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ExoMars - Schiaparelli landing
climber
post Oct 19 2016, 04:32 PM
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Does somebody know when Oppy's images attempt will be on the ground?


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xflare
post Oct 19 2016, 04:44 PM
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Looks like the Orbiter burn was successful - signal acquired right on time.
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nogal
post Oct 19 2016, 04:46 PM
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ExoMars TGO is now confirmed to be in martian orbit.

QUOTE (Art Martin @ Oct 19 2016, 05:06 PM) *
I have a question about this lander mission for the experts....


Hello Art Martin. I think most of your questions are answered in these ESA pages: About ExoMars
Fernando
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Explorer1
post Oct 19 2016, 05:08 PM
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Oppy's image attempt should come this afternoon, PST. Regarding the final fate of the lander, the Mars Express data is being analyzed now, and should shed light, on what occurred.

MRO imagery would of course, give the ultimate ground truth, but I don't known when that is planned for...
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PaulM
post Oct 19 2016, 05:35 PM
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QUOTE (Art Martin @ Oct 19 2016, 05:06 PM) *
I have a question about this lander mission for the experts. I was surprised to hear the lander has no solar panels, will operate briefly until batteries run out, and has no surface cameras at all, that this mission was primarily just to practice landing techniques in preparation for a future rover mission. It sure seems that these techniques have been fully developed by the US and we are having stunning successes at landing in difficult conditions and I would assume that there would be no reservations at all about sharing the technology with ESA. While I understand that ESA wants to show they can do it on their own, the costs to send a lander are astronomical and not reinventing the wheel seems to be a very logical step. Why is ESA not piggybacking off our experience more? Was this simply a situation where they had such limited payload weights available and this was some last minute addition to the ExoMars mission or did they truly need this step? I just can't fathom going to all that trouble to set something down like this and not include solar panels and a camera.

Entry descent and landing technology is classified because of its relationship with ICBM technology. This is why we were lucky to see oppy's microscopic images of her heat shield. However, you will notice that jpl have never described what the images revealed. I was surprised that communications protocols between opportunity's central computer and it's instruments were also classified. I have read that this is why opportunity's European made instruments have an analogue interface and not a digital interface to the main computer.
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mcaplinger
post Oct 19 2016, 05:49 PM
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QUOTE (PaulM @ Oct 19 2016, 09:35 AM) *
Entry descent and landing technology is classified because of its relationship with ICBM technology.

While there is some truth to this (for "classified" read "covered by ITAR"), there is plenty of open-literature information about US Mars EDL systems.


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Disclaimer: This post is based on public information only. Any opinions are my own.
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xflare
post Oct 19 2016, 06:07 PM
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According to BBCs Jonathon Amos Mars Express saw pretty much the same thing as the radio telescope.... which doesn't sound good. Perhaps something happened at backshell separation or engine ignition.
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B Bernatchez
post Oct 19 2016, 08:16 PM
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When might we get HiRise coverage of the landing zone?
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Phil Stooke
post Oct 19 2016, 09:52 PM
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Have to figure out where it is first. Tracking might help. A CTX image might be the first thing they would try, to find it for targeting HiRISE next time.

Phil


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James Sorenson
post Oct 19 2016, 10:03 PM
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There are two candidates that I spot in the Oppy images that have come down. But these really do look like CR hits to me. I wouldn't rule out the lander though. smile.gif
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...ARP2857L6M1.JPG

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...ARP2857L6M1.JPG
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Steve5304
post Oct 19 2016, 10:36 PM
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QUOTE (James Sorenson @ Oct 19 2016, 11:03 PM) *
There are two candidates that I spot in the Oppy images that have come down. But these really do look like CR hits to me. I wouldn't rule out the lander though. smile.gif
http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...ARP2857L6M1.JPG

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...ARP2857L6M1.JPG




Those definately are not cosmic Ray hits...pictures were taken some time apart and the second picture hives with the trajectory of the first that's definately the lander.
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Explorer1
post Oct 19 2016, 10:50 PM
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Flipping between the two links James posted I see something around the 9 o'clock position in the 2nd image a lot fainter than the cosmic ray hits (near the black dust spec on the lens).
I know, I know, grasping at straws, but look at my avatar, I can't help myself! wink.gif
Trouble is we can only guess what it would look like...
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tanjent
post Oct 19 2016, 11:23 PM
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Based on the shape of the landing ellipse relative to the rover's position, I would have expected the lander to move from left to right across Opportunity's field of view. The phrase "landing long" has been used to express the prerequisite for Schiaparelli's getting near Opportunity's position at all. That said, there are many possible ways to become disoriented when viewing pictures like this for the first time.
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TheAnt
post Oct 20 2016, 12:29 AM
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The second image, at top right, look a bit like a comet. Isn't that Schiaparelli?

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/opportuni...ARP2857L6M1.JPG

Last news from BBC, the same, no signal so isn't it a risk the batteries run out even if the lander mission would turn out to be retrievable after all?
Regardless, this was a crucial step for the Exomars rover, so another delay seem likely.
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fredk
post Oct 20 2016, 12:32 AM
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QUOTE (Steve5304 @ Oct 19 2016, 11:36 PM) *
Those definately are not cosmic Ray hits...

As I mentioned in the MER thread, this is daytime at Meridiani, so the exposures are very short. I wouldn't expect the lander to be streaked, especially since if anything we'd be seeing the slow end of the descent trajectory. So I think everything we see is consistent with CR's and noise.

The real clincher would be a feature appearing in simultaneous L6/R2 frames, but I don't see anything matching.
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