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James Webb Space Telescope, information, updates and discussion
JRehling
post Jun 4 2021, 05:49 PM
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That is a perfect display of the data and observation about it!

On the bright side, the longer that it takes to get JWST into space, the longer in the future before its operation ceases. One of its main purposes will be to observe exoplanets and more of them are being discovered through other means before JWST launches. It's entirely possible – even probable? – that the delays will end up providing some important opportunities for exoplanet science that would have been missed with earlier launch dates.
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Explorer1
post Jun 5 2021, 01:00 AM
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True, but many ephemeral objects (and events) have come and gone in the past few years. I wonder what it would have made of ‘Oumuamua?
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JRehling
post Jun 5 2021, 04:06 PM
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JWST will have about the same resolution as HST, so it wouldn't have given us anything but a dot, but the IR spectral coverage may have turned something up. I don't think that 'Oumuamua plays to any of JWST's strengths, but a Rumsfeldian maxim applies: You don't know what you don't know.

Presumably, there will be as many interesting rare events in any decade as in any other decade, and I would imagine that the steady increase in sky surveys that can find those means, again, that JWST will have a better chance of seeing more in the future than in the past. The survey system that discovered 'Oumuamua, for example, had its two telescopes go online in 2008 and 2014. If JWST had been up in the sky in 2013 and a similar event had happened then, it would have been more likely that we simply would have missed it. It's not a pure coincidence that we've discovered two interstellar interlopers in the past four years and zero in the previous four hundred years.
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Holder of the Tw...
post Aug 27 2021, 03:30 PM
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The JWST has completed all testing and is being buttoned up for transport to Kourou, French Guiana.

Launch is planned for this November.

ESA Report Link

NASA Goddard Report Link

Launch of the James Webb Telescope is finally becoming a thing.
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JRehling
post Sep 8 2021, 07:11 PM
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JWST now has an announced launch date of December 18, 2021. Our long patient wait is nearing an end!
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jasedm
post Sep 8 2021, 09:58 PM
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QUOTE (djellison @ Aug 23 2005, 03:10 PM) *
Just how does it end up costing $4.5B ( which will become $5B I'm sure)


...aaaaand nearly double that...

This has to be one of the longest-running continuous threads on the internet. Commenter's consternation over a delay until 2007...No implied criticism of any of the agencies involved, but wow, just wow!

Really looking forward to launch in December - I'm sure the instrument will reveal some amazing stuff.
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