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Lucy, Discovery Mission 13 - a grand tour of the Jupiter Trojans
Floyd
post Oct 31 2021, 03:35 PM
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With the low cost and weight of small cameras, I'm surprised there were not two cameras dedicated to viewing the solar arrays and documenting their deployment.


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mcaplinger
post Oct 31 2021, 05:17 PM
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QUOTE (Floyd @ Oct 31 2021, 08:35 AM) *
With the low cost and weight of small cameras, I'm surprised there were not two cameras dedicated to viewing the solar arrays and documenting their deployment.

The overall system cost is probably not as low as you think, and it's not at all clear that documenting the deployment would help you fix a problem. Without knowing the details of the system it's impossible to know. There's more than enough poorly-informed discussion of this at the link I provided above.

If you want small space-rated cameras we would be happy to sell you some, and in fact there are two on Lucy: https://www.msss.com/news/index.php?id=131


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JRehling
post Oct 31 2021, 09:10 PM
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I don't have the software to turn that kernel data into the flyby specifics, but I'll emphasize that it seems unlikely that a best-case scenario for ground imaging would occur.

If it did, I still maintain that decimeter-scale resolution is possible, at least if we were trying to determine the degree that the solar array had deployed, from a continuum of known possibilities. Measuring the separation between two linear features measuring many pixels long allows for much greater accuracy than trying to image an unknown object. It would be quite similar to the situation where Vernier acuity is measured. As the Wikipedia article (accurately) states, "vernier acuity exceeds acuity by far."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernier_acuity

Here is an image of the ISS that approaches the best case resolution. As a comparison, this telescope has something like 3x the aperture of HiRise, which images subjects 300 km away.

https://m.facebook.com/MilroyCoonabarabran/...8555909/?type=3

But, again, there's no reason other than hope that a single opportunity would achieve results like the best of virtually unlimited opportunities to image the ISS. I don't predict a productive outcome for such an effort.
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bobik
post Nov 8 2021, 07:14 AM
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QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Oct 31 2021, 06:17 PM) *
The overall system cost is probably not as low as you think, and it's not at all clear that documenting the deployment would help you fix a problem.

Is that so? The BepiColombo project added 3 small monitoring cameras to a completely integrated spacecraft less than two years before launch, and ESA - especially ESA's Science Programme isn't known for swimming in money. Yes, however, 20 percent uncertainty of the deployment state doesn't help to fix or assess the problem either.
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mcaplinger
post Nov 8 2021, 06:14 PM
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QUOTE (bobik @ Nov 7 2021, 11:14 PM) *
The BepiColombo project added 3 small monitoring cameras to a completely integrated spacecraft less than two years before launch, and ESA - especially ESA's Science Programme isn't known for swimming in money.

Unless you can produce an actual cost figure then this is at best circumstantial. I have a pretty good idea of how much it would have cost on Lucy, but can't discuss specifics.

This is all 20-20 hindsight. What I don't know is how much telemetry of the array state they get. Obviously they weren't expecting a problem.


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Marcin600
post Nov 19 2021, 12:47 AM
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"...The test data and findings suggest the lanyard may not have wound on the spool as intended. Testing continues to determine what caused this outcome, and a range of scenarios are possible. The team isn’t planning to attempt to move or further characterize the current state of the solar array deployment before Wednesday, Dec. 1, at the earliest."
"...Checkouts for the Lucy instruments were successfully completed Nov. 8, and all instruments are working normally..."

https://blogs.nasa.gov/lucy/2021/11/18/lucy...-checkout-a-ok/

https://twitter.com/NASASolarSystem/status/...393961629757450
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