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SDO, (Solar Dynamics Observatory)
Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 4 2010, 11:02 AM
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So it's fingers crossed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory, destined to help the predictions of "space weather".
SDO promises to become an exciting mission as an orbiting solar observatory with multiple high-definition telescopes has never been attempted before… cool.gif

The prelaunch readiness press conference will be held at 1 p.m. EST, on Monday, 8th February 2010 from the Kennedy Space Center News Center. It will be immediately followed by the SDO science briefing, both briefings will be
broadcast live on NASA Television. Launch is set for 9th February 2010 (10:30 – 11:30 a.m. EST).
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Feb 4 2010, 02:10 PM
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Unfortunately we wont have realtime images like we have with SOHO
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djellison
post Feb 4 2010, 02:17 PM
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At 130Mbps - we'd struggle to keep up, and to establish and maintain an internet server platform to host that content would be an epic, and expensive challenge.
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helvick
post Feb 4 2010, 04:41 PM
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That's a couple of Petabyte's per annum once you factor in the need to keep the raw data and have the space for a couple of derived products for each image. Even if they decide to release jpg's in a manner similar to the MER releases we won't be having a Midnight Sol Browser downloading all of those to our PC's anytime soon. smile.gif
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Feb 4 2010, 05:36 PM
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One per hour would be ok
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Ron Hobbs
post Feb 10 2010, 01:02 AM
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nprev,

I think you are going to love SDO as well. I watched the pre-launch science briefing this morning, and it is a damn powerful observatory. And of course we will still be getting data from STEREO.

I think we are going to learn a lot about our nearest star.

Ron
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Explorer1
post Feb 15 2010, 01:22 AM
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So when does the mission officially begin? They've launched successfully, and have to maneuver into a better orbit, but how long until the firehose opens up? I hope they follow the HiRise team's lead....
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Feb 15 2010, 07:58 AM
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April I think
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Ron Hobbs
post Feb 15 2010, 04:37 PM
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Hmmm. The SDO Mission website is down. I hope that is not a bad sign. They will probably get it back online after the holiday here.

Pertinent to this thread, one of the people on the Scientific Briefing last week commented that they were hoping to get SDO in orbit at solar minimum so they could follow an entire solar cycle. They were quite delighted that the Sun had "cooperated" by delaying its exit from minimum.

BTW, the briefing materials are here. There are some pretty cool graphics there.
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Feb 15 2010, 08:16 PM
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QUOTE (Ron Hobbs @ Feb 15 2010, 04:37 PM) *
Hmmm. The SDO Mission website is down. I hope that is not a bad sign.


It's been off for a few days now.
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Explorer1
post Feb 16 2010, 03:52 AM
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"It will take about 3 weeks to circularize SDO's orbit and another month to test the spacecraft and check out the science instruments. We will see first light in about 60 days"

From a new blog post on TPS. Doing well so far....
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Ron Hobbs
post Feb 16 2010, 05:19 PM
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The Planetary Society blog was written by fellow Solar System Ambassador Ken Kremer and is certainly worth a read.

SDO is being described as "the crown jewel" of Solar observatory missions. As part of their outreach, National Air and Space Museum (and another museum whose name I don't remember) will have big flat screens showing the near real time images of the Sun. (1.5 terabytes/day will be coming down to the ground.)

You know, I think we are going to need an SDO thread.
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Guest_PhilCo126_*
post Feb 20 2010, 11:08 AM
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SDO website s back online with news that on February 17, 2010 the observatory completed the first of 9 main engine burns that will raise the spacecraft from 2500 Km into its final geosynchronous orbit at 36000 Km...
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Guest_Sunspot_*
post Mar 17 2010, 08:05 AM
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SDO is on Station

Tue, 16 Mar

The third Trim Motor Firing (TMF #3) was successfully completed Tuesday evening. This apogee burn raised our perigee to geosynchronous with an orbital period of one day.

SDO is on station, next is to start up the instruments!
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kwan3217
post Mar 17 2010, 09:46 PM
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For part the way up, one channel of the EVE instrument was on. All the doors and filters were closed, though which means that its measurement was uncorrupted by light.

Every time the spacecraft went through perigee, the signal on that channel spiked by a factor of 10. The first perigee was less than 1 hour after we turned the EVE electronics on. It was kind of scary watching it the first time, wondering if it would ever turn around. We recognized almost immediately that we were seeing the protons of the inner Van Allen belt. Our instrument is relatively well shielded against the electrons of the outer belt, but we could (just barely) see that belt also.

Now EVE is an ultraviolet instrument, not a radiation instrument, and is not calibrated to do an actual radiation measurement. We can't say that a particular measurement represents so many particle hits per second, particle energy, particle type, or really anything other than we got higher counts here than there. But it does make an interesting map.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA4Y4kSzGNE
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