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Rev 203, Mar 24 - Apr 27 '14
Val Klavans
post Apr 16 2014, 12:26 AM
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Another pale blue dot: On April 11, 2014 ISS observed Uranus as it appeared near Saturn's F ring!

Right after the raw images came in, Ian R and I put together this RGB color composite (we chose the set of raws with longer exposures to make Uranus more visible):

Attached Image


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Val Klavans
Co-Producer of In Saturn's Rings | Space Image Processor | Astronomy Communicator | Guitarist
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Ian R
post Apr 16 2014, 12:32 AM
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I have to say that Val did a great job of employing this composite for outreach purposes, disseminating it via the likes of Facebook and Twitter to a very positive reaction. cool.gif


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nprev
post Apr 16 2014, 01:00 AM
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Just out of curiosity, does anybody know what the apparent magnitude of Uranus was from Cassini in this shot? I can't see it ever getting brighter than, say, 4.5 or so even during the most favorable possible opposition.


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djellison
post Apr 16 2014, 03:44 AM
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QUOTE (nprev @ Apr 15 2014, 05:00 PM) *
Just out of curiosity, does anybody know what the apparent magnitude of Uranus was from Cassini in this shot? I can't see it ever getting brighter than, say, 4.5 or so even during the most favorable possible opposition.


Dimmer than Uranus as seen from the earth - approx 6.7 according to Horizons ( http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/ ) - because right now Saturn and Uranus are on opposite sides of the solar system


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wildespace
post Feb 21 2017, 09:14 AM
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Taken by Cassini's wide-angle camera on April 4th 2014, this great view of Saturn in infrared:

Attached Image


I used two images (W00088137 and W00088136) for the red and blue channels, creating a fake green channel by averaging the two images. I then used this excellent image from a JPL article to superimpose my colour image over.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Maksim Kakitsev


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