IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

35 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
ExoMars
SigurRosFan
post Aug 25 2005, 07:32 PM
Post #16


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 531
Joined: 24-August 05
Member No.: 471



Will SMILE fly to Mars with ESA's ExoMars??

http://66.249.93.104/search?q=cache:ayPuf8...a+exomars&hl=de


--------------------
- blue_scape / Nico -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
RNeuhaus
post Aug 25 2005, 08:02 PM
Post #17


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1636
Joined: 9-May 05
From: Lima, Peru
Member No.: 385



QUOTE
SigurRosFan(Posted Today, 02:32 PM)

The ESA Technology, Mars Organic Analyzer to detect the life in the crust is interesting but if I think that the Mars life was more than 3 thoushands millions years ago (I don't agree with billions and it means millions millions!), then the amino must be very vanished comparing to ones of Atacama Desert.

The desert Atacama was covered by ocean probably about 20-40 millions years ago. So by that land there must be some fossils and amino compositions. The north of Chile and South of Peru have one of the most dry places of the world with almost no precipitation and there have plenty of dunes on lower lands and rocky on upper land, the ladden of Andean mountain chain.

Rodolfo
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post Aug 25 2005, 08:28 PM
Post #18





Guests






One reason that NASA decided not to fly a 1-meter soil drill on MSL is that it will, in any case, carry a small drill capable of coring samples from several cm beneath the surface of sedimentary rocks -- and it is actually far likelier that ancient biochemical fossil remains can survive in those places, sealed off completely from Mars' surface oxidants, than that they can survive a meter down in its current soil.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
SigurRosFan
post Aug 25 2005, 08:44 PM
Post #19


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 531
Joined: 24-August 05
Member No.: 471



Sorry. Wrong link.

MOA will fly definitely(!) to Mars.

I mean SMILE (Specific Molecular Identification of Life Experiment).

"The criteria for ExoMars are tough. Researchers hoping to get a place on the craft have to design a device that will look for biomarkers but not exceed 3 kg in mass or measure more than 16x16x20 cm."

http://www.nature.com/materials/news/news/.../050620-15.html


--------------------
- blue_scape / Nico -
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rakhir
post Jan 31 2006, 01:25 PM
Post #20


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 370
Joined: 12-September 05
From: France
Member No.: 495



Alcatel Alenia Space starts the ExoMars mission design

http://www.alcatel.com/vpr/;jsessionid=111...equestid=451784

This contract, worth about 13 million Euros, calls for one year mission design work up to the preliminary design review including the definition of the main system elements of the mission.

EDIT : Link corrected, thanks to Vikingmars.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
vikingmars
post Jan 31 2006, 03:05 PM
Post #21


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 813
Joined: 19-February 05
From: Close to Meudon Observatory in France
Member No.: 172



smile.gif Here is the missing link :
http://www.alcatel.com/vpr/;jsessionid=111...equestid=451784

QUOTE (Rakhir @ Jan 31 2006, 02:25 PM)
Alcatel Alenia Space starts the ExoMars mission design

http://www.alcatel.com/vpr/?body=http://ww...eKey/31012006uk

This contract, worth about 13 million Euros, calls for one year mission design work up to the preliminary design review including the definition of the main system elements of the mission.
*
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Feb 13 2006, 11:39 PM
Post #22





Guests






Excerpt from the February 13, 2006, issue of Aviation Week & Space Technology:

World News & Analysis
U.S. Moon Focus Provides Opportunities for Europe on Mars, Science
Aviation Week & Space Technology
02/13/2006, page 44

Michael A. Taverna
Paris and Toulouse

[...]

"The main objective of the European Space Agency's Aurora exploration program, launched in December, is Mars. ExoMars--a 2011 lander/rover mission intended as a precursor for a Mars Sample Return (MSR) flight--will lead off.

"Funding for ExoMars is already well beyond the requested 593-million-euro budget envelope. ESA has 651 million euros in commitments to date, and is likely to exceed 700 million euros with the likely participation of Canada.

"Although the extra money could be used to add an orbiter to ExoMars, ESA is leaning toward earmarking the funds for MSR, which is already expected to get the lion's share of 73 million euros in Aurora technology funding (AW&ST Jan. 23, p. 15). 'Interest in MSR has definitely gone up a notch,' said Alain Pradier, who heads Aurora's technology office. Noting that NASA recently pushed back its date for MSR to the end of the next decade, while ESA continues to target a first mission in 2016-18, Pradier said ESA might even be willing to take a lead role in MSR--or at least act as the focal point for international collaboration.

"European officials acknowledged ESA is not yet in a position to do this. For one thing, said Richard Bonneville, who heads solar system exploration at French space agency CNES, Italy--the only European space power with an expanding budget--is showing a strong interest in the Moon. But he noted that the European science community has consistently backed the Martian preference. The final road map for ESA's Cosmic Vision science program for 2015-25, issued in October, lists planetary exploration as one of four themes to be pursued, and Mars figures prominently on the roster of exploration goals."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Rakhir
post Mar 16 2006, 01:07 PM
Post #23


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 370
Joined: 12-September 05
From: France
Member No.: 495



Europe Mars shot looks to upgrade
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4812556.stm

The consequences of the US science budget cuttings on Exomars mission.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_AlexBlackwell_*
post Mar 16 2006, 06:00 PM
Post #24





Guests






QUOTE (Rakhir @ Mar 16 2006, 01:07 PM) *
Europe Mars shot looks to upgrade
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4812556.stm

The consequences of the US science budget cuttings on Exomars mission.

