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Rosetta PDS, Images and other products made from archived data
machi
post Dec 24 2015, 12:55 AM
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Thanks Björn!

There is basic info about that image in the Flickr page.
I used red, green and near UV filters
so it's slightly extended beyond human vision capability but it does not use whole spectral capabilities of OSIRIS NAC camera.



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Bjorn Jonsson
post Dec 27 2015, 11:25 PM
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This is a wonderful data set. Having at first spent some time fixing IMG2PNG I now have flipped through all of the September 2014 NAC images. Here is a quick and dirty version of image N20140910T161923332ID30F22.IMG (there's more to come later):

Attached Image


Since this is a 16 bit data set the dynamic range is high. It turns out that many images contain lots of details in the shadowed regions. The image above has been processed to reveal details in the shadowed regions (they were almost black in the original image) without losing significant amounts of contrast in the bright regions. Had the source image been an 8 bit image there would have been only three levels of gray in the shadowed regions.


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elakdawalla
post Dec 28 2015, 10:21 PM
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This is not technically PDS data, but is relevant to work people are doing here. I've been provided two lists of navigational data (attached):
- a list of all of the OCMs performed to date by Rosetta. It lists start and stop times but these are not the exact burn start and stop times; they are the full lengths of the periods set aside for OCM activities, including slews, pointing, margin, etc.
- a zip file containing Rosetta altitude information at a 1-minute resolution from June 1, 2014 to December 17, 2015.
I'll find some way to add this to my index pages, but thought the raw data might come in handy to some of you, or that you may have some clever ideas for how to visualize it.
Attached File(s)
Attached File  OCM_list.dat.txt ( 18.27K ) Number of downloads: 88
Attached File  rosetta_altitude.zip ( 4.58MB ) Number of downloads: 86
 


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Bjorn Jonsson
post Jan 2 2016, 08:56 PM
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Here is a false color view processed to show color/compositional differences:

Attached Image


This is from images N20140821T154228701ID30F41.IMG, N20140821T154304911ID30F23.IMG and N20140821T154327701ID30F16.IMG. Here near-IR, green and near-UV are displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. Color saturation has been greatly exaggerated to show color/compositional variations. Due to the relative motion between the spacecraft and the comet while the images were obtained I had to warp the near-IR and near-UV images to register them to the green image. This was not quite sufficient to get nice results at the shadow edges so I blurred the resulting color image (in effect reducing its resolution by a factor of ~5) and then pasted the color from the blurred image into the green image. Some color artifacts are still visible near the shadows but they are greatly reduced and all of the large scale color variations and color variations in areas far from shadows are real.

And here is an anaglyph from images N20140914T210304360ID30F22.IMG and N20140914T210355741ID30F41.IMG:

Attached Image


This is a wonderful data set for producing spectacular anaglyphs. There are many tens of possible anaglyphs 'lurking' in the collection of IMG files.

Here is another one. Not quite as spectacular but it has been processed to reveal jets of material at the limb and also to show the comet's shadowed limb. This is from images N20140914T202748367ID30F22.IMG and N20140914T202839748ID30F41.IMG:

Attached Image
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elakdawalla
post May 5 2016, 03:33 AM
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I can't believe that no one has posted about this yet

http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2016/05/04/os...ander-delivery/

I've downloaded all the WAC data and am almost done with the NAC; I'm exercising the new version of IMG2PNG and will have browse pages with metadata and filter information available as soon as I can.


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jccwrt
post May 5 2016, 05:30 AM
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Not quite sure where on 67P this was taken. I wanna say Serqet.



This is a four-frame mosaic taken through the OSIRIS NAC on October 14, 2014 at a distance of around 11 km.

EDIT: some more mosaics and stuff

Two frame mosaic from October 5, 2014, distance 18.79 km


Four frame mosaic from December 13, 2014, distance 19.20 km



And a few wiggle gifs to show topography. (These are around 6 mb apiece, so I'll just leave a link for slow connections)

September 30. 2014. Parallax was from 12 minutes of spacecraft motion. Altitude 18.10 km

October 1, 2014. Parallax was from 11 minutes of spacecraft motion. Altitude 18.20 km

November 12, 2014. You can see Philae heading in for a landing if you look carefully! Parallax was from 5 minutes of spacecraft motion
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elakdawalla
post May 6 2016, 06:26 PM
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BEHOLD. Rosetta OSIRIS and Navcam data for:

Far Approach Trajectory (July 2-August 6, 2014)
Close Approach Trajectory (August 6-September 10, 2014)
Global Mapping Phase (September 10-October 15, 2014)
Close Observation Phase (October 15-31, 2014)
Lander Delivery Phase (October 31-November 21, 2014)
Escort Phase (November 21, 2014-)

New stuff begins at the end of the Global Mapping Phase. I'm likely to be making slight tweaks to these pages but all the data are linked. Have at it!

