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Jupiter Saturn Conjunction, Giant planets that pass in the night
JRehling
post Dec 22 2020, 05:59 AM
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I assume that anybody here has heard about this by now. It's still a worthwhile sight in the evenings to come. I got photos of it on the three nights of closest approach, and by mixing in a long exposure for Saturn's moons (counterclockwise: Rhea, Tethys, Dione, Titan) with various exposures for other bodies, I got this photo with ten solar system bodies. A dim random star sidled alongside Ganymede.

Here is my best image, and an animation of the trio.
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vikingmars
post Dec 22 2020, 02:55 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Dec 22 2020, 06:59 AM) *
I assume that anybody here has heard about this by now. It's still a worthwhile sight in the evenings to come. I got photos of it on the three nights of closest approach, and by mixing in a long exposure for Saturn's moons (counterclockwise: Rhea, Tethys, Dione, Titan) with various exposures for other bodies, I got this photo with ten solar system bodies. A dim random star sidled alongside Ganymede.

Here is my best image, and an animation of the trio.


WOW ! Congratulations for your nice pictures smile.gif
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Xerxes
post Dec 22 2020, 04:59 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Dec 22 2020, 12:59 AM) *
A dim random star sidled alongside Ganymede.


I also saw that star in my shots of the event, and it turns out to be a bit more interesting than just a random star. It's HIP 99314, and it was occulted by both Ganymede and Jupiter on the night of Dec 20-21: http://www.harvestmoonorchard.com/astro/oc...14_summary.html
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Explorer1
post Dec 22 2020, 10:08 PM
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And here's a view from the Moon, via LROC ( http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1174 )
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MahFL
post Dec 23 2020, 12:19 AM
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Here is a pic I took quite early on the 21st. 45x zoom using a 60mm spotting scope and pic snapped by IPhone 10. I seem to have caught Saturn in a very stable pocket of atmosphere. The view was much better with the naked eye, esp after the evening got darker.
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nprev
post Dec 23 2020, 07:18 AM
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The conjunction naked-eye view from downtown Los Angeles.


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JRehling
post Dec 23 2020, 09:51 AM
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Great pictures, everyone! I envy the views that some people got! It was a great reminder of how the population at large can get really excited about events like this.
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fredk
post Dec 23 2020, 07:58 PM
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It finally cleared in Vancouver Tuesday evening. I'm surprized there was some discussion about whether they'd be resolvable by eye - at 10'.5 they were easy to pick apart (even with my not-so-great eyesight) and I'm sure I could've at the minimum 6'. I guess viewing against a brightish sky helped and maybe Saturn could get lost in Jupiter's glare against a black sky?
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MahFL
post Dec 24 2020, 06:55 AM
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QUOTE (fredk @ Dec 23 2020, 07:58 PM) *
It finally cleared in Vancouver Tuesday evening. I'm surprized there was some discussion about whether they'd be resolvable by eye - at 10'.5 they were easy to pick apart (even with my not-so-great eyesight) and I'm sure I could've at the minimum 6'. I guess viewing against a brightish sky helped and maybe Saturn could get lost in Jupiter's glare against a black sky?


In reality they did not get as close together as the general media had us believe. They were always resolvable to my spectacle corrected vision.
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MahFL
post Dec 24 2020, 06:59 AM
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Next up is the Mars/Uranus conjunction on 21 Jan 2021. That will be be harder to see as Uranus is so much dimmer.
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climber
post Dec 24 2020, 01:42 PM
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That's the best I could do with poor conditions in south of France on Dec 22nd.
From left to right, Callisto, Europe, Jupiter, Io, Ganymede and...well, Saturn.
Sony Alpha 6000 200mm/F6.3 2"

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dtolman
post Dec 29 2020, 03:01 PM
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QUOTE (MahFL @ Dec 24 2020, 01:59 AM) *
Next up is the Mars/Uranus conjunction on 21 Jan 2021. That will be be harder to see as Uranus is so much dimmer.


The most exciting thing about this conjunction is that finding Uranus will be finally achievable even for those of us who don't have go-to telescopes wink.gif
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