IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

16 Pages V  « < 14 15 16  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Nasa announces new rover mission to Mars in 2020
Explorer1
post May 11 2018, 09:16 PM
Post #226


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1551
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



Helicopter confirmed for the payload: https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/mars-hel...t-rover-mission
Looks like deployment will be from the belly of the rover body. Just release, and then drive off to a safe distance?

Obviously some benefits to the Dragonfly Titan proposal in terms of getting experience with autonomous rotor-driven spacecraft, (thought liftoff on Titan would be a lot easier!) but also just plain cool! Selfies will be a lot easier to plan too...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mcaplinger
post May 11 2018, 11:06 PM
Post #227


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1748
Joined: 13-September 05
Member No.: 497



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ May 11 2018, 01:16 PM) *
Obviously some benefits to the Dragonfly Titan proposal in terms of getting experience with autonomous rotor-driven spacecraft...

I think you overestimate the level of cooperation and information flow between JPL and APL, even if the two vehicles had much in common other than having rotors.


--------------------
Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post May 12 2018, 01:49 AM
Post #228


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1551
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



That's true, and obviously there are many differences; one has to use its rotors for EDL in addition to the prime mission, carry scientific instruments, all after a multi-year cruise, while the other is a tech demonstration piggy-backing on another mission, and its own success or failure does not impact the 2020 Rover's objectives.
I was just thinking in terms of "space is space". Whether half an hour signal delay or several hours, neither will be controlled in real time by anything but an onboard computer, with really thin margins on mass and power. JAXA and NASA have cooperated on their respective asteroid sample return missions, (which are coincidentally flying at the same time), and there are some rather large differences between them. But anyway, this is mostly academic for now; looking forward to the Mars microphone picking up the whirr of the blades (3000 RPM!)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Steve G
post May 12 2018, 02:26 AM
Post #229


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 161
Joined: 29-December 05
From: Edmonton, AB
Member No.: 624



Please tell me they're fitting a camera on the helicopter.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post May 12 2018, 02:53 AM
Post #230


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1551
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



QUOTE (Steve G @ May 11 2018, 09:26 PM) *
Please tell me they're fitting a camera on the helicopter.

Yes, this is the main point of the demonstration; being able to scout terrain ahead, with higher resolution than orbital imagery, both for engineering (planning safe drive routes) and science (spotting things too small for HiRise or not in line-of-sight to the rover).
Being able to inspect the entire rover is an obvious plus, (if they are permitted to fly close enough to avoid being a hazard)*, though I'm sure many EDL team members would like to see how their hardware fared too! With Curiosity pretty much everything fell into local low points in the terrain, and we never saw the heatshield, backshell, parachute, or skycrane from the ground. Mind, the current plan is for only 30 days of operations, it's not apparently planned to 'tag along' for the main mission.

Edit: *a bit tongue in cheek Mike! wink.gif The forward facing camera would be plenty adequate for a distance view!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mcaplinger
post May 12 2018, 03:29 AM
Post #231


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1748
Joined: 13-September 05
Member No.: 497



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ May 11 2018, 06:53 PM) *
Being able to inspect the entire rover is an obvious plus, (if they are permitted to fly close enough to avoid being a hazard)

No freakin' way.


--------------------
Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monty python
post May 13 2018, 06:52 AM
Post #232


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 152
Joined: 2-March 06
Member No.: 692



I just fell on the floor laughing!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
anticitizen2
post May 31 2018, 06:50 PM
Post #233


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 195
Joined: 16-December 13
Member No.: 7067



JPL was concerned enough about the helicopter interface potentially taking down the rover that they gave that design to the Lockheed Martin Space avionics team. Our best engineer is working it, so Iíve been looking over his shoulder at the design.
I assumed there would be no moving parts in the deployment, but apparently the helicopter is held sideways against the belly, and then rotated 90 deg to vertical for deployment. I guess that makes sense on more consideration, this thing isnít going to be THAT small, but I still donít have a sense of scale between the two vehicles, how much clearance the stowed helicopter is going to get.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Explorer1
post May 31 2018, 08:03 PM
Post #234


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1551
Joined: 13-February 10
From: Ontario
Member No.: 5221



The new upgraded skycrane landing system should be able to avoid any unlucky rock sticking up, from what I recall?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mcaplinger
post Jun 1 2018, 12:55 AM
Post #235


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1748
Joined: 13-September 05
Member No.: 497



QUOTE (Explorer1 @ May 31 2018, 12:03 PM) *
The new upgraded skycrane landing system should be able to avoid any unlucky rock sticking up, from what I recall?

There's no active hazard avoidance that I'm aware of. There's TRN but that still requires a priori knowledge of hazards from pre-existing orbital imagery. See https://marsnext.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/201...straints_v6.pdf


--------------------
Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PDP8E
post Jun 16 2018, 06:48 PM
Post #236


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 602
Joined: 10-October 06
From: Maynard Mass USA
Member No.: 1241



Here is a nice technical write-up of the Mars Helicopter

https://rotorcraft.arc.nasa.gov/Publication...AA2018_0023.pdf

Two Cameras!



--------------------
CLA CLL
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
nprev
post Jun 22 2018, 05:31 AM
Post #237


Senior Member
****

Group: Admin
Posts: 8110
Joined: 8-December 05
From: Los Angeles
Member No.: 602



Helicopter test in simulated Mars surface atmosphere at JPL.

That's very impressive, esp. considering that they can't simulate 0.38g. smile.gif


--------------------
A few will take this knowledge and use this power of a dream realized as a force for change, an impetus for further discovery to make less ancient dreams real.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

16 Pages V  « < 14 15 16
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 25th September 2018 - 09:35 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.