EDIT: I have trouble with the FTP links to IMG and LBL files from Chrome but they work for me in Firefox.


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katodomo
post May 8 2016, 09:17 AM
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All 1147 OSIRIS pictures of the escort phase were taken up until December 19, 2014 (one month after lander delivery).

The Escort Phase (MTP10+) by ESA nomenclature ended on December 31st, 2015 due to nominal mission end and was succeeded by the Extension Phase (MTP25+). The latest NAVCAM pictures of the Extension Phase released in the archive are from February 10th, 2016.
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Herobrine
post May 10 2016, 04:25 PM
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Here's my quick attempt at spotting Philae during its descent in the newly-released OSIRIS NAC data.
Attached Image
Probably didn't get all of the NAC frames with it, but that's most of them. It's enlarged 3x here with no interpolation. I used the PNGs on Planetary's site for this one. Normally, I'd use the IMGs from PSA, but I was just throwing it together for my own amusement.

Also, here. People seemed to like this kind of thing in the past.
These are mostly 8-20 minute time-steps, so they lack some of the feeling-like-you're-there quality the one I posted a while back had; that one had (I think) 1 minute time-steps. I did use the PSA data for these.
Click on the animations below for full-size versions (they're enormous).
2014-11-22
Attached Image

2014-11-24
Attached Image

2014-11-28
Attached Image
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nprev
post May 11 2016, 03:43 AM
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ohmy.gif ...absolutely gob-smacking, as they say. That's truly stunning work, Hero; thank you!!! smile.gif


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Sean
post May 11 2016, 03:56 PM
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Herobrine is my hero!


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Paolo
post Jun 28 2016, 04:15 PM
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new image release.
be sure to check out the shadow sequence!
http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2016/06/28/os...g-shadow-flyby/
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chuck0
post Oct 1 2016, 11:29 AM
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Not sure if anybody has bothered to do this up til now, but i wrote a little tool to create 32bit floatingpoint greyscale tiff files from the original osiris IMG files in order to get the full dynamic range stored in there (they also use floats...). Though i am not sure if there is more information than in the 16bit png files. If there is interest in playing with this i can clean the code up a little and post a link.

Attached a few quick and dirty images where i tried to pull stuff out of the shadows smile.gif

I wonder if it is possible to use the calibration images in the database to get rid of som of the banding artefacts in there







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JohnVV
post Oct 1 2016, 07:49 PM
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hi chuck0

nice images

i take to you are not aware that GDAL can convert pds img/lbl files to a geotiff
an example
CODE
gdal_translate ros_cam1_20160810t015931.lbl ros_cam1_20160810t015931.tiff

http://sbn.pds.nasa.gov/holdings/ro-c-navc...v1.0/data/cam1/

from the label
CODE
/***      IMAGE DESCRIPTION                                               ***/
OBJECT                         = IMAGE                                        
   DERIVED_MAXIMUM             = 4095                                        
   DERIVED_MINIMUM             = 177                                          
   LINES                       = 1024                                        
   LINE_SAMPLES                = 1024                                        
   SAMPLE_TYPE                 = LSB_UNSIGNED_INTEGER                        
   SAMPLE_BITS                 = 16                                          
   SOURCE_SAMPLE_BITS          = 12                                          
   SAMPLE_DISPLAY_DIRECTION    = "RIGHT"                                      
   LINE_DISPLAY_DIRECTION      = "UP"                                        
END_OBJECT                     = IMAGE

a 12 bit image converted to 16 bit
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chuck0
post Oct 2 2016, 12:10 AM
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Thanks for pointing me to this tool! Though since geotiffs (and the pngs in the archive) are 16bit greyscales and the original data in the IMG files is 32bit float greyscale i wasnt sure whether some of the information is being lost by doing this conversion... but after looking at quite a few of the images i converted it seems like they just chose 32 bit floats in the IMG files in order to actually store the data in its correct physical units. So a 32bit conversion is not really useful anyways and i would have been better off simply using the publicly available png files wacko.gif

Anyways, it was a nice exercise in getting to know the image data format they are using smile.gif
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