Don't underestimate the "nationalistic" angle, Rakhir.

"[Converting the ExoMars carrier spacecraft into an orbiter, Vago] said, would allow the European mission 'to gain some independence from MRO' and also pave the way for 'a follow-up to the excellent science Mars Express is conducting today.'

"Going down the route of using MRO as a relay means ExoMars would have to compete for time on the orbiter with Nasa's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, due to launch in 2009."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ljk4-1
post Apr 25 2006, 02:51 PM
Post #25


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 2454
Joined: 8-July 05
From: NGC 5907
Member No.: 430



The technology for this "lab on a chip" sounds amazing, but since it seems
pretty clear that any existing life on Mars is probably deep underground,
what can they hope to find with it just from analysing the surface? Waste
products from the creatures that drift upwards? Dead bodies? No, I am
not being facetious.


Life-Marker Chip Planned For ESA Mars Lander

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Life_Mar...ars_Lander.html


--------------------
"After having some business dealings with men, I am occasionally chagrined,
and feel as if I had done some wrong, and it is hard to forget the ugly circumstance.
I see that such intercourse long continued would make one thoroughly prosaic, hard,
and coarse. But the longest intercourse with Nature, though in her rudest moods, does
not thus harden and make coarse. A hard, sensible man whom we liken to a rock is
indeed much harder than a rock. From hard, coarse, insensible men with whom I have
no sympathy, I go to commune with the rocks, whose hearts are comparatively soft."

- Henry David Thoreau, November 15, 1853

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
tty
post Apr 25 2006, 08:43 PM
Post #26


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 685
Joined: 20-April 05
From: Sweden
Member No.: 273



QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Apr 25 2006, 04:51 PM) *
The technology for this "lab on a chip" sounds amazing, but since it seems
pretty clear that any existing life on Mars is probably deep underground,
what can they hope to find with it just from analysing the surface? Waste
products from the creatures that drift upwards? Dead bodies? No, I am
not being facetious.



A great deal. There has been a lot of progress in recent years in identifying bio-marker molecules that indicate the one-time existance of a variety of life forms (cyanobacteria, methanogens, eucaryotes etc) and which are stable enough to last billions of years here on Earth. The main problem is the possibly strongly oxidizing chemistry of Martian topsoil, so it would probably be advisable to crush rocks and analyze the interior.

tty
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
PhilHorzempa
post May 26 2006, 03:03 AM
Post #27


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 167
Joined: 17-March 06
Member No.: 709





Even though the American Mars program has been cut back, it's nice
to know that there will still be one more "M.E.R." going to Mars.
Here is a recent look at the 2011 ExoMars Rover as it drives off of its
airbag-assisted lander.


http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/aurora...rslander_HI.jpg


This image is from ESA.


Another Phil
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
lyford
post May 26 2006, 04:00 AM
Post #28


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1272
Joined: 18-December 04
From: San Diego, CA
Member No.: 124



That's a really nice pic - looks like the drill is included? Like the "chrome" finish tongue.gif

I really like the mission overlap as well - MSL should still be kicking by then... Heck, MERs may even last until Phoenix lands!

More here...


--------------------
Lyford Rome
"Zis is not nuts, zis is super-nuts!" Mathematician Richard Courant on viewing an Orion test
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
jamescanvin
post May 26 2006, 04:14 AM
Post #29


Senior Member
****

Group: Moderator
Posts: 2250
Joined: 9-February 04
From: UK
Member No.: 16



QUOTE (PhilHorzempa @ May 26 2006, 01:03 PM) *


That's a neat trick getting it to roll to a stop at the top of a nice hill!

Nice looking rover smile.gif


EDIT:
Husband Hill summit in the background of this one if I'm not mistaken.

http://www.esa.int/esa-mmg/mmg.pl?b=b&keyw...&start=6&size=b

James


--------------------
My MER & MSL Imagery site - Martian Vistas ---- Twitter Feed (including sol by sol updates on Opportunity's activity)
Please support unmannedspaceflight.com by donating here
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Guest_BruceMoomaw_*
post May 26 2006, 04:39 AM
Post #30





Guests






I suspect ESA is not going to be able to come anywhere close to cramming all of their currently planned instrument payload onto that little rover. In particular, I suspect the drill may have to get the boot. By the way, I have found the text description of that drill, assuming that it is indeed the same one that Italy was originally supposed to provide for Dan Goldin's hallucinatory 2003 Mars Sample Return mission. (The previously included drawings, unfortunately, have been removed from the website.)

http://ars.asi.it/bandi/marte2003/drill-ao-pip.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

35 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 20th September 2017 - 05:50 AM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.