 2, 12 and 14


Attached Image


Ken Kremer

....
kenkremer.com
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chris
post Aug 22 2012, 04:28 PM
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First drive images are down http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/pr...FHAZ00302M_.JPG

Edit: replaced image with link
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Stu
post Aug 22 2012, 04:54 PM
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Thanks to Paolo for agreeing to be email interviewed for my "Gale Gazette" blog...

http://galegazette.wordpress.com/2012/08/2...o-drive-on-mars

Some very useful info and insights as usual Paolo, thanks! smile.gif


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pmetschan
post Aug 22 2012, 05:05 PM
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Looks like that rock was indeed under the wheel but looks like it was behind the left back as opposed to what I originally thought (under right back)

Did they do a complete 180 here? I'm a little bit confused on the rovers new orientation.
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Tesheiner
post Aug 22 2012, 06:17 PM
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Here's a very crude navcam mosaic and a polar view.
Attached Image

Attached Image

QUOTE (pmetschan @ Aug 22 2012, 07:05 PM) *
Did they do a complete 180 here? I'm a little bit confused on the rovers new orientation.

Looks like a forward drive, followed by a 90-120deg. clockwise turn-in-place and a backwards move.
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