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Philae Wakes Up!
0101Morpheus
post Jun 14 2015, 02:42 PM
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This accomplishment is on par with landing Shoemaker on Eros for me.
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Ron Hobbs
post Jun 14 2015, 03:08 PM
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ESA scientist Mark McCaughrean told the BBC: "It's been a long seven months, and to be quite honest we weren't sure it would happen - there are a lot of very happy people around Europe at the moment."

Quote from the BBC: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-33126885
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scalbers
post Jun 14 2015, 03:29 PM
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Judging from this CNN story, the 24 watts we heard represents a good power margin. "Months after Philae nodded off, lander system engineer Laurence O'Rourke told CNN that Philae needed almost 6 watts of power to reboot itself, 9 watts to accept communications and 19 watts to allow two-way communication with the orbiter."

I would infer it could have rebooted and been receiving commands for a long time.


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Paolo
post Jun 14 2015, 03:53 PM
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I don't know what to make of it. an Italian news site (one of the few which is known for fact checking and reliability) is reporting words from one of the engineers responsible for Philae (for SD2, I suppose) that the lander "was not where we were looking for it"
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Gerald
post Jun 14 2015, 04:08 PM
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That's supergreat news! 24 W sounds very good. Might even be sufficient to load the battery later, near perihelion.
I hope, the instruments survived the deep temperatures. Can't wait for more data about the health of all systems.
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vikingmars
post Jun 14 2015, 04:30 PM
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QUOTE (climber @ Jun 14 2015, 01:05 PM) *
Got the info from a Radio that CNES get a 2mn contact with Philae last nigth and 40 second of data.
Please take this info with due precautions waiting for confirmation before opening a new topic.
http://tempsreel.nouvelobs.com/en-direct/a...-spatiales.html

Thanks a lot Climber.
CNES (Marc Pircher, CNES Director at Toulouse Flight Center) added this afternoon that those 1st 40 sec of data was the one that Philae has still in its memory and that was planned to be downloaded.
The downloading will take no less than 10 days to be completed.
Then and only then, they will be able to send commands to Philae for new instructions.
They added that they will try to move it somewhat in order that it is able to sample the surface of 67-P, BUT they will have to be very careful in instructing it to move because in its current position one of its leg is still oriented upwards with no contact on the surface of 67-P and they don't want it to tilt over because this would ruin its mission... wheel.gif
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anticitizen2
post Jun 14 2015, 04:30 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Jun 14 2015, 11:53 AM) *
..reporting words from one of the engineers responsible for Philae (for SD2, I suppose) that the lander "was not where we were looking for it"

To add to this- tweeted by Francesco Topputo who was involved during the FSS (and possibly beyond, not sure of his position)

"So, it seems now we have a rover on the comet, not a lander."
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centsworth_II
post Jun 14 2015, 04:31 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Jun 14 2015, 10:53 AM) *
...the lander "was not where we were looking for it"
Maybe referring to the fact that the recent possible image of the lander was outside of the landing ellipse. If that indeed turns out to be Philae.

Oh, yeah, and Woo Hoo!!!
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SFJCody
post Jun 14 2015, 05:15 PM
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http://www.nature.com/news/philae-comet-la...=TWT_NatureNews
QUOTE
The lander team are currently trying to understand why the link-up from Philae lasted less time then they would have predicted: from a two hour window, the connection lasted only about 2 minutes. This might be due to uncertainties in Philae’s orientation, or the lander may have moved, says Geurts.


Could it be trapped in some kind of narrow crevasse?
I wonder whether crevasse or crevice is most appropriate? Guess it depends on the ratio of ice/rock!
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scalbers
post Jun 14 2015, 05:26 PM
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QUOTE (Harder @ Jun 14 2015, 01:50 PM) *
The backlog of data packets also gives some confidence that the lander is regularly awake and capable to continue its unique mission. Maybe this will trigger a change in the Rosetta-comet geometry to maximize interaction with Philae?

Yes this is possible, and in the shorter term Rosetta will be pointing more directly at Philae as mentioned near the bottom of the above mentioned Nature story.


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Habukaz
post Jun 14 2015, 05:36 PM
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QUOTE
Assuming the connection with Philae reopens, the first science in coming days will likely be low risk activities, he says, such as taking images and turning on the ROMAP instrument, which measures the comet’s magnetic field.


More images soon? I like the sound of that. smile.gif


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Explorer1
post Jun 14 2015, 05:44 PM
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Fantastic news to wake up to! It should be pretty trivial to nail down a final location, right? (i.e. confirming the object in the images is our trusty friend).
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vikingmars
post Jun 14 2015, 05:53 PM
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QUOTE (Habukaz @ Jun 14 2015, 07:36 PM) *
More images soon? I like the sound of that. smile.gif

As CNES said today, no taking of new images in the coming days :
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&p=221280
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Habukaz
post Jun 14 2015, 05:57 PM
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Yes, I read that. The order and priority of things is what interested me.


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Harder
post Jun 14 2015, 06:22 PM
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Vikingmars, did you perhaps watch the 20:00 TF1 news? Monsieur Le Gall was announced but I can't pick up TF1 to hear what he has to say, so much for my "TripleSat" antenna dish!
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