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Chang'e 4 farside landing mission
Phil Stooke
post Jun 6 2017, 04:15 PM
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Chang'E 4 landing site:



https://www.chinaspaceflight.com/satellite/.../CE-4/CE-4.html


Landing area - 45.5 degrees south latitude, 178 degrees east longitude

This is on the flat floor of the large crater Von Karman, with a bit of ejecta from the relatively young crater Finsen. Until now most indications had been for a landing near the Apollo basin at about 42 south, 157 west (203 east).


Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Jun 11 2017, 08:24 PM
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Here's a couple of maps showing the CE4 area.

Phil

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antipode
post Jun 12 2017, 04:37 AM
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Phil

I take it Von Karman's walls are sufficiently lofty to be visible in any surface imagery taken from inside that box?

p
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Explorer1
post Jun 12 2017, 05:35 AM
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I wouldn't be so sure; the horizon is really close in the Chang'E 3 surface images. We shouldn't expect huge vistas anymore than we get them on Mars; cool terrain is by definition hazardous!
I would welcome being pleasant surprised to see anything more than a few km away, of course.
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Phil Stooke
post Jun 12 2017, 05:16 PM
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Short answer - I think some relief will be visible. Von Karman is about 3500 m deep and some distant topography should show up.

I will post something on the Chang'E 3 thread about distant topography. There are distant hills to the north and west at distances of 10 to 15 km, protruding above closer topography. To the east the horizon is about 4 km from the lander.

Phil

EDIT: OK, I posted in the other thread. That was a very flat site, but local high spots can be seen about 10 km away. I would expect that either the central peak of Von Karman or the SE wall of the crater should be visible from the lander, and possibly both will be, as well as small crater rims closer to the landing site. Not high mountains like Taurus-Littrow, but distant features should be visible, appearing as low hills.


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 6 2017, 06:01 PM
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More information on site selection for CE4. This image:

https://www.chinaspaceflight.com/usr/upload...53834140857.jpg

from this site:

https://www.chinaspaceflight.com/satellite/.../CE-4/CE-4.html

shows a number of sites at about 45 degrees north or south. I am preparing something on this topic, so I will post a map later. Some sites are in mare-type areas of the SPA basin or the large craters in that area, but the northern sites are all in or between large craters in the highlands (Mare Moscoviense is not one of these areas).

This is from a presentation at the German Aerospace Centre DLR, where China and Germany have just agreed to cooperate on the mission, Germany joining several other countries.

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Jul 7 2017, 12:22 AM
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Here is a map of those sites from the slide linked to above.

Phil

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JRehling
post Jul 7 2017, 01:32 AM
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Probably everyone knows this, but on the Moon, the horizon is inherently closer than from a similar vantage point on Earth or Mars. Though the bowl of a crater may make the global curvature locally moot.
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Phil Stooke
post Jul 7 2017, 06:00 PM
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That's true, of course, but the distance to the ideal horizon is not as important as the height and distance of significant relief features. Von Karman is about 160 km across and up to 4 km deep (wall height varies quite a bit). A good comparison might be with Flamsteed P, the flooded crater which Surveyor 1 landed in. It is 80 km across, but mostly filled with lava and with hills 1500 m high protruding above the plains. Hills 20 km away were visible in the Surveyor 1 panorama. Scaling up, I am confident there will be some relief on the CE4 horizon. Maybe if the landing is in exactly the worst place for viewing relief there would not be much, but from many areas some features will be visible.

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Feb 27 2018, 07:49 PM
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The Von Karman site may not be the final word on site selection... it was identified in a paper in 2017, but two papers by Jia et al. in 2018 (one in the Chinese Journal for Deep Space Exploration, the other in Planetary and Space Science, essentially the same content) prefer the site numbered S5 in the map a few posts above. It is south of the Apollo basin and closer to the centre of the SPA basin than any other of those mapped sites. I think all we have right now is competing suggestions, and the final target may still be uncertain.

Phil



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Phil Stooke
post Mar 18 2018, 06:09 PM
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I'm at the Microsymposium just prior to LPSC. It just concluded, with presentations on the Chang'E program and others. Specifically for this thread, Von Karman seemed to be the likely site again - Apollo was promoted as a good site but probably for a future mission.

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Apr 11 2018, 05:10 PM
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Suggest a name for the CE4 relay satellite:

http://www.nssc.cas.cn/tzgg2015/tzgg_tzgg/...29_4987980.html

(Google translation)

Concerning the notification of the recruitment of the No. 4 relay star name
Article Source: Release Time:2018-03-29
All relevant units:

  The fourth relay satellite will be launched in May 2018. Considering that the No. 4 mission will be the biggest bright spot in China's aerospace field in 2018, to further establish a good image of the lunar exploration project and expand the influence of the project, the Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center plans to use the project implementation unit as the main target for solicitation of No. 4 Relay star name.

  The No. 4 relay star name collection activity will take place from March 27 to April 15, 2018. The names so collected should reflect the theme of lunar exploration, have innovative and significant technological and cultural characteristics, be positive, and conform to the socialist core values.

  Specially invited your organization to participate in this solicitation. Please refer to the attachment for specific requirements.

  Attachment: Program for Selection of Relay No. 4 Relay Stars

  Moon Exploration and Aerospace Engineering Center

  March 27, 2018


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Phil Stooke
post Apr 22 2018, 06:20 PM
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This link is to the current issue of China's Journal of Deep Space Exploration:

http://jdse.bit.edu.cn/sktcxben/ch/reader/issue_list.aspx

A very interesting set of papers about the CE4 landing site including several suggestions for landing sites and even rover traverse routes. Chinese language with English abstract, but Google document translation will help, and the illustrations carry a lot of information even without translation. Many of these papers will probably appear in English elsewhere at a later date. I can feel a map coming on...

Phil


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Phil Stooke
post Apr 23 2018, 11:48 PM
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After a suitable gestation period, here is a map of the sites suggested for Chang'E 4 in Von Karman crater. The references are from the previous post except the mention of Snape et al. (2010) which is an LPSC abstract, easy to search for if you need it. THe bottom map includes possible traverses suggested by Mou et al. (2018)

Phil

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Phil Stooke
post Apr 24 2018, 02:38 AM
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http://news.cnstock.com/news,bwkx-201804-4214240.htm

Google translate:

China Securities News reported on April 24 from the National Bureau of Science, Technology, and Technology that during the opening ceremony of the "China Aerospace Day" home event in 2018, Wu Yanhua said that the Chang'e 4 is one of the major tasks for China's space industry this year...

Wu Yanhua announced at the opening ceremony that the No. 4 relay star was named "Bianqiao" and the two small satellites were named "Longjiang No. 1" and "Longjiang No. 2".

Phil


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