IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

16 Pages V  « < 14 15 16  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Lunar Spacecraft Images, A place for moon panoramas, mosaics etc.
Steve G
post May 6 2019, 01:21 AM
Post #226


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 207
Joined: 29-December 05
From: Ottawa, ON
Member No.: 624



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ May 4 2019, 07:12 AM) *
This is the current version of the lunar sites map. The empty space is for future events. I am not copyrighting this. Do what you want with it.

Phil

[attachment=44639:moon_sit...ap_post2.jpg]


For the unknown location of the Apollo 16 LM Ascent stage, is there not seismic data of the impact that can give its location? There were four active seismometers back then, was there not?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monitorlizard
post May 6 2019, 05:27 AM
Post #227


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 234
Joined: 8-May 05
Member No.: 381



for Phil (or anyone else interested)

Apollo 15 (and possibly Apollo 16) used their 16mm Mauer movie camera mounted on the lunar rover to film part of their surroundings while traveling between stations. Since the camera was in a fixed position, wouldn't it be possible to stitch frames together to show super-long linear photographic strips of terrain? It's just an odd thought I had.


I hope this doesn't violate rules. I'm only discussing photography, nothing else.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 6 2019, 11:43 AM
Post #228


Solar System Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 8044
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Steve - we don't know when the impact happened either, so it is not easy to separate out that impact from any other natural event. If it occurred on the opposite side of the Moon it would be a weak signal as well, maybe too weak. As far as I know, nobody has claimed to have seen that specific signal.

Monitor, it's not a bad thought. Apollo 15's 16 mm camera only worked very briefly. I did actually use its images to locate tracks on the west rim of Dune crater, the only place where it is useful. This is a link to my LPSC poster on the topic:

https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2018/eposter/1007.pdf

Because the Apollo 15 16mm camera didn't work well it was supplemented on Apollo 16 by images taken by Charlie Duke at frequent intervals. But then the 16mm camera worked well for them. I found the astronaut photos more useful than the 16mm images. Now I'm using the pictures taken by Jack Schmitt on Apollo 17 to map those traverses. More about that soon.

Phil



--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Steve G
post May 6 2019, 09:09 PM
Post #229


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 207
Joined: 29-December 05
From: Ottawa, ON
Member No.: 624



QUOTE (monitorlizard @ May 5 2019, 10:27 PM) *
for Phil (or anyone else interested)

Apollo 15 (and possibly Apollo 16) used their 16mm Mauer movie camera mounted on the lunar rover to film part of their surroundings while traveling between stations. Since the camera was in a fixed position, wouldn't it be possible to stitch frames together to show super-long linear photographic strips of terrain? It's just an odd thought I had.


I hope this doesn't violate rules. I'm only discussing photography, nothing else.


The DAC 16mm cameras were mostly facing forward during the drives. I think there's potential on EVA 3 near North Ray. There's more potential for orbital shots that can be stitched, even editing out the window frame in some shots. I can't find any good HD quality downloads anywhere. The available locations have blurred (out of focus) edges which means they were transferred poorly via telecine style and not scanned using modern transfer equipment. Spacecraft Films is offering all the onboards for $450 USD but that's a big gamble and they're not very active anymore.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
4throck
post May 6 2019, 09:48 PM
Post #230


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 64
Joined: 17-December 12
From: Portugal
Member No.: 6792



NASA has good quality HD scans available on Archive.org.Here's some from Apollo 15: https://archive.org/details/Apollo-15_Onboa...ilm-Mags_EE.mxf
There are some frame-rate conversion and black clipping issues on some videos, but it's a great source.Incredible potential for image processing here.


--------------------
www.astrosurf.com/nunes
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
monitorlizard
post May 7 2019, 08:03 AM
Post #231


Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 234
Joined: 8-May 05
Member No.: 381



Thanks for that link, 4throck, I really enjoyed watching that footage, though I see it's not really useful for stitching. I suppose a really determined image processor could do a geometric transformation of each frame but it wouldn't be worth the headache. SteveG, I agree about the orbital 16mm movie footage being more promising. I've seen Apollo orbital footprint maps that show long contiguous sequences of 16mm filming, apparently at nadir, that could be stitched into long, thin mosaics. I'm not an image processor, but I'd certainly be interested in seeing what would result if somebody did this. The only thing is, viewing it on a computer screen would look the same as watching the footage!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paolo
post May 12 2019, 09:08 AM
Post #232


Senior Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 1686
Joined: 3-August 06
From: 43 35' 53" N 1 26' 35" E
Member No.: 1004



QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ May 4 2019, 05:12 PM) *
This is the current version of the lunar sites map.


It looks like you will have to update the map very soon: DSLWP-B to crash on or around next July 31
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post May 12 2019, 05:34 PM
Post #233


Solar System Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 8044
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Yes, and Chandrayaan 2 in about September, and Chang'e 5 in December.

Phil


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
4throck
post May 13 2019, 08:28 AM
Post #234


Junior Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 64
Joined: 17-December 12
From: Portugal
Member No.: 6792



QUOTE (monitorlizard @ May 7 2019, 09:03 AM) *
<br />Thanks for that link, 4throck, I really enjoyed watching that footage...


There are some interesting things on NASA's resource reels, and also on some vintage documentaries.

Looking elsewhere, and to stay on topic, searching Youtube for "Surveyor 3" gets you:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6yQfbFMBcY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WFT5_jLLjU

Both are very interesting smile.gif

There's much more about other missions if you know where to look, including some Pioneer video images, but that's better discussed on a specific topic about image sources I think.


--------------------
www.astrosurf.com/nunes
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil Stooke
post Oct 30 2019, 09:38 PM
Post #235


Solar System Cartographer
****

Group: Members
Posts: 8044
Joined: 5-April 05
From: Canada
Member No.: 227



Here is the latest version of the Lunar Sites map. I have added Chandrayaan 2 (Vikram) and Longjiang 2 impacts, and moved Chandrayaan 1's MIP impact to the far side as I now believe it should be. Next year will see the Chang'e 5 sample return, I hope, and several events can be expected in 2021 - CLPS landings or attempts by Astrobotic and Intuitive Machines, OMOTENASHI (micro-lander from Japan launched with Artemis 1) and perhaps others including mission-ending impacts for Lunar Flashlight and LunarH-Map (also with Artemis 1).

Phil

Attached Image


--------------------
... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

16 Pages V  « < 14 15 16
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 12th December 2019 - 11:04 PM
RULES AND GUIDELINES
Please read the Forum Rules and Guidelines before posting.

IMAGE COPYRIGHT
Images posted on UnmannedSpaceflight.com may be copyrighted. Do not reproduce without permission. Read here for further information on space images and copyright.

OPINIONS AND MODERATION
Opinions expressed on UnmannedSpaceflight.com are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UnmannedSpaceflight.com or The Planetary Society. The all-volunteer UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderation team is wholly independent of The Planetary Society. The Planetary Society has no influence over decisions made by the UnmannedSpaceflight.com moderators.
SUPPORT THE FORUM
Unmannedspaceflight.com is a project of the Planetary Society and is funded by donations from visitors and members. Help keep this forum up and running by contributing here.